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Erica Campbell

was born the son of Mildred Abdulah (née Hughes), a housewife, and Walter Abdulah, a civil servant, in Woodbrook, Trinidad. He attended Queen’s Royal College, a secondary school in Trinidad and Tobago’s capital, Port of Spain, from 1937 to 1944. From there, he moved on to earn a bachelor of arts degree, with a major in zoology, at the University of Pennsylvania (1946–1950); a bachelor’s in theology at Trinity College in Canada (1951–1954); a master’s of theology at Union Theological Seminary (1962–1965); and a doctor of ministry degree at Seabury-Western Theological Seminary (completed in 1993).

It is clear that education played an important role in Abdulah s life as revealed not only by what he achieved academically but also by what he did when he attained those academic credentials His has been a lifelong journey of learning which has been the foundation ...

Article

David Killingray

Pan‐AfricanMarxist and scholar. Blackman was born in Barbados and won a scholarship to the University of Durham, where he studied theology. He was ordained in the Anglican Church and went to the Gambia as a missionary priest, where he clashed with his bishop over differences of pay for white and black clergy. Having resigned from the Church, Blackman returned to Barbados, but then, in 1938, he settled in London. He joined the leftist Negro Welfare Association, of which he became chairman, and also the League Against Imperialism, being a major speaker on both their platforms. He also became a member of the Executive Committee of the more liberally inclined League of Coloured Peoples, and in 1938–9 editor of its then occasional journal The Keys, writing critically on colonial policy; he also gave evidence to the Royal Commission on the West Indies. In November 1938 ...

Article

Amar Wahab

Pastor, community activist, and Black leader in Liverpool. Born George Daniel, Daniels Ekarte worked as an errand boy with the Free Church of Scotland in Calabar, Nigeria. Inspired to become a missionary in England, he left as a galley‐hand on board a ship bound for Liverpool in 1915. There, instead of encountering a charitable Christian people, Ekarte met with strong racist attitudes and felt deceived by the missionaries in Nigeria. After a period of disenchantment, he began worshipping with Africans, holding prayer services both in private spaces and in the street. With sponsorship from the Church of Scotland, Pastor Ekarte opened the African Churches Mission in Liverpool in 1931. The Mission was primarily aimed at providing a space of worship and socializing for blacks in Liverpool.

As a community activist and leader, Pastor Ekarte also had a keen interest in the education and welfare ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

was born 26 January 1912 in Shanghai, China, the son of Leo ffrench-Beytagh, an Irish manager of a British cotton company located in that city, and Edith “Pegs” McIlraith. Both of ffrench-Beytagh’s parents suffered from alcoholism, and they introduced their son to gin at the tender age of five. Though his father was a former seminarian who had turned against Christianity and his mother professed no religion at all, ffrench-Beytagh was baptized at the Anglican cathedral of Shanghai.

When his mother left her husband early in Gonville’s childhood, his father sent him off to England to be raised by Esylt Newbery, a pious Anglican woman. He attended boarding schools at Monkton Combe near Bath and Bristol Grammar School and later recalled in his rollicking autobiography Encountering Darkness how Anglican instruction and the rules of boarding school life made him feel trapped and angry Though his teachers wanted him to ...

Article

Peter Limb

Trevor Huddleston, an anti-apartheid human rights activist and Anglican bishop, only lived in South Africa from 1943 to 1956, but his name became synonymous with the struggle against apartheid. In a career of political activism spanning fifty years, he combined devout Christianity with commitment to social justice in general and African liberation from colonialism and apartheid in particular.

Huddleston was born in Bedford, England, in 1913, to a father who was often absent from the family, serving as commander of the Royal Indian Navy. Huddleston’s deep attachment to Christianity originated with his mother. After studying at Oxford University and Wells Theological College, in 1937 he was ordained a priest and two years later joined the Anglican monastic order of the Community of the Resurrection which was involved in considerable missionary educational work in Southern Africa Raised in a comfortable lifestyle in Hampstead his initial pastoral work ...

