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Eddie S. Meadows

Allen, Henry “Red” (07 January 1908–17 April 1967), trumpeter, was born Henry James Allen, Jr., in Algiers, Louisiana, the son of Henry James Allen, Sr., a trumpeter and leader of a brass band, and Juretta (maiden name unknown). Allen received instruction from his father and his two uncles, who were also trumpeters. Rehearsals were held at home, giving Allen the opportunity to hear New Orleans greats like Louis Armstrong, Buddy Bolden, Oscar Celestin, Bunk Johnson, King Oliver, Sam Morgan and Kid Rena Though surrounded by trumpet players Allen played the violin and the alto horn before he settled on trumpet Soon after his tenth birthday he felt secure enough on the trumpet to become a member of his father s brass band Allen learned improvising by playing along with recordings He varied the speed to change the key thereby developing a ...

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Barry Kernfeld

jazz trumpeter, was born William Alonzo Anderson Jr. in Greenville, South Carolina. Nothing is known of his parents, who died when he was four. Anderson grew up in Jenkins' Orphanage in Charleston, where as a boy he received the nickname “Cat” after scratching and tearing in a fight with a bully. He played in the orphanage's renowned bands, beginning on trombone and playing other brass and percussion instruments before taking up trumpet. From 1929 onward he participated in orphanage band tours, and in Florida in 1933 he formed the cooperative Carolina Cotton Pickers with fellow orphanage musicians. Returning to Charleston in 1934, they continued playing as the Carolina Cotton Pickers and then resumed touring.

Independent of the orphanage, Anderson held his first lasting affiliation with the Sunset Royals (c. 1936–1942). From 1942 to 1944 he worked in the big bands of Lucky Millinder; the trumpeter Erskine ...

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Barry Kernfeld

Anderson, Cat (12 September 1916–29 April 1981), jazz trumpeter, was born William Alonzo Anderson, Jr., in Greenville, South Carolina. Nothing is known of his parents, who died when he was four. Anderson grew up in Jenkins’ Orphanage in Charleston, where as a boy he received the nickname “Cat” after scratching and tearing in a fight with a bully. He played in the orphanage’s renowned bands, beginning on trombone and playing other brass and percussion instruments before taking up trumpet. From 1929 onward he participated in orphanage band tours, and in Florida in 1933 he formed the cooperative Carolina Cotton Pickers with fellow orphanage musicians. Returning to Charleston in 1934, they continued playing as the Carolina Cotton Pickers and then resumed touring.

Independent of the orphanage Anderson held his first lasting affiliation with the Sunset Royals c 1936 1942 From 1942 to 1944 he worked in the big ...

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Guthrie P. Ramsey

(b Coatesville, PA, Aug 17, 1928). American composer. Born into a musical family, he began piano study with his mother at the age of five and formed his first touring jazz ensemble at the age of 13. He studied at West Virginia State College (BMus 1950), Pennsylvania State University (MMusEd, 1951), the Cincinnati Conservatory (summer 1954) and the University of Iowa (PhD 1958). His teachers included Edward Lewis, Ted Phillips, P. Ahmed Williams, George Ceiga, T. Scott Huston, Phillip Bezanson and Richard B. Hervig, among others. He also attended the Aspen Music School (summer 1964), where he studied with Milhaud. His teaching appointments include positions in the North Carolina public schools and at West Virginia State College (1955–6), Langston University (1958–63) and Tennessee State University, Nashville (1963–9). From 1969 to 1971 he served as ...

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Leonard L. Brown

musician, composer, arranger, teacher, scholar, and humanitarian, was born Thomas Jefferson Anderson in Coatesville, Pennsylvania, the only son and eldest of three children born to Thomas Jefferson Anderson Sr., a college professor and school principal, and Anita Turpeau Anderson, a teacher. Anderson's early years were spent in Washington, D.C., and Cincinnati, Ohio. His mother was a pianist who accompanied singers in church. She was his first musical mentor, providing encouragement from a very early age through music lessons on violin and trumpet.

