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Carl V. Hallberg

Isom Dart, also known as Ned Huddleston, was born in Arkansas. Dart's early life is an enigma. Biographical accounts give a lively “Wild West” picture of an itinerant cowboy and occasional gang member based on legend and folklore. What is known is that sometime in the mid-1880s Dart settled in Brown's Hole, an isolated area where the borders of Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah meet. He worked initially for the Middlesex Land and Cattle Company but later found gainful employment on the Bassett Ranch.

Dart was adept at many practical trades but his true calling was as a cowboy His skill in handling horses and the use of the rope soon distinguished him as one of the best cowhands in the region Dart s congenial personality also helped him gain acceptance in social circles He became an adopted member of the Bassett family In time he became quite knowledgeable ...

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Carl V. Hallberg

black cowboy and rustler, also known as Ned Huddleston, was born in Arkansas. Dart's early life is an enigma. Biographical accounts give a lively Wild West picture of an itinerant cowboy and occasional gang member based on legend and folklore. What is known is that sometime in the mid-1880s Dart settled in Brown's Hole, an isolated area where the borders of Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah meet. He worked initially for the Middlesex Land and Cattle Company but later found gainful employment on the Bassett Ranch.

Dart was adept at many practical trades but his true calling was as a cowboy His skill in handling horses and in the use of the rope soon distinguished him as one of the best cowhands in the region Dart s congeniality also helped him gain acceptance in social circles He became an adopted member of the Bassett family In time he became quite ...

Article

Reginald H. Pitts

western outlaw, was born at Fort Concho, Texas, the second of four children of George and Ellen (Beck) Goldsby. Born a slave near Selma, Alabama, Crawford's father George Goldsby was serving a Confederate officer when he ran off to Union lines during the Battle of Gettysburg. When the Civil War ended, he enlisted in the Tenth U.S. Cavalry, eventually becoming that regiment's sergeant major. A Cherokee freedwoman, Ellen Beck was of African, white, and Cherokee ancestry; she also served as a laundress for the cavalrymen. Her marriage to George was not a success, and the couple would soon separate.

Although Crawford Goldsby according to some sources was barely literate from the age of seven he spent three years at the Indian School in Cherokee Kansas and from the age of ten he spent two years at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Carlisle Pennsylvania When Crawford returned home ...

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John Garst

an African American criminal whose fame lives in the ballad John Hardy, was hanged on the order of Judge T. L. Henritze in Welch, West Virginia, for the murder in January 1893 of Thomas Drews, also African American, at a camp of the Shawnee Coal Company near Eckman, McDowell County. He was convicted in Welch on 12 October 1893.

According to a 1925 statement by 67-year-old Lee Holley, a lifelong resident of Tazewell, Virginia, who claimed to have known Hardy well, he “was 27 or 8 when he was hung” (Chappell, 25). He may have been the John Hardy who was born in Virginia, was thirteen years old in 1880, and lived then in Glade Springs, Washington County, Virginia, with his parents, Miles and Malinda Hardy (U.S. Census, 1880 According to Holley he was one of a gang of gamblers about a half dozen ...