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Rachel L. Jones Williams

conservationist, landscaper, and the first African American forester in the United States, was born in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, the fifth of six children born to Alcinda (Dickson) a homemaker, and the Reverend John Calvin Brock, an educator and minister in the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. Reverend Brock was a veteran of the Civil War, serving as quartermaster sergeant of Company F of the 43rd Pennsylvania Regiment. The Brock family moved throughout south central and south eastern Pennsylvania, settling in West Chester, Pennsylvania, around 1890. Four of the six Brock children (including Ralph) were known to be college educated and active in the community. Maria L. (8 May 1879–1968) taught in the West Chester School District for over thirty years; she was the English and Elocution teacher of the civil rights campaigner, Bayard Rustin and bequeathed the family home to the Charles A Melton Arts ...

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Norman Weinstein

landscape architect and educator, was born in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, where his father was a career army serviceman, and grew up in Charlotte, North Carolina. In 1981 he earned his BS degree in Landscape Architecture at North Carolina A&T State University, where he came under the mentorship of Charles Fountain. Fountain impressed upon Hood the need to judiciously balance a love of art with a strong sense of social responsibility and emphasized that, as a minority landscape architect, he should seek novel ways to improve environmental conditions for marginalized populations. Hood's attraction to graduate study at the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned master's degrees in Architecture and Landscape Architecture in 1989, was a logical consequence of Fountain's influence. Garrett Eckbo was also a major source of inspiration for Hood and also emphasized the social responsibility of landscape architects Although Eckbo had retired from ...