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David B. McCarthy

in a pioneering but unsuccessful attempt to desegregate higher education in North Carolina, was born in Durham, North Carolina, the son of Florence Amos and Thomas Henry Hocutt. After graduating from Durham’s Hillside Park High School, he worked in a pharmacy in a nearby city. He then enrolled in Durham’s North Carolina College for Negroes (now North Carolina Central University) while he worked as an assistant headwaiter at the Washington Duke Inn. Hocutt wanted to become a pharmacist, but North Carolina’s only program was at the University of North Carolina (UNC) in Chapel Hill, which had never admitted African Americans.

In 1933 two Durham attorneys, Conrad Pearson and Cecil McCoy, began to strategize about mounting a legal challenge to North Carolina’s segregationist higher education. With the support of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) executive secretary Walter White the lawyers met with several outstanding students in ...

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Charles Rosenberg

in the landmark church-and-state case, Lemon v. Kurtzman, was born in McDonough, Georgia. He was the second of three children born to George Gilbert Lemon, the owner of an undertakers business, later a porter for a wholesale house, and by some reports, owner of a tailor shop, and his wife, Annie F. Lemon. Alton Lemon had an older sister, Edna, and a younger sister, Modestine.

The family moved to Atlanta while he was still a child, where he attended public schools until the tenth grade. Interviewed in 2004 he recalled that city schools opened every day with a prayer or Protestant devotion and it never really registered with me Hudson He was sent for his junior and senior years to a private high school in Lawrenceville Virginia Raised in a Baptist church to which his parents belonged Lemon enrolled at Morehouse College in Atlanta after World War II ...

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Susan M. Reverby and Elizabeth Sims

farmer, civil rights activist, and lead plaintiff in the lawsuit against the government in the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, was born in Notasulga, Alabama, the third child of six children of Lucius and Alma Pollard. The Pollard family owned and farmed their land in the Notasulga area, just outside of Tuskegee, for generations after the Civil War. As with many farmers, they often needed to secure liens, with their animals as the collateral, in order to complete their crop. In the early 1900s the family began to buy more acreage, and by 1908 Pollard s father was farming 160 acres and was the first black man in the county to own a mechanical cotton picker Pollard learned early how to horse and cattle trade and to build upon his family s farming skills He was educated in the Shiloh School one of the earliest Rosenwald schools built ...