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Patricia Brady

sculptor and proprietor of a large marble yard and monument business, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the eldest son and third child of [René] Prosper Foy (b. 1787–d. 1854), a Napoleonic veteran, marble cutter, businessman, and writer, who had immigrated to the city from France in 1807, and Azelie Aubry (b. c. 1795–d. 1870), a free woman of color, native to New Orleans. Because interracial marriage was illegal, Foy's parents never married, but their sometimes stormy union lasted from 1810 until Prosper Foy's death; Aubry subsequently referred to herself in all public documents as his widow. The elder Prosper Foy prospered in business and fought with distinction at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. Of Foy and Aubry's children, four daughters and Florville lived to adulthood.

Florville studied with a private tutor, and all the children were well educated, judging by their copybooks and letters. In 1836 ...

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Patricia Brady

sculptor, was born a slave in New Orleans, Louisiana, the eldest son of Daniel Warburg, a wealthy German Jewish immigrant and Warburg's mixed-race slave, Marie Rose Blondeau, born in Cuba, the child of refugees from Saint-Domingue. After the boy's birth, Warburg emancipated Blondeau and settled property in her name. The couple continued to live together until her death on 1 November 1837; their four younger children were born free.

Early in 1830Daniel Warburg gained permission from local authorities to free Eugène In a notarial document he and a coguarantor posted a $500 bond a considerable sum and pledged to support the boy until he came of age to teach him to read and write and to educate him in a trade Warburg s friend business associate and attorney who became in effect the boy s godfather was Pierre Soulé a French immigrant lawyer and ...