1-20 of 407 results  for:

  • Performing Arts x
  • 1972–present: The Contemporary World x
  • Composing and Conducting (Music) x
Clear all

Article

Anne Elise Thomas

Egyptian composer, musician, and film star, was born in the early 1900s, either in Cairo or in the village of Abu Kibir, Sharqiya Province. There is confusion regarding both the date and the place of his birth. Two official identification cards in his possession listed his birth in 1910 but in the two different locations named above. ʿAbd al-Wahhab’s contemporaries have suggested that he was born sometime between 1896 and 1907 their suggestions are supported by reported incidents of his early musical life and encounters with important historical figures of the 1910s His early years were spent in the Bab al Shaʿrani quarter of Cairo where his father Muhammad Abu ʿIsa ʿAbd al Wahhab was shaykh religious scholar and caretaker of the neighborhood mosque ʿAbd al Wahhab was one of five children born to his father and Fatima Higazi his mother Early on ʿAbd al Wahhab was enrolled by ...

Article

Mussie Tesfagiorgis

Eritrean Tigrinya singer and performer, songwriter, instrument player, and music composer, was born in the city of Asmara. During the Eritrean war of liberation (1961–1991), Abraham Afewerki and his family, like hundreds of thousands of other Eritreans, sought refuge in Sudan.

Abraham Afewerki became attracted by music and musical instruments at an early age. As a young child, he started playing famfam harmonica and singing at school events As a young boy with great artistic potential he joined the Qeyyahti Embaba Red Flowers of the Eritrean People s Liberation Front EPLF at the age of twelve The Red Flowers was a cultural troupe composed of young artists who performed cultural and revolutionary music and theater within Eritrea in areas controlled by the EPLF and Sudan A branch of the troupe of which Abraham Afewerki was a member was active in Khartoum By writing and composing his own ...

Article

Margot Lieth-Philipp

(b St Thomas, VI, Nov 4, 1889; d St Thomas, VI, Nov 24, 1987). American bandmaster, composer and educator. He taught himself to play the flute and piccolo, took correspondence courses from several universities, and received the BMus degree from the University Extension Conservatory of Music, Chicago. In 1910 he formed Adams’ Juvenile Band, which was incorporated into the US Navy when it assumed the administrative duties of the US Virgin Islands in 1917. He was editor of the band department of Jacobs’ Band Monthly (1913–17), the Virgin Islands correspondent for the Associated Press, and the author of articles for various music journals, newspapers and magazines. From 1918 to 1931 he supervised the music programme in the Virgin Islands public schools, modelling it after similar programmes on the mainland. After retiring from the navy in 1947 he produced musical ...

Article

Claudius Fergus

was born in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas (now the US Virgin Islands) on 4 November 1889. He was the son of Jacob Henry Adams, a carpenter, and Petrina Dinzey, a tailor, and followed their career trajectory as part of the community’s black artisanal class. He served apprenticeships in the trades of carpentry and shoemaking.

With only a primary education and no formal school of music on the islands, Adams studied in the United States. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania as well as Carnegie Hall’s School of Music Theory in New York. Unable to sojourn long enough in the States, Adams completed his study of music by correspondence, a mark of distinction of the self-motivation that shaped his life. He attained a bachelor’s degree in music from the University Extension Conservatory of Chicago in 1931.

Adams organized his first musical band in 1904 and launched his ...

Article

David Simonelli

was born Oliver Anthony Stephens on 22 April 1927 in Santiago, Cuba, to a Jamaican father and a Cuban mother. One of six brothers, he spent his early childhood in Cuba, speaking Spanish; over the years, he learned Italian and French as well, and his multilingual singing abilities would contribute to his international marketability as a pop singer. His father moved the family back to Kingston, Jamaica, in 1938, where Stephens absorbed many different styles of music over the radio and in the streets—American rhythm and blues heard over New Orleans radio stations broadcast across the Caribbean, the hits of jazz crooners from the United States and Britain, and mento, the local guitar and horn version of calypso in Jamaica. In 1942, at age 15, he sang in a major local talent show Vere John’s Opportunity Hour, winning and collecting 2 pounds; he entered Opportunity Hour ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

