1-20 of 49 results  for:

  • Clarinetist x
  • Performing Arts x
Clear all

Article

Jack Sohmer

Bailey, Buster (19 July 1902–12 April 1967), jazz clarinetist and saxophonist, was born William C. Bailey in Memphis, Tennessee. Nothing is known of his parents. He attended the Clay Street School in Memphis, where he began studying clarinet at age thirteen. In 1917 he turned professional after joining the touring band of famed blues composer W. C. Handy, and it was during a trip to New Orleans with Handy that he first heard authentic jazz. In early 1919 he left Handy to move to Chicago, where he studied with Franz Schoepp, first clarinetist with the Chicago Symphony, and worked in Erskine Tate’s Vendome Theatre Orchestra and doubled in Freddie Keppard’s small jazz band at the Lorraine Gardens. In late 1923 or early 1924 Bailey replaced Johnny Dodds in King Oliver s Creole Jazz Band for an extensive tour that concluded with its return to the ...

Article

Jack Sohmer

jazz clarinetist and saxophonist, was born William C. Bailey in Memphis, Tennessee. Nothing is known of his parents. He attended the Clay Street School in Memphis, where he began studying clarinet at age thirteen. In 1917 he turned professional after joining the touring band of the famed blues composer W. C. Handy, and it was during a trip to New Orleans with Handy that he first heard authentic jazz. In early 1919 he left Handy to move to Chicago, where he studied with Franz Schoepp, first clarinetist with the Chicago Symphony, and worked in Erskine Tate's Vendome Theatre Orchestra and doubled in Freddie Keppards's small jazz band at the Lorraine Gardens. In late 1923 or early 1924 Bailey replaced Johnny Dodds in King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band for an extensive tour that concluded with its return to the Lincoln Gardens in June 1924. In August ...

Article

Charles Blancq

jazz clarinetist, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of Theogene V. Baquet, a cornetist, music teacher, and leader of the Excelsior Brass Band of New Orleans, and Leocadie Mary Martinez. Achille was the younger brother of the clarinetist George Baquet. No information exists about the extent of Achille Baquet's formal education; however, he was probably exposed to some musical instruction at an early age by virtue of his musical family. Nevertheless, like so many other New Orleans musicians of that period, he was initially an “ear” musician before he began lessons with Santo Juiffre at the Orpheum Theater in New Orleans.

Later, while still a young man, Baquet developed a reputation of his own as a teacher of music fundamentals. Achille Baquet was both a successful teacher and an instrumentalist and was known to have been active both in early jazz bands and in ...

Article

Charles Blancq

jazz clarinetist, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of Theogene V. Baquet, a music teacher and the leader of the Excelsior Brass Band of New Orleans, and Leocadie Mary Martinez. Baquet and his younger brother, Achille Baquet, were descendants of “downtown” Creoles, whose musical training was closely allied to the traditions of the French musical conservatory—a musical tradition held at that time to be far superior to that of the “uptown” jazz musicians. At age fourteen, Baquet was already playing E-flat clarinet with the Lyre Club Symphony Orchestra, a Creole ensemble with twenty to thirty pieces, directed by his father. Baquet later received additional training from the legendary Mexican-born clarinetist Luis “Papa” Tio, who, with his nephew Lorenzo Tio Jr., was among the founding members of the New Orleans school of clarinetists, a group that included Johnny Dodds, Albert Nicholas, Omer Simeon ...

Article

was born in Trinidad in the West Indies on 7 February 1914. His father’s work in the oil industry resulted in the family moving to Maracaibo, Venezuela, when he was quite young. It was while he was in Venezuela that Barriteau first heard the clarinet and expressed a desire to play music. After his father’s death, Barriteau returned to Trinidad before his tenth birthday and was sent to an orphanage when he was 12.

At the home, Barriteau first began seriously playing music. He originally performed on the tenor horn with the Belmont Orphanage Band, also learning the E-flat clarinet. During 1933–1936 he turned professional working with the Trinidad Constabulary Band where he switched to the more conventional B flat clarinet and the alto sax Barriteau gained local acclaim performing with the popular police band in particular for his clarinet playing He also worked during the same period ...

