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Abdul Karim Bangura

Abu Nasr Muhammad ibn al-Farakh al-Farabi, or Muhammad ibn Muhammad ibn Tarkhan ibn Uzalagh al-Farabi, was born in 870 c.e in Kazakhstan or Persia or Afghanistan Also known in the West as Alpharabius he is considered by many to be the greatest philosopher scientist and musicologist of his era and perhaps one of the greatest Muslim philosophers in all of history As a political philosopher al Farabi sought out answers to many of the most difficult questions facing the Islamic world during his lifetime He questioned the relations between humankind and God the role of the intermediary the influence of the divine law in private life and the limitations of the human mind He went beyond the divine law and searched for humankind s place in the universe and our relationship with nature society and the divine law He inquired about the different types of political institutions ...

Article

Yvonne Maggie

was born Mário Raul de Morais Andrade in São Paulo on 9 October 1893 and died in the same city, at the age of 51, on 25 February 1945. His father Carlos Augusto de Andrade, held various jobs throughout his life, including stints as a typographer, a bookkeeper, clerk, bank manager, and merchant, while also showing a penchant for writing, as a journalist and a playwright, which gained him some notoriety in São Paulo. In 1879 he created the Folha da Tarde, São Paulo’s first evening newspaper. Mário’s mother, Maria Luísa de Almeida Leite Moraes de Andrade, came from an affluent family. His maternal grandfather, an important politician and professor of the renowned Faculdade de Direito de São Paulo (São Paulo Law School), served as president of Goiás Province in 1881.

Andrade did not inherit capital or gain wealth during his lifetime His only property was a ...

Article

Theodore Cohen

was born in the town of Hopelchén, Campeche, on 7 January 1892 to Francisco José Baqueiro and Teodosía Fóster. Probably of Mayan and not of African descent, he was a relative of the famous nineteenth-century Yucatecan musician Chan Chil (Cirilio Baqueiro Prevé). Baqueiro Fóster attended primary school in Hopelchén before moving to Mérida, Yucatán, to continue his education. He learned to play the guitar, mandolin, violin, oboe, and flute, his instrument of choice. In 1921 he moved to Mexico City, and the following year he enrolled at the National Conservatory, where he studied with the renowned musical theorist Julián Carrillo. He later married Eloisa Ruiz Carvalho (1925–1980), a music critic and educator.

Baqueiro Fóster began to make a name for himself during Mexico’s First National Congress of Music in 1926 With fellow Carrillo disciple Daniel Castañeda he argued that Mexican composers could study indigenous music more accurately ...

Article

was born in Trujillo, in northwestern Peru, between 1707 and 1728; his exact year of birth is unknown. He was the son of Magdalena Tirado, who might have been a slave, and Miguel de Herrera, a free man of mixed descent. He defined himself as a pardo, or black man. It has been confirmed that he was a slave belonging to the silversmith Martín de la Cadena, which would explain his last name as well as his knowledge of metalwork; however, during the period of time documented in his biography, José was a free man.

Cadena’s first marriage was to Pascuala Velarde. In 1761 he signed his Cartilla música, a small treatise of musical theory published in Lima two years later. He was imprisoned briefly for debts he acquired in printing the treatise. It is probable that between 1763 and 1767 he might have lived in ...

Article

Curtis Jacobs

was born Geraldine Roxanne Connor in the Paddington area of London, on 22 March 1952, the first of two children born to the black actor, singer, and folklorist Edric Connor and Pearl Nunez, Trinidadian-born immigrants who arrived there in 1944 and 1948 respectively. Her mother was of Portuguese and African ancestry. Connor was born into an artistic, creative household that received many famous visitors. She went to live in Trinidad at age eight, attending Tranquility Primary, the alma mater of Eric Williams, a family friend. Following her success at the Common Entrance Examinations, she attended Diego Martin Secondary from 1963 to 1968, the period during which her parents divorced. She returned to London in 1968.

Connor followed in her father’s footsteps, as she began her academic career in music. She entered the London School of Music in 1974 after which she returned to Trinidad to ...

