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Hakim Adi

Early Nigerian nationalist, Pan‐Africanistwriter, and student politician born on 6 November 1884 in Lagos, Nigeria. He first arrived in Britain in 1905 and soon commenced his political activities, eventually giving up his studies at Edinburgh University. Omoniyi sent a series of letters to the British Prime Minister, Campbell‐Bannerman, and other British politicians, including the future Labour Party leader Ramsay MacDonald, demanding political representation for Africans in the colonies and opposing the military campaigns that were still being conducted in Africa.

In 1907 Omoniyi wrote a series of articles criticizing colonial rule in the Edinburgh Magazine and became the first African to write for the Independent Labour Party's Labour Leader. He also published several articles in the West African press. In 1908 his major work, A Defence of the Ethiopian Movement was published in Edinburgh and dedicated to The Right Hourable and Honourable Members of the ...

Article

Charles Cantalupo

Eritrean poet, critic, and scholar, was imprisoned in Eritrea during its war for independence (1961–1991) by both occupying Ethiopian forces and factions of the Eritrean resistance. She escaped to Addis Ababa in the mid-1980s, where she received a high school education before fleeing for France and giving birth to a daughter in Lyon. Moving to Rome, she received a master’s degree in modern languages and literature and a PhD in communication studies from the University of Rome. In 1993, she published a poetry collection, Aulò: Canto-poesia dall’Eritrea, a bilingual text in Italian and Tigrinya.

A first-person narrative written from the standpoint of the author, Aulò: Canto poesia dall’ Eritrea is in four parts: “Il Paradiso Perduto” (“Paradise Lost”), “La Mia Abeba” (“My Abeba”), “La Nuova Eritrea” (“The New Eritrea”), and “Antologia, tentavivi di ricette Anthology an Attempt at ...

Article

Drew Thompson

Angolan opponent of Portuguese colonialism, originally named Deolinda Rodrigues Francisco de Almeida, was born in 1939 in Cateste, Angola, near Luanda. She was the cousin of Agostinho Neto.

The product of a missionary education and the recipient of a Methodist church scholarship, she traveled to São Paulo, Brazil, in 1959, where she studied sociology. Shortly after her arrival, Portugal and Brazil established a treaty that permitted Portugal to extradite individuals deemed subversive or threatening to the stability of the Portuguese state and its colonies. Fearing arrest for her political activities and views, Rodrigues sought asylum in the United States and continued her studies at Drew University in New Jersey. She returned to Angola in 1962 and joined the Angolan Volunteer Corps for Refugee Assistance in Leopoldville Congo later to become the organization s secretary She was an active member of the People s Movement for the Liberation of ...

Article

Shane Graham

justice on the South African Constitutional Court, attorney and legal scholar, author, cultural critic, and human rights activist, was born 30 January 1935 in Johannesburg. The older of two sons born to Emil “Solly” Sachs, a trade union leader, and Ray Ginsberg, his full name was Albert Louis Sachs. Both of his parents were associated with the Communist Party in the 1920s; as Sachs wrote in his 1966 book The Jail Diary of Albie Sachs he grew up in a political home a home of books of ideas and of stimulating people His parents separated when he was young his father stayed in Johannesburg while Albie and his mother moved to Cape Town where she worked as secretary to Moses Kotane a leader of both the Communist Party and the African National Congress ANC Sachs attended South African College Schools an exclusive institution in Cape Town from which he ...

Article

Jessica Falconi

Angolan writer and politician, was born Agostinho André Mendes de Carvalho on 29 August 1924, in the fortified village of Calomboloca, Bengo, in the current province of Bengo, to the east of the capital, Luanda. As he declared, his Kimbundu name was not his pseudonym, but the name by which he was known in his home; it signified “power is odious.”

In the rural areas of Ícolo and Bengo fifty miles eighty kilometers from Luanda he attended primary school to the fourth class at a Methodist missionary school before moving to Luanda There he continued his schooling with the Methodist missionaries who at that time were influential in training future Angolan nationalists such as Agostinho Neto with whom Uanhenga Xitu established a friendship when they boarded together at the mission In Luanda he also took a nursing course He first began to practice his profession as a nurse in ...