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Charles Edward Wiles

first black marine officer and distinguished educator, was born in Hamlet, North Carolina, the son of a Methodist minister. Little is known of his parents or his early education, but he was educated in New York state public schools and attended Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, until he was drafted into the U.S. Marine Corps in 1943 Branch completed basic training at the segregated Marine Corp Recruit Depot for black recruits known as Montford Point located on a desolate portion of Camp Lejeune in North Carolina Following basic training Branch served overseas as part of the Fifty first Defense Battalion a supply unit stationed on a Pacific island near the International Dateline While in the Pacific Branch applied to the navy s V 12 commissioning program for college draftees and was accepted After participating in the V 12 program he attended the Sixteenth Platoon Leaders Class at the Marine ...

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Charles Edward Wiles

Medal of Honor recipient, was born in Macon, Georgia, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon N. Davis. Always an active youth Davis enjoyed outdoor activities, fishing in particular. Later, at Macon's Peter G. Appling High School, he played basketball and football, was a member of the school band, and played the clarinet. He graduated on 29 May 1961.

Davis enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps on 31 August 1961. He reported to U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Training Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, where he was a member of the First Recruit Training Battalion. Upon graduation Davis attended Individual Combat Training at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, as a member of the Second Battalion, First Infantry Training Regiment. He completed Individual Combat Training in February 1962 Davis continued his tenure at Camp Lejeune and joined Company K Third Battalion Second Marines Second Marine Division Fleet Marine Force ...

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Glenn Allen Knoblock

US Marine Corps officer and the first female and African American officer to command the Marine Corps base at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, was born in Laurinburg, North Carolina, the daughter of Roscoe Hodges Jr., a mechanic and army veteran, and Ollie (Monroe) Hodges, a seamstress. In 1962 the Hodges family moved to Bridgeport, Connecticut, where better job opportunities prevailed. In 1972 Hodges graduated from Bassick High School in Bridgeport and then earned a bachelor of arts in Recreation and Leisure at Southern Connecticut State College in 1977 She then started graduate school but soon tired of this and worked at several jobs including church secretary before she considered enlisting for military service She first considered the Navy and Air Force but found out that there were then no opportunities available for female recruits due to quota restrictions Interestingly she had never even considered the Army and Marine Corps ...

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Glenn Allen Knoblock

Marine Corps noncommissioned officer and veteran of World War II, Korea, and the Vietnam War, was born in Gadsden, Alabama. His parents' names are unknown, but his father was a veteran of World War I who died in 1926, and his mother worked as a domestic. When she became ill in 1935 Edgar dropped out of school to support his family by working at a steel mill. Like many black families living in Alabama during this era of Jim Crow segregation, the Huffs lived in constant fear of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). In recounting how a neighbor was kidnapped by the KKK and nearly beaten to death, Huff would later recall that “Whenever the Ku Kluxers would come, I would be terrified…. I just don't see how black people survived down there in those days” (Terry 148 In the early days of World War ...

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Adam R. Hornbuckle

was born George Lawrence James in Mount Pleasant, New York, the son of Martha James; his father’s name is unrecorded. James began participating in track and field in seventh grade and continued at White Plains High School in White Plains, New York. Coached by Ed Kehe, he demonstrated all-around ability in the sport, especially in the 180-yard low hurdles, 330-yard intermediate hurdles, 220- and 440-yard dashes, and the triple jump. In 1966 James won the 180-yard low hurdles at the New York Public School State Championships and belonged to the 880-yard and mile-relay teams which established national high school records of 1:24.5 and 3:12.7 respectively.

After graduating high school in 1966, James entered Villanova University near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Ineligible to compete as a freshman, he debuted as a sophomore indoors at the 1968 Millrose Games in New York City s Madison Square Garden James won the 500 yard ...

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Glenn Allen Knoblock

Marine Corps drill sergeant, was born in Mt. Hebron, Greene County, Alabama. At the age of seventeen he enrolled in Stillman College in Tuscaloosa, a Presbyterian institution founded for the training of black ministers. However, the life of a minister was not for Johnson, and in 1923 he joined the U.S. Army. He served for seven years as part of the segregated 25th Infantry Division and was stationed near the Mexican border before he was discharged as a corporal in October 1929. His occupation for the next four years is unknown, but he took the opportunity once again to serve his country when, in 1933, he joined the U.S. Navy, possibly due to financial difficulties as a result of the Great Depression. His enlistment came at a time when the navy had resumed enlisting African Americans after ceasing to do so in 1920 With the navy ...

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Yvonne Latty

U.S. Marine Corps sergeant, U.S. Navy captain, World War II and Vietnam veteran, Montford Point marine, and Iwo Jima survivor, was born in Lumberton, North Carolina, the eleventh and last child and only son of Elizabeth Morrissey and Thomas Matthew McPhatter, a master barber. During the Depression his family lost everything they had in the bank and they struggled for food and clothing. On 19 May 1941 he graduated from high school, registered for the draft, and enrolled at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina, intending to study history. His parents could not afford to pay his tuition so he worked summers and during the school year.

When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941 McPhatter did not want to go to war He was exempted as an only son and had a deferment as a pre theological student because he ...

Article

Christopher Phelps

outspoken Philadelphia civil rights leader, attorney, and city councilman, was born in Yukon, West Virginia, to Alexander Moore, a physician, and Beulah Moore, a teacher whose maiden name is now unknown. A student during the Great Depression, he attended West Virginia State College from 1933 to 1934 and Bluefield State College from 1935 to 1939. He failed the final literature class needed to graduate from Bluefield State, but considered himself its alumnus ever after and took part in its alumni association.

After working in Athens, Georgia, as an insurance salesman, Moore enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1942. He saw combat against the Japanese during World War II in the Pacific. His time in the Marines imbued Moore with discipline, toughness, and command experience, emboldening him to insist on his rights.

In 1946 Moore married Theresa Wyche Lee a Howard University graduate ...