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LaNesha NeGale DeBardelaben

physician and public health provider, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the fourth of five children of Hillard Boone Alexander, a horse trainer, and Virginia Pace Alexander. Born enslaved in 1856 to James and Ellen Alexander in Mecklenburg, Virginia, Alexander's father migrated to Philadelphia in 1880. Alexander's mother was born enslaved in 1854 to Thomas and Jenne Pace in Essex County, Virginia. She and her brother migrated to Philadelphia in 1880. In 1882 Hillard and Virginia were married. A working-class but respectable family, the Alexanders lived in the city's Seventh Ward with their three boys, Raymond Pace Alexander, Milliard, and Schollie, and two girls, Irene and Virginia. Strong family values were instilled in the Alexander children at an early age. Church, education, and a solid work ethic were emphasized in the home. Shortly after the birth of the youngest child in 1903 ...

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Mariana Isabel Lorenzetti

and the first minister of public health of the nation during the government of Juan Domingo Perón, between the years 1946 and 1954, was born on 7 March 1906 in the province of Santiago del Estero. The oldest of eleven siblings, he was the son of Ramón Carrillo, a professor, journalist, and politician (elected as a provincial representative on three occasions), and María Salomé Gómez.

Federico Pérgola (2009) writes that Carrillo attended elementary and high school in his native city, Santiago del Estero, and, according to one of his siblings, Arturo Carrillo (2005) he was an exceptional student from a very early age He took his fifth and sixth grade examinations early and was able to enroll at the age of 12 in the National College of Santiago del Estero He graduated from the institution with a bachelor s degree as well as a ...

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Robert C. Hayden

surgeon, hospital administrator, and civil rights leader, was born in La Grange, Georgia, the son of Ceah Ketcham Wright, a physician and clergyman, and Lula Tompkins. After his father's death in 1895, his mother married William Fletcher Penn, a physician who was the first African American to graduate from Yale University Medical School. Raised and educated in Atlanta, Wright received his elementary, secondary, and college education at Clark University in Atlanta, graduating in 1911 as valedictorian of his class. His stepfather was one of the guiding influences that led to his choice of medicine as a career.

Wright graduated from Harvard Medical School, cum laude and fourth in his class, in 1915 While in medical school he exhibited his willingness to take a strong stand against racial injustice when he successfully opposed a hospital policy that would have barred him but not ...