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Erica Campbell

was born the son of Mildred Abdulah (née Hughes), a housewife, and Walter Abdulah, a civil servant, in Woodbrook, Trinidad. He attended Queen’s Royal College, a secondary school in Trinidad and Tobago’s capital, Port of Spain, from 1937 to 1944. From there, he moved on to earn a bachelor of arts degree, with a major in zoology, at the University of Pennsylvania (1946–1950); a bachelor’s in theology at Trinity College in Canada (1951–1954); a master’s of theology at Union Theological Seminary (1962–1965); and a doctor of ministry degree at Seabury-Western Theological Seminary (completed in 1993).

It is clear that education played an important role in Abdulah s life as revealed not only by what he achieved academically but also by what he did when he attained those academic credentials His has been a lifelong journey of learning which has been the foundation ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

Anglicanarchbishop, was born on 27 January 1944 in Maga Adeniregun a village near the Nigerian city of Abeokuta Akinola s father Ttitus Oke Akinola a poor farmer and hunter died when the boy was just four years old Janet Amoke Oyedele his mother lost two children in infancy before Akinola s birth Akinola s maternal uncle Soge agreed to help raise the child as his mother s trading could not support the entire family Soge began Akinola s training as a carpenter although he did attend primary school at the same time Around the age of fourteen Akinola then joined the business of his paternal uncle Gabriel Faneye Oyedele since he no longer could afford the cost of attending school This relationship ultimately did not work out Frustrated Akinola went back to carpentry and moved to the Nigerian capital Lagos He has claimed that he barely survived ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

was born in Leicester, United Kingdom on 12 December 1884. His mother was Katherine Clayton (née Hare) and his father was Lewis Clayton, the Anglican bishop of Leicester and later Peterborough. Clayton had three siblings: Lewis, Harold, and Katherine. After attending several primary schools, Clayton won a scholarship to the highly prestigious Rugby secondary school in 1897. He attended Cambridge University and graduated in 1908. A year later, he was ordained an Anglican priest. Clayton had developed a very High Church Anglo-Catholic perspective during his time in university that never wavered for the rest of his life. From that year until 1934 Clayton worked as a priest in several different positions in England including several stints as a chaplain with British troops in Palestine during World War I and as vicar of the parish of Chesterfield He was elected to the position of bishop of Johannesburg ...

Article

Michael R. Mahoney

first Anglican bishop of Natal, theologian, and political activist, was born in Saint Austell, Cornwall, on 24 January 1814, the eldest of four children of a mineral agent to the Duchy of Cornwall. He began attending Saint John’s College, Cambridge University, in 1832, and in 1836 he graduated as a second wrangler in the mathematical tripos and a second Smith’s prizeman. A year later he was elected a fellow at Saint John’s. In 1839 he took up holy orders in the Church of England but worked as a mathematics tutor at Harrow, where he gained some notoriety as an author of mathematics texts. During this period Colenso also became increasingly active in the Church of England and in 1846 became rector of Forncett Saint Mary Church in Norfolk County. That same year he married Sarah Frances Bunyon, with whom he had five children.

In 1853 at the ...

Article

Cajetan Nnaocha

educator, linguist, and first African Anglican bishop in Nigeria, was born in about 1809 at Oshogun, Yorubaland, in today’s Iseyin Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria.

Crowther was captured in 1821 at the age of thirteen and sold into slavery when Oshogun was raided by Fulani and Oyo Muslims. Crowther, along with other enslaved persons, was marched away to Iseyin, where he was exchanged for English wine and tobacco and handed over to Portuguese merchants engaged in the transatlantic slave trade and put on board the Experanza Feliz, bound for the New World. Fortunately, the ship was intercepted and boarded by British naval patrol ship, the Myrmidon and everyone onboard was rescued The Portuguese ship was then taken by its British captors to Sierra Leone and Crowther and the other slaves were released by them and put ashore When they arrived in Freetown rather than being treated ...