Article

Nelson Santana

known as the “Father of Dominican Rock,” was born on 21 June 1952 in the town of Maimón, Monseñor Nouel Province, Dominican Republic, to a working-class family. As a youngster, he demonstrated a passion for music. His mother was a spiritual singer and his father played the tres, a six-string guitar divided into three sets of two strings each. Días studied music in Bonao under the tutelage of Juan Zorrilla and Tatán Jiménez. At age 16 he formed his first musical group, Los Chonnys, blending the social, political, and historical culture of rural and urban life. In the early 1970s he left Bonao to study psychology at Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo (UASD) in the capital city, thus developing a sense of social conscience.

The nueva canción chilena New Chilean Song of the 1960s and the Cuban Revolution were movements that resonated throughout Latin America and Spain including ...

Article

Andrew M. Fearnley

musicologist, opera singer, and diplomat, was born Zelma Watson in Hearne, Texas, the daughter of Samuel Watson, a Baptist minister, and Lena Thomas, a domestic worker. Zelma's parents attached a great deal of importance to education. As the former principal of a boarding school, Samuel Watson instilled into each of his six children an understanding of the value of education; until sixth grade their mother taught all the Watson children at home. The Watsons were also keen musicians, and family music-making sessions were a staple of Zelma's early life. As the eldest of the children, Zelma clearly took note of both of her parents' pet projects and made scholarship and song central to her own life.

Due to her father s job as a preacher Zelma s early life was rather peripatetic At age five she moved to Palestine Texas and then to Dallas Texas at ...

Article

Rebecca M. Bodenheimer

was born on 7 May 1918 in Havana. He began his musical studies at the age of 8 at the Municipal Conservatory of Havana. León studied at various national and international institutions and earned several degrees, including a degree in music pedagogy from the University of Havana in 1943, and one in composition from the Municipal Conservatory in 1945, where he studied with such celebrated composers as José Ardévol. He received a grant to study folklore at the University of Chile in 1951, and in 1957 he completed his musical education in Paris with famed composer Nadia Boulanger.

Along with other prominent art music composers such as Ardévol and Harold Gramatges, León formed part of the influential Grupo Renovación Musical, whose goal was to advance and promote contemporary Cuban classical music. He incorporated many elements of folkloric music into his compositions—in his piano composition Akorín for ...

Article

Together with sociologist Fernando Ortiz and anthropologist Lydia Cabrera, Argeliers León is regarded as one of the most influential scholars of Afro-Cuban culture. From 1961 to 1971 he directed the Institute of Ethnology and Folklore of the Cuban Academy of Sciences and taught African art and Afro Cuban ...

Article

was born in the Vere district of the parish of Clarendon, Jamaica, on 28 September 1927 to the teachers Richard James Mahoney Lewin and Asanath Sylvia Lewin. The elder of two daughters, she grew up in the rural village of Hayes in South Clarendon, and was surrounded by music from an early age. Her father was headmaster, choirmaster, and music and history teacher at the village school she attended. Her mother was a staff member at the school, and also played the piano. Lewin was raised hearing a variety of musical styles, including Jamaican folk music and European classical music “from Handel and Mozart, Haydn and Elgar” (Lewin, 2000, p. 4).

Lewin learned to play both the piano and violin at an early age and she won one of the Vere Scholarships to attend Hampton High for Girls an elite grammar school in neighboring St Elizabeth From there ...

Article

John Maddox

was born to Luiz Braz Lopes, a stoneworker, and Eurydice de Mendonça Lopes, a homemaker, in Rio de Janeiro on 9 May 1942. The youngest of thirteen children, he was raised primarily by a man named Camaragibe in what was then the working-class rural area of Irajá in Zona Norte (north of the city center). He went to Maria do Carmo Vidigal and Mato Grosso elementary schools, and then to Escola Técnica Visconde de Mauá, where he began to cultivate samba with his classmate Maurício Theodoro, who composed for the Acadêmicos de Salgueiro Samba School, one of many organizations that performs at Carnival in Rio de Janeiro and cares for the education and well-being of its members.

Lopes studied science at the Colégio Estadual Barão do Rio Branco and law at the Faculdade Nacional de Direito at the Universidade do Brasil National Law School today Universidade Federal do Rio ...

Article

Wallace McClain Cheatham

college professor, musicologist, pianist, and writer, was born Doris Valean Evans in Washington, D.C., the second daughter of Vallean Richardson Evans and Charlie Evans. Her mother worked for the federal government, and her father was a tailor. McGinty, encouraged by her pianist mother to pursue music, began the study of piano at age seven. At age twelve she gave her first public recital. She continued the study of piano with Andres Wheatley in the Junior Preparatory Department at Howard University and played for Sunday school at the District's Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church. Among her treasured mementoes were the dress and shoes she wore to the historic 1939Marian Anderson command performance at Washington's Lincoln Memorial.