Anderson attended James Monroe Elementary School in Washington, D.C., where he conducted a rhythm band and impressed Esther Ballou a city supervisor of music who told his mother the musical world will hear from your son He later attended Benjamin Banneker Junior High in Washington D C It was during his time in Washington that he discovered the Howard Theatre and the big bands of ...

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was born on 4 April 1928 in Santa Clara, Cuba, in the province of Las Villas, located north of Cienfuegos and near the island’s center. His family included several talented musicians; his father was a trombonist, and his first cousin Benny Moré was one of Cuba’s most popular singers. Armenteros began performing before the age of 20 with the vocalist and bandleader René Álvarez and his group Conjunto Los Astros. In 1949 in Havana, Arsenio Rodríguez asked Armenteros to join his ensemble, a group known for pioneering the celebration of previously disparaged Afro-Cuban elements of Cuban music. Armenteros contributed compositions as well as performances, developing an improvisational language that draws on both Afro-Cuban vocal styles and jazz phrasing and harmony. His prolific compositional portfolio and formidable improvisational skills garnered him singular fame among audiences and his peers.

One of the most prolific musicians in twentieth century Latin music Armenteros performed ...

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James Dapogny

(b New Orleans, Aug 4, 1901; d New York, July 6, 1971). American jazz trumpeter, singer and bandleader.

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Kathy J. Ogren

One of the twentieth century's premier jazz musicians, Louis Armstrong was born in poverty in New Orleans. He first learned to play brass instruments in Joseph Jones's Colored Waifs' Home. His skills matured in settings where ensemble jazz improvisation first evolved, including street parades, dance halls, and Fate Marable's Mississippi riverboat band. Armstrong's considerable influence as a jazz pioneer began with membership in the bands of Edward (“Kid”) Ory (1918) and Joseph (“King”) Oliver (1922), with whom he first recorded in 1923. Armstrong also collaborated with blues musicians like Bessie Smith.

A virtuoso trumpet soloist, Armstrong through his Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings (1925–1928) disseminated jazz improvisation to a wide audience. His initial success was followed by fame as a band leader and vocalist; beginning in 1929, he fronted his own bands, including Louis Armstrong's All Stars (1947 ...

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Karl Rodabaugh

jazz cornet player, trumpeter, and vocalist. Louis Armstrong's musical style and charismatic personality transformed jazz from a “raucous” and “vulgar” regional form of dance music into an internationally beloved popular art form. Also known as “Satchel-mouth” and “Pops,” Armstrong first gained renown as an innovative cornet player and trumpeter whose creative energy helped bring about the movement of jazz into swing in the 1920s. But he also achieved fame as a vocalist whose distinctive style, including some specific features identified as “Afro-American,” influenced scores of jazz singers and thus played a significant role in shaping popular music of the twentieth century.

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Frank Tirro

jazz trumpeter and singer, known universally as “Satchmo” and later as “Pops,” was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of William Armstrong, a boiler stoker in a turpentine plant, and Mary Est “Mayann” Albert, a laundress. Abandoned by his father shortly after birth, Armstrong was raised by his paternal grandmother, Josephine, until he was returned to his mother's care at age five. Mother and son moved from Jane Alley, in a violence‐torn slum, to an only slightly better area, Franklyn and Perdido streets, where nearby cheap cabarets gave the boy his first introduction to the new kind of music, jazz, that was developing in New Orleans. Although Armstrong claims to have heard the early jazz cornetist Buddy Bolden when he was about age five, this incident may be apocryphal. As a child, he worked odd jobs, sang in a vocal quartet, and around 1911 bought a ...

