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José Antonio Fernández Molina

was born in Sonsonate, currently located in El Salvador. Nothing is known of his early years, but his later actions and writings show that, despite his ethnic category of mulato, he acquired a cultural capital in writing, law, history, the Bible, and the symbolic figures common in Baroque Spanish literature. Abendaño was recognized as mulato letrado, a highly literate mulatto, at a time when literacy was rare among the African-descended population of Spanish America.

Although he had married Lucia Badillo, also from Sonsonate, by 1765 he already lived in Costa Rica He showed his knowledge of basic law regarding maritime trade in a trial related to a ship s contract This expertise probably came from earlier practice because Acajutla the main port on the Central American Pacific coast was an annex to his birthplace As a literate mulatto he became secretary for Juan José de la Madriz ...

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of an islandwide slave revolt and anticolonial conspiracy, was probably born in Havana, Cuba. Little is known of his early life, but Aponte learned to read and was a gifted carpenter, a trade by which he earned a living. He was also a member of the free colored militia, a Spanish colonial institution created to supplement low numbers of white soldiers in the protection against piracy and coastal raids. Free colored militias provided men of African descent with an opportunity to develop a sense of solidarity along ethnoracial lines and gain social capital, perhaps even prestige. They therefore often came under suspicion from colonial and imperial officials. Aponte participated in a cabildo de nación (African ethnic association) called Shangó Teddún in Havana and was a devotee of the confraternity of the Virgin of Los Remedios. Many free and freed Afro-Cubans joined mutual aid organizations such as cabildos de nación ...

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Jane G. Landers

free barber and captain of the Battalion of Loyal Blacks of Havana, recruited and equipped at his own cost a black battalion to defend the Cuban city against Britain’s surprise attack in 1762. The men of his unit fought under a flag bearing the motto “Victory or Death.” During the American Revolution, Barba and other black troops again fought the British in New Orleans and Pensacola, in The Bahamas, and on Atlantic corsair expeditions.

In 1786 Barba married the wealthy María Isabel Aróstegui who brought a 6 000 peso dowry to the union and they made their home in the Guadalupe neighborhood outside the walled city They had two children and were able to give their daughter María Tranquilina a large dowry when she married Captain Manuel Salazar a member of Barba s battalion Barba s son José Silverio Guadalupe Barba was a carpenter and sublieutenant of the ...

Article

Baptiste Bonnefoy

was born Mariano de la Cruz on 14 September 1749, the illegitimate son of an unknown father and Feliciana Barros, who was described on her son’s baptismal certificate as a parda, a designation commonly applied in eighteenth-century Chile to free men and women of African descent. In 1769, at age 20, he married Josefa Guerrero Morales (1748–1842), a mixed-race slave of Inés Echevarría Portillo.

Barros established his candle making workshop with the financial assistance of someone named José Baeza and with the earnings from this shop he was able to buy his wife s freedom They would ultimately have ten children Barros s status as a master candle maker allowed him to join the black militia a group of free men of African ancestry who were charged with patrolling the city at night and protecting its stores and warehouses He soon became an officer in ...

Article

Jane G. Landers

Haitian revolutionary, was born a slave in Cap Français (or Guarico, in Spanish), on the northern coast of Saint Domingue, in modern Haiti. Spanish documents give his parents' names as Carlos and Diana, and Biassou and his mother were the slaves of the Holy Fathers of Charity in Cap Français, where Biassou's mother worked in the Hospital of the Holy Fathers of Charity, probably as a laundress or cook. Biassou's father's owner and occupation are unknown.

In 1791 Biassou joined Boukman Dutty, a slave driver and coachman considered by the slaves to be a religious leader, and Jean‐François, also a slave from the Northern Plains of Saint Domingue, in leading the largest slave revolt in the Western Hemisphere on–the richest sugar colony of its day, French Saint Domingue. Boukman was killed in November of 1791 only three months into the revolt and Biassou and Jean François assumed command ...

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Pablo Miguel Sierra Silva

Afro-Mexican former slave and captain for Puebla’s mulatto militia during the 1683 pirate raid on Veracruz, also served as a prominent confraternity leader and chile vendor. Felipe Monsón y Mojica’s staggering rise to prominence from slavery to the apex of colonial society is directly related to his influential wife and emancipator, Juana María de la Cruz.

Felipe Monsón was born a slave of partial African ancestry in early-seventeenth-century Puebla de los Ángeles (now Puebla, Mexico), thereby forming part of an exponentially growing mulatto population that served in the city’s elite households and textile mills. His mother was also likely a slave of African descent, and Magdalena Monsón de Mojica, a free mulatto woman, may have been his sister or a close niece. Unfortunately nothing else is known about his immediate family or childhood. At the time of his liberation (sometime before 1660 Monsón was owned by Joseph de Higuera ...

Article

Justin Wolfe

was born in 1683 in the barrio of San Felipe, León, the former colonial capital of Nicaragua, the son of the Spaniard Juan de Padilla and the mulatta Catarina de Mayorga. Mayorga was herself the illegitimate child of Francisco Díaz de Mayorga, a Spanish Creole noble and captain of the Spanish militia of the province of Nicaragua.

Antonio de Padilla resided in San Felipe, a barrio created in 1651, just three decades before his birth, as a separate zone for mestizos, mulattoes, and blacks (castas). The barrio was meant to keep castas out of the Spanish center of the capital while also separating them from the indigenous community of Subtiava, which abutted León. Most such neighborhoods in Spanish America failed to segregate Afro-descendants or to invigorate a distinct identity, but San Felipe benefited from the presence of a mulatto (pardo militia which served as the ...