His father, Benjamin, was an accountant and his mother Molly (née Ekere) was a teacher and a singer, and the family belonged to the Ibibio ethnic group, chiefly resident in Akwa Ibom state in southeastern Nigeria. Akpabot taught himself to play piano when he was young. After he graduated from primary school, he moved to Lagos, where he enrolled at King’s College secondary school, which was known for its classical musical education. Akpabot also sang treble in the choir of the Anglican Cathedral Church of Christ until 1949, and he worked under Thomas Ekundayo Phillip, a skilled educator who ran the choir and taught the singers about Western classical choral music. Once he graduated from King’s College, he worked as a sports reporter for the Lagos Daily Times. During his secondary school days, Akpabot had starred on the soccer field.

In 1949 he left the choir and ...

Article

Philip Herbert

Nigeriancomposer, organist, and ethnomusicologist born in Uyo, Akwa Ibom state, Nigeria, in 1932. In his early education at King's College, Lagos, and as a chorister at Christchurch Cathedral, in that city, he was exposed to European classical music, Mendelssohn being his favourite composer. His musical outlook was eclectic, and he was involved in dance bands such as the Chocolate Dandies and the Akpabot Players (his own band), formed in 1949, as well as being organist at St Saviour's Anglican Church in Lagos.

Akpabot studied the trumpet and organ in London at the Royal College of Music in 1954, with teachers such as John Addison, Osborn Pisgow, and Herbert Howells. Study at the University of Chicago yielded a Master's degree in Musicology, and he also received a Ph.D. from Michigan State University. He was a broadcaster for the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation (1959 ...

Article

Christine Gangelhoff

was born in Kingston, Jamaica, on 30 September 1949. Her mother, Doris Monica Mills Alberga, was an academic who founded a high school in Jamaica. Her father, Christopher Gerald Alberga, managed a factory. Both parents enjoyed musical activities non professionally: her mother played the piano and violin and sang; her father played clarinet.

Alberga grew up in an intellectual and creative environment. Her family lived on the campus of her mother’s high school, where she was exposed to the classics and the sound of piano lessons from an early age. She took up the piano herself at the age of 5 and had the early dream of becoming a concert pianist. While still young, she began composing music and taught herself to play guitar. She performed both with the Jamaican Folk Singers and with Fontomfrom, an African-dance troupe. In 1970 Alberga won the Biennial West Indian Associated Board ...

Article

Mariana Isabel Lorenzetti

who specialized in jazz. Some sources (e.g., Ortega, 2007) give his date of birth as 20 February 1909, in the locality of Machagai, Chaco Province, in the far north of Argentina. Others (e.g., Gaffet, 2002) record his birthplace as the city of Resistencia, Chaco’s capital. Oscar Alemán was the son of Marcela Pereira—of the indigenous Qom, or Toba people—and of the amateur guitarist Jorge Alemán Moreira, who was born in Uruguay. He was the fourth of seven children in his family.

Alemán began to explore the world of music at a very young age, mostly through self-instruction. According to the family of the musician Guilldermo Iacona, at 6 years old, in 1915, Oscar belonged to a group called Moreira Sextet, along with his father and siblings Rodolfo, Carlos, Jorgelina, and Juana (Iacona et al., 2012 As a member of that group he delivered his ...

Article

Michael J. Bustamante

was born on 27 February 1927 in Havana into a working-class family with twelve children. After completing the eighth grade and working as a bricklayer, Almeida was introduced to political activity in 1952 upon meeting Fidel Castro while employed at the beach club for students of the University of Havana. A veteran of the failed 1953 assault on Santiago de Cuba’s Moncada Barracks, and prisoner of the Fulgencio Batista government until May 1955, Almeida returned to Cuba in late November 1956 from exile in Mexico, along with other insurgents of the 26th of July Movement, aboard the yacht Granma. Together with Fidel Castro and his brother, Raúl, as well as Ché Guevara and Camilo Cienfuegos, Almeida was among the few rebels who survived initial clashes with Batista’s forces and arrived at the Sierra Maestra in eastern Cuba. In early 1958 he was promoted to Comandante Commander the ...

