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Deborah Lois Taylor

neurosurgeon and professor of neurosurgery, was born Alexa Irene Canady in Lansing, Michigan, to Elizabeth Hortense Golden Canady and Clinton Canady Jr. Her father was a graduate of the School of Dentistry at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, and practiced in Lansing. Her mother graduated from Fisk University at the age of nineteen, was active in civic affairs, became the first African American elected to the Lansing Board of Education, and served as national president of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. Canady's grandmother began to teach school at the age of sixteen and taught elementary education at Lane College in Tennessee. Canady married George Davis, a retired naval medical corpsman and recruiter, in 1988.

The Canady family lived outside Lansing on land sold to them by a man who wanted to punish the city for not rezoning his property so that he could not build a gas ...

Article

Mariana Isabel Lorenzetti

and the first minister of public health of the nation during the government of Juan Domingo Perón, between the years 1946 and 1954, was born on 7 March 1906 in the province of Santiago del Estero. The oldest of eleven siblings, he was the son of Ramón Carrillo, a professor, journalist, and politician (elected as a provincial representative on three occasions), and María Salomé Gómez.

Federico Pérgola (2009) writes that Carrillo attended elementary and high school in his native city, Santiago del Estero, and, according to one of his siblings, Arturo Carrillo (2005) he was an exceptional student from a very early age He took his fifth and sixth grade examinations early and was able to enroll at the age of 12 in the National College of Santiago del Estero He graduated from the institution with a bachelor s degree as well as a ...