Article

James Lincoln Collier

(b New Orleans, May 14, 1897; d Paris, May 14, 1959). American jazz soprano saxophonist and clarinettist. He took up the clarinet as a young boy and studied sporadically with the older clarinettists Lorenzo Tio jr, Big Eye Nelson and George Baquet, but was principally self-taught. By about 1910 he was working with some of the incipient black jazz bands in New Orleans, but around 1916 he left the city to wander (a habit which stayed with him into middle age), playing in touring shows and carnivals throughout the South and Midwest. He arrived in Chicago in 1917 and played with bands led by the New Orleans pioneers Freddie Keppard, King Oliver and Lawrence Duhé.

In 1919 Bechet was discovered by Will Marion Cook who was about to take his large concert band the Southern Syncopated Orchestra to Europe The orchestra played mainly ...

Article

Jack Sohmer

Bechet, Sidney (14 May 1897–14 May 1959), jazz soprano saxophonist and clarinetist, was born Sidney Joseph Bechet in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of Omar (or Omer) Bechet, a shoemaker and amateur flutist, and Josephine Michel. An incorrigible truant, after age eight he stopped attending school and started teaching himself clarinet. What basic education he later received came from private tutoring by a cousin. He received some clarinet training from George Baquet, “Big Eye” Louis Nelson, and Lorenzo Tio, Jr. Born with perfect pitch and an infallible musical memory, Bechet could duplicate anything he heard, and, as a result, he never learned to read music. He started playing professionally almost immediately, and his first jobs were with his brother Leonard’s Silver Bells Band and the Young Olympians, a group he formed with Buddy Petit around 1909. In 1911 (or 1913) he started playing with Bunk Johnson ...

Article

Salim Washington

clarinetist, soprano saxophonist, and composer, was born Sidney Joseph Bechet, the youngest of five sons and two daughters (three other children died in infancy) born to Omar Bechet, a shoemaker, and Josephine Michel in New Orleans, Louisiana. Bechet was raised as a middle-class Creole at the time when state law reclassified Creoles of color as Negro. The adoption of the black codes and de jure segregation had profound repercussions for the first generations of ragtime and jazz musicians in the Crescent City. Although Sidney spoke French in his childhood household and his grandfather, Jean Becher, was free and had owned property since 1817, Sidney Bechet identified himself as African American.

The Bechet family was decidedly musical Sidney s father played the flute and trumpet for relaxation and Sidney s brothers all played music as a hobby and developed skills in various trades for their ...

Article

James Sellman

Although well known to Jazz listeners and critics, Sidney Bechet has never enjoyed the reputation of his only peer, cornet and trumpet player Louis Armstrong. Yet in recent years Bechet has gained greater recognition, at least from jazz scholars and critics. For example, Barry Singer, in a 1997New York Times article, described him as an “intrepid musical pioneer who was not merely Louis Armstrong's contemporary but in every way his creative equal.”

In many respects, the two men shared much: They were near contemporaries, born and raised in New Orleans and both were virtuosos on their chosen instruments Both were known above all as improvisers as soloists rather than bandleaders composers or arrangers Various factors help account for Armstrong s greater renown His clarion like trumpet moved even nonmusicians while Bechet s facility on woodwinds was less visceral in effect Armstrong found his greatest popularity as ...

Article

Bruce R. Carrick

jazz musician, was born Albany Leon Bigard in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of Alexander Louis Bigard and Emanuella Marquez. Little is known of his family except that it produced musicians: his older brother Alex was a drummer, his uncle Emile was a violinist who played with musicians like King Oliver and Kid Ory, and his cousin Anatie (“Natty”) Dominique was a trumpet player and bandleader. Bigard studied clarinet under Lorenzo Tio Jr., whose students included Johnny Dodds, Albert Nicholas, Omer Simeon, and Jimmie Noone.