Article

Trevor Huddleston was ordained a priest in 1937 and entered the Community of the Resurrection Anglican order before being sent to South Africa in 1943. As deacon of the Anglican Missions of Sophiatown and then Orlando (outside of Johannesburg), Huddleston witnessed and protested against the injustices of apartheid. When the Native Resettlement Act of 1954 called for the destruction of Sophiatown to make way for a white suburb, he became chairperson of the Western Areas Protest Committee to support the blacks in defense of their homes. Despite his actions, Sophiatown was bulldozed in 1955 and the black residents were relocated to the black township of Soweto. Huddleston recorded the plight of Sophiatown in his 1956 book Naught for Your Comfort a condemnation of South Africa s policy of persecution He also worked with the African National Congress ANC to help bring about the Freedom Charter the ANC s ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

His mother and father taught him to see helping other people as a way of acting out their Christian faith. Lapsley became committed to becoming an Anglican priest by his adolescent years, and chose not to wait until after university to pursue his religious vocation. He entered Saint Michael’s House, a seminary run by the Society of the Sacred Mission (SSM), an Anglo-Catholic religious order located outside of Adelaide, Australia. Lapsley was ordained as a deacon in 1971, and initially requested to work in Japan. Instead he moved to South Africa to serve as a priest, for reasons that never became entirely clear to him. On 29 July 1973 Lapsley was ordained as an Anglican priest By this point key liberal Anglican opponents of the apartheid system of white supremacy such as Michael Reeves and Trevor Huddleston had been forced out of South Africa Lapsley was immediately confronted ...

Article

Nazneen Ahmed

First black West Indian ordained into the Church of England. Educated at Queen's College school in Demerara, British Guiana (now Guyana), Mackenzie travelled to England in 1852 to attend St Augustine s Missionary College Canterbury where he gained the Hebrew Prize He was recommended for the priesthood by the ...

Article

John Gilmore

Clergyman of the Church of England who led what he later considered to be a reprobate youth and worked in the slave trade. It was while on a slaving voyage (1748–9) that he experienced a religious conversion. Nevertheless, he continued to work in the slave trade, and made three more voyages before retiring from the sea in 1754. He became widely known as an evangelical Christian, and was eventually ordained as a clergyman of the Church of England in 1764, serving first in the parish of Olney in Buckinghamshire, and later, from 1780 until his death, at St Mary Woolnoth in London.

At Olney, Newton became a close friend of the poet William Cowper, and together they wrote the collection known as the Olney Hymns. Newton's own contributions include the words to some of the best known hymns in the English language ...

Article

John Gilmore

Clergyman of the Church of England and campaigner against the slave trade. Peckard was educated at the University of Oxford and held various positions in the Church before becoming Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge, in 1781. He retained this office until his death, and was also Dean of Peterborough from 1792.

In 1785, as Vice‐Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, Peckard set the subject for a university Latin essay competition: Anne liceat invitos in servitutem dare? [‘Is it lawful to make men slaves against their will?’] The prize was won by Thomas Clarkson, who entered the competition in search of academic honours but discovered his life's work in the process.

Peckard was himself an eloquent critic of the slave trade. In a 1788 sermon before the University of Cambridge he stated that there was no validity in any of the arguments usually brought forward ...

Article

Edward Andrews

Anglican missionary and educator stationed at Cape Coast (in present-day Ghana) during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, is also referred to as Kweku or Quarco. He was the first African minister ordained in the Church of England. Born into a Fetu family in 1741, Quaque lived near Cape Coast Castle, at the very heart of British slave trade operations in West Africa. His letters to other missionaries throughout the Atlantic world, as well as his numerous reports about missionary activity around the Cape Coast, detail his extraordinary efforts to convert and educate Africans, as well as the many challenges he faced as a black preacher operating at the center of the transatlantic slave trade.

In some ways Quaque s missionary history began in New Jersey Thomas Thompson an Anglican missionary who abandoned his unsuccessful mission in New Jersey in order to try to attempt to spread the ...

Article

John Gilmore

Also known as Kweku (1741–1816), the first African clergyman of the Church of England. Quaque was a Fante, born at Cape Coast in what is now Ghana. He was the only survivor of three Fante boys sent to England in 1754 by a missionary of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG) in order that they might be educated. Baptized as Philip in 1759, he was ordained in 1765, the first African to become a priest of the Church of England.

He returned to Cape Coast in 1766, and spent most of the rest of his life there, combining the position of chaplain at Cape Coast Castle, a trading fort maintained by the African Company (successor to the Royal African Company who paid him a salary for his work in this capacity with that of a missionary employed by the SPG Many ...

Article

John Gilmore

Clergyman of the Church of England and critic of Caribbean slavery born in Scotland. Originally trained as a surgeon, he spent six years in the Royal Navy in that capacity. On one occasion during this period he visited a slave ship where there was an epidemic on board in order to provide treatment to the victims. Ramsay eventually decided to leave the Navy because of an accident that had left him lame. In 1762 he was ordained by the Bishop of London, and returned to the Caribbean island of St Kitts (St Christopher), which he had previously visited while in the Navy. He spent most of the next nineteen years in St Kitts, as rector of two parishes there, and married the daughter of a local planter.

Ramsay s attempts to preach Christianity to the slaves and his involvement in local political issues made him unpopular with his white parishioners ...