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More than anyone else, Louis Armstrong was responsible for legitimizing and popularizing jazz for a wider public. A much-admired jazz trumpeter and gravel-voiced vocalist, Armstrong was also a consummate entertainer, steadily expanding his career from instrumentalist to popular singer, to film and television personality, and, ultimately, to cultural icon. He acquired many nicknames throughout his life, including Dippermouth, Pops, and Satchelmouth—the latter often contracted to Satchmo. As Satchmo, he was instantly identifiable around the world, decades before PrinceMadonna, or Sting. The international appeal of his music in effect made Armstrong the American goodwill ambassador to the world.

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Scott Yanow

was born on 28 April 1911 in Havana, Cuba. Bauzá, whose musical talent was immediately obvious, began studying music at the age of 5. Four years later, when he was 9, he played clarinet with the Havana Philharmonic as a guest soloist. At 13 he officially joined the philharmonic on bass clarinet.

Adding the alto sax and bassoon to his repertoire, Bauzá quickly gained a strong reputation as a versatile and technically skilled musician. In 1925, at the age of 14, he traveled to New York, where he made his first recording, performing Cuban music with Antonio María Romeu’s Charanga band. He also had the opportunity to hear American jazz performed live for the first time. In 1927 Bauzá graduated from Havana s Municipal Conservatory He worked during the late 1920s with Los Jóvenes Redención a group that also included the singer Machito Frank Grillo whom he had ...

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James Sellman

Mario Bauzá was a talented multi-instrumentalist whose greatest musical achievement lay in his prominent role in the founding of Afro-Latin Jazz. Prior to his 1930 departure for New York City, Bauzá had concentrated on classical music, playing oboe and clarinet in the Havana Philharmonic. But in the United States he found his true calling as a jazz musician. In 1932, while working in Noble Sissle's band, Bauzá began to perform on trumpet, and he went on to serve as a trumpet player and the musical director for Chick Webb's big band (1933–1938). Bauzá, who had always been impressed with Ella Fitzgerald, helped convince the initially skeptical Webb of Fitzgerald's great potential as a vocalist.

Later Bauzá played trumpet with bandleaders Don Redman (1938–1939) and Cab Calloway (1939–1941 Bauzá played a major role in convincing Calloway to hire the brash ...

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John Harris-Behling

jazz trumpeter, composer, and cofounder of the Art Ensemble of Chicago, was born William Lester Bowie Jr. in Frederick, Maryland, and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, the eldest son of the cornetist W. Lester Bowie Sr. and Earxie Lee Willingham, who worked for the Social Security Administration. Bowie came from a musical family; in 1911 in Bartonsville, Maryland, his grandfather founded the Bartonsville Cornet Band, which included several uncles; his father directed school bands in Little Rock, Arkansas, and St. Louis; and his brothers Byron and Joseph became professional musicians. As a baby Bowie played with his father's cornet mouthpiece, at five he started playing the trumpet, and as a teenager he joined the musicians' union and worked regularly with St. Louis R&B musicians like Albert King and Ike Turner.

In spite of his early musical success Bowie did not expect to make music his life and after ...

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Suzanne Cloud

jazz trumpeter, composer, arranger, and educator, was born Cecil Vernon Bridgewater in Urbana, Illinois, into a family of musicians. His mother, Erma Pauline Scott Bridgewater, was the daughter of Ramon Mack Scott, who sang, played saxophone, piano, and drums, and led a band called Mack Scott and the Foot Warmers, in which Erma played piano for a time. Bridgewater's father, Cecil Bernard Bridgewater, played trumpet in the U.S. Navy band during World War II, and he was stationed at Great Lakes Naval Base with other African American musicians such as Clark Terry, Marshall Royal, Jerome Richardson, and others. Bridgewater's grandfather, Preston Bridgewater, played trumpet and cornet professionally with the circus.

When Cecil Bridgewater was a student at Marquette Grade School in Champaign Illinois the school s band director noticed his potential and encouraged his parents to find a private trumpet teacher for ...