Raised mostly by his grandparents, Bigard worked in the cigar factory of his uncle Ulysses as a boy and also as a photoengraver, and he played music mostly with parade bands. At the age of sixteen, however, Bigard joined Albert Nicholas's band as a tenor saxophonist. He continued playing the tenor with other New Orleans bands, including Luis ...

Article

Bruce R. Carrick

Bigard, Barney (03 March 1906–27 June 1980), jazz musician, was born Albany Leon Bigard in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of Alexander Louis Bigard and Emanuella Marquez. Little is known of his family except that it produced musicians: his older brother Alex was a drummer, his uncle Emile was a violinist who played with musicians like King Oliver and Kid Ory, and his cousin Anatie (“Natty”) Dominique was a trumpet player and band leader. Bigard studied clarinet under Lorenzo Tio, Jr., whose students included Johnny Dodds, Albert Nicholas, Omer Simeon, and Jimmie Noone.

Raised mostly by his grandparents Bigard worked in his uncle Ulysses s cigar factory as a boy and also as a photoengraver and he played music mostly with parade bands At the age of sixteen however he joined Albert Nicholas s band as a tenor saxophonist He continued ...

Article

Ronald P. Dufour

composer and multi-instrumentalist specializing in alto saxophone and contrabass clarinet, was born in Chicago to Clarence Dunbar Braxton Sr., a railroad worker, and Julia Samuels Braxton. Braxton experienced a rich childhood centered in Chicago's Washington Park neighborhood. His parents and his stepfather, Lawrence Fouche, imbued Braxton and his siblings with values of tolerance and perseverance. Exposed to a wide range of popular media, Braxton developed an early interest in rock and roll, particularly Chuck Berry and Frankie Lymon, and he sang in his Baptist church's choir. He had begun to play clarinet at about the age of eleven, and in high school became interested in jazz and the alto sax. In 1959 he entered the Chicago Vocational High School, in part because of his interest in technology.

Through his teens Braxton studied both jazz and European classical music at the Chicago School of Music of Roosevelt University ...

Article

Anthony Braxton was born in Chicago, Illinois. He began playing music when he was about eleven years old and took up the clarinet in high school. He briefly studied music and philosophy at Roosevelt University in Chicago before enlisting in the army, where he played clarinet and alto saxophone in army bands. After returning to Chicago, he became interested in the music of alto saxophonist and Free Jazz innovator Ornette Coleman, saxophonist John Coltrane, and others. This interest led him to join the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) in 1966 and to dedicate himself to avant-garde jazz.

In 1969 Braxton and AACM colleagues violinist Leroy Jenkins and trumpeter Leo Smith formed the Creative Construction Company and moved to Paris, France. The group soon broke up, however, and in the following year Braxton joined keyboard player Chick Corea's group Circle. In 1972 Braxton ...

Article

Scott Yanow

jazz and klezmer clarinetist, was born in New York City. His father was a mailman who also played bass in a calypso band, while his mother was a pianist. When he developed asthma as a child, Byron was advised to play a wind instrument as therapy. Despite its being long out of fashion, he chose the clarinet. He was encouraged by his parents to learn about many different kinds of music, and he followed that advice throughout his career. He considered his early inspirations to be clarinetists Jimmy Hamilton (from Duke Ellington's orchestra), Tony Scott, and Artie Shaw, but by the time he began his career, he mostly sounded like himself.

Byron studied classical clarinet in high school. While attending the New England Conservatory, he studied with arranger George Russell in the Third Stream Department and for a time was a member of Gunther Schuller ...

Article

Scott Yanow

jazz clarinetist and educator, was born in Fort Worth, Texas. Carter studied clarinet and alto saxophone as a youth. He earned a bachelor's degree from Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri, in 1949 and a masters in music education from the University of Colorado in 1956.

Carter spent thirty-three years earning his living as a school teacher. He taught in Fort Worth's public schools from 1949 to 1961 and in the Los Angeles school system from 1961 to 1982. Having this important day job gave him the freedom to play whatever music he desired without having to earn a living from performing. Carter never compromised his music yet sought to educate audiences about what he was playing.

