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Augustus Dill was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, son of John Jackson and Elizabeth (Stratton) Dill. He received a B.A. in 1906 from Atlanta University, where he was a student of W. E. B. Du Bois. On Du Bois's advice, Dill went on to earn a second B.A. at Harvard University in 1908.

Dill returned to Atlanta to assist Du Bois on his sociological project of documenting all dimensions of black life in American society. From 1911 to 1915 he coedited four major studies. In 1910, Dill replaced his mentor as associate professor of sociology when Du Bois left Atlanta University to found The Crisis, the journal of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In 1913, Du Bois hired Dill as business manager for The Crisis, a post he remained in until 1928 Arrested that year in New ...

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Prentice Herman Polk became interested in photography at a young age. He began studying through a correspondence course which he paid for with ten dollars he was mistakenly given as change for a candy bar at a local store.

Polk attended Tuskegee Institute from 1916 to 1920 and was ...

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Z’étoile Imma

South African journalist, antiapartheid activist, writer, and film producer, was born in the Orlando district of Soweto township in South Africa. Her father, scholar Jonathan Mandlenkosi Sikakane, coauthor of the first English–Zulu dictionary (1972), was son of the prominent African National Congress (ANC) founding member and early black minister of the South African Lutheran Church, the Reverend Absolum Mbulawa Sikakane. Her mother, Amelia Nxumalo, a schoolteacher and seamstress, was descended from Swazi royalty from her maternal side. In her family’s attempt to protect her from the degrading and racist state-mandated curriculum institutionalized by the Bantu Education Act, Joyce Sikakane was sent to primarily private and Catholic schools where she was fortunate to receive a more-balanced and sound education. Upon her graduation from secondary school in 1963 Sikakane refused to attend one of the segregated Tribal Colleges and with the encouragement of her English teacher decided to pursue a career ...