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Cajetan Nnaocha

The name “Samuel Ajayi Crowther” has become popularly associated with a slave turned bishop, an event that reshaped his life and all his works. Crowther’s fascinating and spectacular rise from a slave boy to a bishop impresses us most. There is a marked difference as well as some basic correlation between the two aspects of his background as a slave and as a religious leader. For Crowther, being a captured slave was an inglorious beginning; but as a bishop, he was elevated to a position that transformed Christianity across West Africa.

Crowther was born in Oshogun, Yorubaland, in today’s Iseyin local government area of Oyo State, Nigeria, in 1806. He was captured into slavery at the age of thirteen in 1821 together with his mother and sister when Oshogun was raided apparently by a combined team of Fulani and Oyo Muslims Crowther his mother and his sister had ...

Article

David Killingray

The first African bishop of the Church of England in West Africa. An Egba, he was born in Yorubuland and enslaved as a teenager, but rescued by a British ship and landed at the British settlement of Freetown. He was the first liberated African to be formally educated at the Church Missionary Society (CMS) grammar school, Freetown. Crowther became a Christian and was baptized in 1825, taking the name of an English clergyman. From 1825 to 1827 he was in London studying at the Islington parish school.

On his return to West Africa, Crowther trained at the Fourah Bay Institute, Freetown, and became a schoolteacher. His linguistic abilities and reputation for a devout life led the CMS to suggest he join the British Niger expedition in 1841 as an interpreter The expedition failed to achieve its purpose of planting an agricultural settlement of liberated slaves promoting trade and ...

Article

Robert Fay

Samuel Ajayi Crowther was born into a Yoruba family in western Nigeria. Until his mid-teens, he was raised in traditional Yoruba society. In 1821, however, slave traders raided his home village, kidnapped Crowther, his mother, and sisters, and separated them from each other. Traders then sold Crowther to Portuguese slavers, who in 1822 loaded him onto a slave ship bound for Brazil. Luckily, a British antislavery warship intercepted his captors; they rescued Crowther and took him to Freetown, Sierra Leone. In Sierra Leone, the Christian Missionary Society (CMS) took Crowther in, and he began attending mission schools. Gifted linguistically, within six months of his arrival Crowther could read and write English. He went by his birth name of Ajayi until 1825 when he was baptized an Anglican and took the name Samuel Crowther after a CMS missionary of the same name An impressive student Crowther traveled ...

Article

Stacey Graham

bishop of Carthage, is the most important bishop of the North African Church before Augustine (d. 429/430) and one of the fathers of the early Latin Church. He wrote several treatises and letters to his congregation, especially while in exile during the Decian persecutions of 250–251. Reinstated at Carthage during a period of peace, he was arrested when persecutions resumed during the reign of Valerian and executed in 258. His martyrdom, his writings, and his stature as bishop in the third-century church ensured his later canonization. Cyprian is well known for his organization of the Christian community at Carthage and his position on the question of rebaptism that achieved a middle ground between Novatianists who opposed reintegration of lapsed priests and Catholics who more readily forgave those who forswore their religion in the face of persecution.

Cyprian came from a wealthy and privileged background in Carthage and received a good ...

Article

Carmen De Michele

Christian theologian and bishop, who initiated a doctrinal dispute with the patriarch of Constantinople, Nestorius, about the two natures of Jesus Christ, was born in Alexandria in the year 375. He spent several years of his life in a monastery in the Nitrian Mountains until he succeeded his uncle Theophilus as bishop of Alexandria in 412. He confronted the church of the Novatianists, a sect that opposed the power of the church and granted protection and absolution to those believers who returned to idolatry because of persecution. He closed their churches and took over their church treasuries. Cyril further challenged the authority of the civil government by expelling the Jews from the city of Alexandria in the year 415, triggering violent riots.