While originally inspired on the clarinet and alto saxophone by Charlie Parker and Lester Young, Carter made the acquaintance of alto saxophonist Ornette Coleman in the late 1940s ...

Article

Elliott S. Hurwitt

alto and tenor saxophonist, clarinetist, flutist, bandleader, arranger, composer, music teacher, and one of the leading jazz musicians in Los Angeles since the early 1940s, was born William Marcell Collette in Los Angeles, California. He was the son of Willie Hugh Collette, who came from Knoxville, Tennessee, and drove a garbage truck. Both he and a brother dabbled in music. Collette's mother, Goldie Marie Dorris came from Kansas City and sang in church She had a degree in cosmetology but was primarily a homemaker Collette had an older sister Doris and a younger brother Patrick As a child he took piano lessons but rebelled against further lessons on the instrument after coming under the sway of big band recordings which inspired him to take up the saxophone Collette bought his first horn at the age of eleven using money he made shining ...

Article

Luis Pullido Ritter

was born on 16 August 1917, in the working-class neighborhood of Santa Ana in Panama City, Panama. The names of his parents are not recorded, but it is known that his father was a shoemaker. His interest in music started early, and as a young man of 16 he played the clarinet at the Panama Firemen’s Hall, a popular venue. When he was 22 years old, he composed his first major work, Capricho interiorano (1939). According to the Panamanian conductor Jorge Ledezma Bradley (2012), the piece is a “reinvention of the mejorana,” the popular folk music of Panama’s peasantry. In 1943 prior to leaving Panama to continue his studies at the University of Minnesota Cordero studied under the Panamanian musicians Herbert de Castro and Alfredo de Saint Malo both children of immigrants from the Caribbean island of Curaçao who had received their ...

Article

James Sellman

Born in Havana, Cuba, Paquito D'Rivera entered the Havana Conservatory in 1960, where he studied woodwinds. Two years later he began playing professionally. During his mandatory military service, D'Rivera played in an army band. He then joined the Orquesta Cubana de Musica Moderna (OCMM) and in 1973 became a founding member—along with Chucho Valdés and Arturo Sandoval—of the Afro-Cuban jazz rock ensemble Irakere, Cuba's most popular Jazz group. In 1980 D'Rivera defected to the United States, settling in New York City, where he worked with Dizzy Gillespie and pianist McCoy Tyner and started his own band. In 1989 he joined Gillespie's last group, the United Nation Orchestra, made up in equal numbers of African American and Latin American jazz musicians, for a tour of Europe and the United States. D'Rivera led the ensemble after Gillespie's death in 1993.

D Rivera plays alto saxophone in a ...

Article

Marcus B. Christian

The names of Edmond Dédé's parents are not known, but they arrived in New Orleans, Louisiana, from the French West Indies, probably in 1809. Although Dédé had at first learned to play the clarinet in his youth, he was known as a violinist for the thirty years that he lived in New Orleans. He began the study of this instrument under the guidance of free black musician and teacher Constantin Deberque, one of the conductors of the Philharmonic Society, an antebellum organization consisting of more than one hundred white and black musicians of New Orleans. After studying under Deberque, he continued his studies under Ludovico Gabici, who was at one time head of the St. Charles Theater Orchestra. With the rise of hostile white public sentiment against the free black people between 1830–1840 Dédé continued his studies in Mexico where a number of his compatriots also ...

Article

Pamela Lee Gray

composer, violinist, and conductor, was born in New Orleans to parents who were free Creoles of color. His father and mother were originally from the French West Indies but immigrated to the United States in approximately 1809 as part of the mass political exile during that period His father was a professional musician who worked as a bandmaster for a local military unit As a child Dédé studied the clarinet and then began playing the violin His teachers were Ludovico Gabici and Constantin Debergue Debergue was director of the Philharmonic Society established by the free Creoles of color in the area he was also a violinist which may account for Dédé s particular affection for that instrument Gabici an Italian was one of the earliest music publishers in New Orleans and the director of the Saint Charles Theater orchestra Dédé was schooled in music by many ...