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Drew Thompson

Angolan opponent of Portuguese colonialism, originally named Deolinda Rodrigues Francisco de Almeida, was born in 1939 in Cateste, Angola, near Luanda. She was the cousin of Agostinho Neto.

The product of a missionary education and the recipient of a Methodist church scholarship, she traveled to São Paulo, Brazil, in 1959, where she studied sociology. Shortly after her arrival, Portugal and Brazil established a treaty that permitted Portugal to extradite individuals deemed subversive or threatening to the stability of the Portuguese state and its colonies. Fearing arrest for her political activities and views, Rodrigues sought asylum in the United States and continued her studies at Drew University in New Jersey. She returned to Angola in 1962 and joined the Angolan Volunteer Corps for Refugee Assistance in Leopoldville Congo later to become the organization s secretary She was an active member of the People s Movement for the Liberation of ...

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Juanita Patience Moss

slave, Union soldier, and Andersonville prisoner, was born in Windsor, North Carolina, to unknown parents. His surname sometimes appears as Rolack. His physical description was that of a man five feet six inches tall with hazel eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. Though historians have done much to illuminate the roles of black soldiers in black regiments, the U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), little has been done to document the experience and contributions of those who served with white regiments.

When Union regiments penetrated the Southern states to blockade Confederate access to the Atlantic coast for the exchange of cotton and tobacco for European guns and ammunition slaves began to abscond from nearby towns and plantations to seek out the Union troops whose presence promised freedom Not satisfied with being merely paid laborers behind Yankee lines some contrabands like Rolac chose to enlist in the Union army ...