Two baccalaureate degrees, in music education and German, were completed at Howard University in 1945 and 1946 respectively McGinty then went to Radcliffe College in Cambridge Massachusetts ...

Article

Cleve McD. Scott

popularly known as “Frankie,” soca and calypso music arranger, Caribbean-jazz pianist, and musicologist, was born in Kingstown, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, in August 1946 to a middle-class family. His father was Arthur McIntosh, son of the politician George Augustus McIntosh (1886–1963). His mother, Belle (née Cordice), was of East Indian ancestry.

After primary school, Frankie attended grammar school, also in Kingstown, from 1956 to 1962. His introduction to music came when he was about 3 years old, with his father teaching him to play the flute. Sent to a private music tutor to study piano, by the age of 9 he was playing for his father’s dance band, the Melotones. In 1960 he formed the Frankie McIntosh Orchestra. In 1966 McIntosh moved to Antigua to work as a schoolteacher; there, he played piano for the Laviscount Orchestra. In 1968 he relocated to the United States ...

Article

Alan West

Fernando Ortiz's intellectual legacy is one of astonishing breadth and erudition. Cuban scholar Juan Marinello has likened him to a third discoverer of Cuba, after Columbus and Humboldt. A Cuban-American critic has called him “Mr. Cuba.” The claim is no exaggeration: he is one of a great line of Caribbean intellectual figures such as Eugenio María de Hostos, José Martí, Pedro Henríquez Ureña, Frantz Fanon, and C. L. R. James.

Along with the work of Lydia Cabrera Ortiz s seminal works deal with the African traditions that have uniquely shaped the identity of Cuban music religion society and culture His major theoretical contribution is in coining the concept of transculturation a term used to describe the rich textured and sometimes bloody encounter between two or more cultures that mutually transforms them It provides a refined framework for understanding the complexity ...

Article

Kimberly L. Malinowski

musicologist and professor, was born in Guthrie, Oklahoma, to William (Bud) Reese and Lenora Smallwood. Reece later changed the spelling of his last name for unknown reasons. During the winter months, while his mother was teaching and completing medical school, Reece lived with his grandparents. His mother later became a practicing physician. His grandfather was a Baptist minister, and Reece described his home as “very correct but not depressingly so.” He credited Guthrie as having an “excellent school system, an equally excellent public library, and a good cultural environment” and these resources helped prepare him for his studies (Bluefieldian, Nov. 1973, 7). In 1921 Reece was baptized and joined a local Baptist church, and in 1925 he graduated from high school.

Reece credited his decision to attend Fisk University to the inspirational Jubilee Singers and to his mother who attended both Fisk University and Meharry ...

Article

Michael A. Antonucci

concert pianist and musicologist, was born Eileen Jackson in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the daughter of Walter Jackson, a musician and chemistry teacher, and Lilla Gibson. She grew up in the Midwest, primarily Chicago, with her mother and two sisters. Her parents divorced when Jackson was eight, but she remained close to her father. Her interest in music was sustained in her mother's South Side home, which was a meeting place for African American musicians and entertainers, most notably Louis Armstrong. Despite her contact with popular and jazz musicians, Jackson's musical training and orientation remained rooted in the traditions of classical European music. A student of works by Bach, Beethoven, and Debussy she played her first piano recital at the age of twelve and performed at Orchestra Hall in Chicago at the age of eighteen She graduated from Lindblom High School in Chicago and at ...

Article

Paula Matthews, Paula Morgan and Jon Stroop

(b Minneapolis, Feb 19, 1920; d Port Charlotte, FL, Oct 13, 2002). Black American musicologist. She attended the Chicago Musical College, studying the piano, and the University of Chicago, where she took the BA in 1940 and the MA in 1941. She then taught at Southern University (1943–5; 1949–51) and was active as a concert pianist (1940–55). She continued her graduate studies under Gustave Reese at New York University, where in 1961 she took the PhD. In 1960 she was appointed to the faculty at Brooklyn College; in 1969 she became associated with York College of the City University of New York, where she was appointed professor of music in 1972. She was made professor of music at Harvard University in 1976 and she served on the AMS board of directors (1974–6 and the editorial ...