1-6 of 6 results  for:

  • Afro-Colombian Singer x
  • Performing Arts x
Clear all

Article

María Auxiliadora González Malabet

was born on 30 August 1926 in Quibdó in the department of Chocó Colombia Nicknamed the black DaVinci and El Brujo an alias roughly translated as a man who knows a lot Mosquera was one of the most well rounded artists of Quibdó and Colombia He was the son of Solomon Córdoba Valencia and Clara Mosquera Clara was a housewife who sold fruit and fish and also performed as a street singer Alfonso s interest in music and sculpture however came from his father who was a domestic carpenter who also transported passengers across the river and entertained them by singings to them or telling them jokes Alfonso inherited not only an interest in singing and composing but also in the art form of carving wood and clay As a child he was first inspired to carve statues out of clay after he saw images of saints at the ...

Article

Edwin Corena Puentes

was born along the shore of the Raposo River in an impoverished region of the Colombian Pacific. From childhood, Baudilio listened to the marimba, an artisanal percussion instrument that has been played in the Colombian Pacific since colonial times. Cuama once said in an interview that he always tagged along with his father when he went fishing in the river. While his father immersed himself in his work, Baudilio looked after the instrument. His curiosity continued to grow, and rather than merely perfecting a few beginner melodies, he turned into a gifted performer. The life of Cuama would seem to be a perfect example of the life of so many folk musicians, who, despite their talent and passion for music, have to overcome social obstacles and cultural discrimination so that, in the end, the value of the music they create will be recognized regardless of their origins.

Cuama honed his ...

Article

Aura Posada

also known as “El Niño Piña” (The Boy Piña) and the “Hijo de San Marcos” (Son of Saint Mark), was born Juan de la Cruz Valderrama in San Marcos, Sucre, a municipality on Colombia’s Caribbean coast. He is a singer of tropical music from the north of Colombia, including the genres of porro, cumbia, vallenato, and merecumbé. His musical abilities were no doubt inherited from his African-descended family, as his father, Juan Piña Arrieta, was an orchestra director, composer, and musical arranger; and his brother, Carlos, was a clarinetist. Both were distinguished musicians at the national and international level.

The Colombian composer Carlos Martelo opened the doors to the music world for Juan Piña when he hired him as the vocalist for the band Los Hermanos Martelo, with which he played from 1969 to 1974. In 1975 Juan Piña together with his brother Carlos ...

Article

María Auxiliadora González Malabet

was born on 24 September 1927 in Noanamá, on the San Juan River, in the department of Chocó, Colombia, and died on 1 May 2008. In 1930, when Ninfa Aurora was 3 years old, her family moved to the seaport city of Buenaventura in the Valle del Cauca department. She lived in this Pacific coastal region for the next seventy-seven years of her life.

Many authors define her as self taught because when she was a child she learned to read and write using charcoal on cardboard to copy the names of shops and barns At the same time she helped her family by selling arepas a Colombian staple food in the village of Pueblo Nuevo In her academic life Ninfa Aurora studied education and culture and she later graduated with the title Teacher of Culture from the Universidad Campesina locally known as the University of Resistance in ...

Article

Gladys Zubiría Fuentes

was born in Tadó, Chocó, Colombia, around 1945. She is the founder of Fundación Raíces Negras (the Black Roots Foundation), a nonprofit organization created in response to the social problems facing the Pacific region of Colombia—fighting the loss of its Afro-American identity and preserving its values—while working toward the peaceful coexistence of all Colombian cultures.

Her passion for education and music derived from her father, Baltazar Rosero. She earned a bachelor’s degree in social and economic sciences from the University of Colombia Libre University, with a specialization in artistic education and cultural management. Afterward, she became a teacher at the Normal School, a primary school in Quibdó.

Throughout her extensive career as an educator she has primarily worked with Afro Colombian youth Promoting their Afro identity as a minority group and instilling pride in that identity as an integral part of the nation have been the central goals of ...

Article

Liliana Obregón

Totó la Momposina, as she is known, was born Sonia Bazanta in the town of Talaigua, Colombia, on the river island of Mompós, from which she took her stage name. The small towns on the Magdalena River (on Mompós and in surrounding areas, including Soplaviento, Palenque de San Basilio, Botón de Leyva, and Altos del Rosario) are heirs to a rich Afro-Indian musical tradition. Originally inhabited by indigenous peoples, during the colonial period these areas became a safe haven for fugitive slaves, who built fortified villages known as palenques.

Totó is a fourth-generation musician—her grandfather was an accordionist, her father is a traditional drummer (tambolero), and her mother was a traditional singer (cantadora). Totó’s parents and family sought to preserve secular and sacred musical forms played at religious festivals, funerals, ritual ceremonies, and local carnivals. From an early age, Totó learned the Afro-Colombian rhythms of chandé, mapalé, fandango ...