Cyril was also indirectly involved in the murder of one of the most prominent female pagan philosophers and scientists of antiquity Hypatia A highly respected and influential citizen ...

Article

Kevin Ward

Ugandan evangelist and Anglican bishop of Kigezi diocese in the Church of Uganda, was born in Mpororo, which had recently been incorporated into the British Protectorate of Uganda. Mpororo, like many inter-lacustrine states, consisted of an agriculturalist majority (Bairu) and a high-status cattle-keeping minority (Bahima). Kivengere belonged to the Bahima group. He was the grandson of King Makobore, who had first signed a treaty with the British in 1912. In 1930 Kivengere was baptized into the Anglican Church of Uganda, the quasi- established church set up by the Church Missionary Society (CMS). Kivengere attended CMS schools at Kinyasano and Kabale in the Kigezi district of southwest Uganda.

In the 1930s a revival movement known as Balokole Saved People was making a strong impact in this part of Uganda having spread from the CMS mission station of Gahini in Belgian Ruanda Kivengere at first resisted the new movement like many ...

Article

Kevin Ward

Anglican archbishop of Uganda, was born in Mucwini, near Kitum, in northern Uganda. He was from the Acholi people, a Lwo-speaking group related to the Dinka of Sudan and the Luo of Kenya. His parents were among the first Christians in the Kitgum district, so Luwum had a Christian upbringing and the chance to attend the major Anglican school in northern Uganda, Gulu High School. He went on to train as a primary school teacher.

In 1948 he came in contact with the East African Revival movement, the Balokole He was converted to a living faith saved in revival language and became a member of the fellowship The revival had been brought to northern Uganda by a Muganda medical doctor Eliya Lubulwa His most prominent Acholi convert was Yusto Otunnu who in turn profoundly influenced the young Luwum Yusto Otunnu remained an important and controversial figure in the revival ...

Article

John Gilmore

Clergyman of the Church of England and campaigner against the slave trade. Porteus was an acquaintance of James Ramsay, whom he encouraged to publish his influential Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves in the British Sugar Colonies (1784).

As Bishop of Chester (1776–87), Porteus preached a sermon in 1783 before the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in which he urged them to take steps to ensure the Christianization of the slaves the Society owned on its plantations in Barbados, a plea that fell on deaf ears. As Bishop of London from 1787 until his death Porteus took an active interest in the Anglican Church in the British West Indian colonies at that date considered part of his diocese but difficulties of communication and the fact that the Bishop possessed little in the way of legal powers over his ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

the son of Richard Reeves, a pharmacist, and Clarissa Reeves (née Lydamore) on 6 December 1899. When Reeves’ father died in 1905 his mother was forced to support Ambrose and his brother and sister by teaching music lessons. Clarissa Reeves and her children moved to Great Yarmouth, where they shared a house with her mother and four female schoolteachers. Reeves attended an Anglican school in Great Yarmouth, and won a scholarship to the town’s grammar school in 1912. There he hoped to eventually become a pharmacist like his late father. He served in the British army from 1917 to 1918 during World War I, but his poor eyesight made him unfit for combat. During his military days Reeves felt a calling to the Anglican priesthood, and entered Cambridge University in 1921, graduating in 1924 For the next two years Reeves continued his theological training at the ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

Anglican bishop, was born on 7 April 1958 in Kwekwe, Zimbabwe. Little is known about his family and early life, other than that he completed his primary and secondary education in Kwekwe. Tengatenga became convinced he had a religious vocation as an Anglican priest, and entered Zomba Theological College in 1979, located in Zomba, Malawi. After three years of training there, he continued his education in the United States, from 1982 to 1985, when he studied at the Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. Before being ordained as a priest in 1985, this period also marked the beginning of Tengatenga's family life. He married his wife Jocelyn in Austin. They had three children together: Susan (b. 1988), Cecil (b. 1990), and Alinafe (b. 1995 Over the course of his adult life the Tengatenga family also raised six ...