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Born in Wilmington, Delaware, Clifford Brown, also known as Brownie, received his first trumpet from his father at age thirteen. He took lessons in trumpet, music theory, harmony, piano, vibraphone, and bass. When he was eighteen Brown enrolled in Delaware State College (now Delaware State University), to major in mathematics. After one semester, he switched to Maryland State College (now University of Maryland Eastern Shore) to study music, soon starring in the college band. He made brief appearances in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, playing with fellow trumpeters Miles Davis, Kenny Dorham, Dizzy Gillespie, and his hero and later close friend Fats Navarro. A serious car accident in June 1950 kept Brown in the hospital for nearly a year.

Returning to music in 1952, Brown worked first with Chris Powell's Blue Flames, a Rhythm and Blues band He then briefly played and recorded with ...

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Milton Stewart

trumpeter, was born in Wilmington, Delaware. Brown's parents' names are unknown. Brown's father was a self-taught musician who played the trumpet, violin, and piano for his own amusement. He kept several instruments around the house. Young Clifford eventually picked up the bugle and demonstrated an aptitude for it. At age twelve Clifford was taken by his father to study with the renowned Wilmington teacher and bandleader Robert Lowery. Clifford spent three years with Lowery, studying jazz harmony, theory, trumpet, piano, vibraphone, and bass and playing in Lowery's big band.

Brown's father bought Brown a trumpet in 1943, the year he entered high school. He studied the trumpet with his high school band director, Harry Andrews, who had done advanced brass study at the University of Michigan. Brown became an outstanding trumpet player under Andrews s tutelage He perfected octave jumps developed a beautiful range and ornamented ...

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Scott Yanow

jazz trumpeter, was born Donaldson Touissant L’Ouverture Byrd II in Detroit, Michigan. His father was both a minister for the Methodist Church and a musician. Byrd studied at Cass Technical High School and, while still a teenager, performed with Lionel Hampton. During 1951–1953 he was in the U.S. Air Force, where he had the opportunity to play with military bands. After his discharge, he finished earning a degree in Music from Wayne Street University in 1954. Byrd moved to New York in mid-1955, where he earned a master's degree in music education from the Manhattan School of Music.

Very busy as a trumpeter as soon as he arrived in New York, Byrd worked with pianist George Wallington, Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers (during part of 1956) and drummer Max Roach. He also co-led the Jazz Lab with altoist Gigi Gryce.

At that time ...

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Jack Sohmer

jazz trumpeter, was born Thomas Carey in Hahnville, Louisiana, a small town west of New Orleans. Nothing is known of his parents, but of seventeen siblings, five of his brothers, including the legendary trombonist and bandleader Jack Carey, were also musicians. His first instruments were drums, guitar, and alto horn, but around 1912 he started playing cornet, working in his brother Jack's ragtime marching band and other similar groups. In 1914, along with the clarinetist Johnny Dodds and the bassist Pops Foster, he played in the trombonist Kid Ory's band and in 1917 toured with Billy and Baby Mack's Merrymakers revue in a group that included Dodds and the pianist Steve Lewis. After leaving the Merrymakers, on the suggestion of the cornetist King Oliver Carey took a job with the clarinetist Lawrence Duhé s Original Creole Band at the Pekin Café in Chicago but not ...

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Benny Carter, who performed into his nineties, stands unrivaled among jazz musicians for the length of his career and the scope of his contributions. There have been other nonagenarians in jazz: pianist and composer Eubie Blake performed publicly until 1981, when he was ninety-eight; trumpeter Doc Cheatham played at Washington, D.C.'s Blues Alley the weekend before his death in 1997 at age ninety-one; and into his late nineties Benny Waters was still playing energetic, jump-style alto saxophone. But none of these musicians can match Carter's more than seventy-year musical career. Not only was Carter continuously active, he strongly influenced fellow musicians through his improvisations, arrangements, and overall musicianship and professionalism.

Best known—along with Johnny Hodges as one of the two great alto saxophonists of the swing era Carter was an exceptionally versatile musician A superb soloist on trumpet he also recorded on tenor soprano and C melody saxophones ...