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Luckett V. Davis

boxer, was born Henry Jackson Jr. near Columbus, Mississippi, the son of Henry Jackson. His mother, whose name is unknown, was a full‐blooded Iroquois, and his father was of mixed Indian, Irish, and black ancestry. He was the eleventh child in a family of sharecroppers. When he was four years old his family moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where his father and older brothers worked in the food‐processing industry. His mother died a few years later, after which he was reared by his paternal grandmother. Jackson graduated from Toussaint L'Ouverture Grammar School and Vashon High School, working during his school years as a pin boy at a bowling alley and becoming the inter‐alley bowling champion in midtown St. Louis. He gained his first boxing experience by winning a competition among the pin boys.

Lacking funds to attend college, Jackson worked at a series of unskilled jobs At the ...

Article

Terence M. Mashingaidze

nationalist politician, first titular president of independent Zimbabwe, statesman, peace broker, clergyman, author, soccer administrator, academic, poet, and journalist, was born on 5 March 1936 at Esiphezini, in Essexvale (now Esigodini) District near Bulawayo in Southern Rhodesia. The versatile Banana’s father, Aaron, was a migrant laborer from Malawi while his mother, Jese, was a Zimbabwean Ndebele woman. Banana married Janet Mbuyazwe in 1961; the marriage produced three sons and a daughter. Banana attended Mzinyati primary school and Tegwani High School. He trained as a teacher at Tegwani Training Institute and then attended Epworth Theological Seminary, resulting in his ordination as a Methodist preacher in 1962 Subsequently he worked as a Methodist schools manager principal chairperson of the Bulawayo Council of Churches and member of the Rhodesian Christian Council and World Council of Churches In the 1970s Banana attained a BA with honors in theology through distance learning from ...

Article

Robert Repino

football player, was born to Mabel and Samuel Cunningham in Santa Barbara, California. Mabel worked as a nurse, and Samuel was a porter on the Southern Pacific Railroad. The Cunninghams lived in a house purchased by their oldest son, Sam Cunningham, who was a running back with the New England Patriots in the 1970s. Randall also had two other older brothers, Anthony and Bruce.

Randall Cunningham was a star quarterback at Santa Barbara High School, leading his team to a league title and to the state finals in his senior year. After graduating in 1981 Cunningham went to the University of Nevada Las Vegas where he became the starter as a sophomore From then on he set school records by throwing for over 2 500 yards in three straight seasons only John Elway and Doug Flutie had accomplished that feat at the college level by then while at ...

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Luke Nichter

Negro National League commissioner, longtime Harlem community activist, and ordained Episcopalian minister was born in Richmond, Virginia, to John Wesley and Harriet Howard Johnson.

Although Johnson was known primarily for his role as the last president of the Negro National League (NNL), he actually had little baseball acumen. In fact his sport of choice was basketball, and as a student-athlete at Columbia University in the early 1920s, he was one of the best basketball players of his day.

After graduating with a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in Anthropology from Columbia College, Johnson studied at Union Theological and General Theological seminaries in Manhattan. Then in 1923 he became an ordained minister in the Episcopal Church, beginning a career of service in Harlem that spanned seven decades. In 1928 he founded St. Martin's Parish in Harlem and by the late 1940s had overseen the congregation s ...

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Adam R. Hornbuckle

Audrey Mae Patterson was the only child of Lionel Patterson, a porter and chauffeur, and Josephine Nero Patterson, a cook.

After graduating from Danneel Elementary School, Patterson entered Gilbert Academy, a Methodist-affiliated school in New Orleans devoted to the education of African American children. Participating on the track and field team, she compiled an undefeated record in the 100-, 220-, and 440-yard dashes. In 1944Jesse Owens, who had won four gold medals at the 1936 Olympic Games, spoke to the students, encouraging them to pursue their dreams and remain optimistic about the future despite racial injustice. Patterson later said that she believed Owens spoke directly to her, motivating her to compete in the Olympics.

After graduating from Gilbert in 1945 Patterson enrolled at Wiley College in Marshall Texas An historically black college affiliated with the Methodist church and known for high academic standards Wiley had made significant ...

Article

Pellom McDaniels

professional football player and minister, was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, to unmarried parents, nineteen-year-old Thelma Dodd, and Charles White, a semiprofessional baseball player. As a child growing up within the close-knit extended family the Dodds provided, White was mostly influenced by his aunts and cousins, but especially by his maternal grandmother. Mildred Dodd was called “Mother” by all, and she was the first to introduce the young White to the Christian faith. At the age of thirteen, White declared his faith in Jesus Christ and began his quest for truth, living his life by the lessons he learned in the Bible. The future “Minister of Defense” would grow physically and mentally in his convictions and in his dedication to his new identity. In 1979 White now seventeen was ordained as a minister at St John s Baptist Church where he testified openly and unapologetically to both ...