Article

Sonia Fuentes Resto

was born in Bayamón, Puerto Rico, on 8 May 1934, to Alberto “Titi” Amadeo, a popular composer, and Vicenta Rodríguez. Miguel and his older brother Ramón were raised by their mother, who was a seamstress and homemaker. Miguel was only about a year old when his father left the family to return to New York City full-time, where he had been living on and off since 1927. In the late 1920s, the Puerto Rican music scene in New York was exploding, with Rafael Hernández, Pedro Flores, and Manuel Jiménez making a name for themselves as composers and performers. Alberto Amadeo became an accomplished songwriter himself, with many popular Latin American stars recording his songs. Miguel, however, had no relationship with his father, and although he seemed to inherit his musical talent from him, his father’s success would offer him no entrée into the industry.

After World War II ...

Article

Guthrie P. Ramsey

(b Coatesville, PA, Aug 17, 1928). American composer. Born into a musical family, he began piano study with his mother at the age of five and formed his first touring jazz ensemble at the age of 13. He studied at West Virginia State College (BMus 1950), Pennsylvania State University (MMusEd, 1951), the Cincinnati Conservatory (summer 1954) and the University of Iowa (PhD 1958). His teachers included Edward Lewis, Ted Phillips, P. Ahmed Williams, George Ceiga, T. Scott Huston, Phillip Bezanson and Richard B. Hervig, among others. He also attended the Aspen Music School (summer 1964), where he studied with Milhaud. His teaching appointments include positions in the North Carolina public schools and at West Virginia State College (1955–6), Langston University (1958–63) and Tennessee State University, Nashville (1963–9). From 1969 to 1971 he served as ...

Article

Juliet Montero Brito

was born in the Padre de Miguel suburb of Rio de Janeiro on 1 March 1949. He is married to Fatima Santos and has two daughters, Vania and Tania. From a very young age Aragão took an interest in music and in 1976 he moved to Cacique do Ramos, a block in Rio where a distinct style of samba music, pagoda or samba caciqueana, had emerged.

In Portuguese, the word “pagoda” means party, a reunion of family and friends where dancing and singing samba takes place. Cacique do Ramos was the place where pagoda as a cultural movement started in 1960 and the block was founded in 1961, whose leader is Ubirajara Felix do Nascimiento, popularly known as Bira Presidente Bira with other famous musicians like Arlindo Cruz and Jorge Aragão among others gathered on the streets and spontaneously began to play a new style of ...

Article

was born on 4 April 1928 in Santa Clara, Cuba, in the province of Las Villas, located north of Cienfuegos and near the island’s center. His family included several talented musicians; his father was a trombonist, and his first cousin Benny Moré was one of Cuba’s most popular singers. Armenteros began performing before the age of 20 with the vocalist and bandleader René Álvarez and his group Conjunto Los Astros. In 1949 in Havana, Arsenio Rodríguez asked Armenteros to join his ensemble, a group known for pioneering the celebration of previously disparaged Afro-Cuban elements of Cuban music. Armenteros contributed compositions as well as performances, developing an improvisational language that draws on both Afro-Cuban vocal styles and jazz phrasing and harmony. His prolific compositional portfolio and formidable improvisational skills garnered him singular fame among audiences and his peers.

One of the most prolific musicians in twentieth century Latin music Armenteros performed ...

Article

Born in the Las Villas province of Cuba, Alfredo “Chocolate” Armenteros became a master of the island's distinctive, horn-led musical musical styles. As a horn-player, composer, and arranger, he contributed to the development of modern Afro-Latin popular music.

Armenteros is a virtuoso player of the trumpet and the flügelhorn. He is also the last surviving master of Cuban septeto music, which is performed by a small ensemble featuring a trumpet backed by stringed instruments and percussion. He has played in many Latin American musical genres, including Afro-Latin Jazz big bands, small-group Cuban Descargas (jam sessions), and Salsa Music. On the 1979 album Knockdown Calypsoes. Armenteros convincingly re-created the sound of the Calypso bands of Trinidad in the 1930s and 1940s. Armenteros's trumpet-playing is instantly recognizable. Rather than seeking harmonic complexity or intricate rapid-fire melodies, typical of jazz trumpet playing since the Bebop era he projects a ...

Article

of Afro-Uruguayan culture, was born in Montevideo on 26 December 1942. His parents were Fausto Arrascaeta, a recognized candombe dancer and gramillero, and María Estela Tabárez. He completed primary school and three years at the Escuela de Artes Aplicadas (today known as Escuela de Artes y Artesanías Dr. Pedro Figari). He was accepted to study for a business license at the Universidad del Trabajo del Uruguay (UTU). His training as a percussionist started at a very young age, under the influence of family members and neighbors. He married María Dolores García (who died in 2001), and they had three children: Adriana, Alejandro, and Rosana. In 2003 he met Irma Pereyra, with whom he began a relationship.

Arrascaeta was raised in the “Charrúa” tenement, a house where many Afro-Uruguayan families lived. Located in the Barrio Cordón Sur, this tenement at Calle Charrúa 2026 maintained the candombe tradition ...

Article

Carlos Vázquez Cruz

was born Álvaro José Arroyo González on 1 November 1955 in the coastal city of Cartagena de Indias Colombia various iconic the son of Guillermo Arroyo and Ángela González El Joe as he is also known grew up in a humble family in a marginal neighborhood of Cartagena where he started singing at the age of 8 in the school choir At the same time he accepted a proposal from the saxophonist and bandleader Michi Sarmiento to start singing with orchestras in the bars and brothels of Tesca one of Cartagena s red light districts to earn money to support his household Cartagena was an important port and the city s nightlife scene catered to lots of international visitors with live entertainment With his rare voice and musical creativity Arroyo soon found this job opening up opportunities for him to join several groups He began his professional singing career ...

Article

Cynthia Tse Kimberlin

Ethiopian ethnomusicologist, composer, scholar, and teacher, was born in Addis Ababa. His paternal grandfather was Liqe Mekuwas Adinew Goshu, a renowned hero of the Battle of Adwa and a close confidant of Empress Taitu. His great grandfather, Dejazmach Goshu, served as a mentor and teacher to Emperor Tewodros. The most creative and artistic individual in his family was his mother, Fantaye Nekere, who composed verse and poetry. She taught Ashenafi about Ethiopian artistic forms, which he later drew upon for his work.

Ashenafi first showed an interest in music while attending Haile Selassie I Elementary School. After attending the Harar Teachers’ Training School, he taught music at Haile Sellassie I University and the Addis Ababa YMCA before obtaining his BA in Music (1962 from the University of Rochester s Eastman School of Music in the United States He returned to Addis Ababa to serve as the first official ...

Article

Joel Gordon

leading male vocalist of his generation in Egypt, composer and box- office sensation with a career spanning five decades, was born in Suwayda, a village in the Druze stronghold of Southern Syria. He was the eldest child of Fahd al-Atrash, an Ottoman official related to the leading Druze princely clan and Alia al-Mundhir, a Druze from Beirut. At the end of World War I, Fahd al-Atrash was posted in the Turkish district of Demirci. Fearing arrest, he fled with his family to Beirut; on the sea passage from Izmir, Alia gave birth to a daughter, Amal, whose fame as the musical artist Asmahan would equal, if not surpass, her older brother’s.

In 1923 against her husband s will Alia took her children to Damascus and then to Cairo She fled the violence that had followed the bombardment of the Druze stronghold in response to an attack on French forces ...

Article

Christina Accomando

William Attaway was born 19 November 1911, in Greenville, Mississippi, to Florence Parry Attaway, a teacher, and William Alexander Attaway, a physician and founder of the National Negro Insurance Association. When he was five, his family moved to Chicago, taking part in the Great Migration that he later chronicled as a novelist. The family moved to protect the children from the corrosive racial attitudes of the South.

Attaway's early interest in literature was sparked by Langston Hughes's poetry and by his sister who encouraged him to write for her theater groups. He attended the University of Illinois until his father's death, when Attaway left school and traveled west. He lived as a vagabond for two years, working a variety of jobs and writing. In 1933 he returned to Chicago and resumed his schooling, graduating in 1936. Attaway's play Carnival (1935 was produced at the ...