1-20 of 95 results  for:

  • Political Figure x
Clear all

Article

was born 30 December 1936 in the village of Ewouta in the southern coastal Fernan-Vaz region of Gabon, to Anina Germaine, a member of the coastal Nkomi ethnic community. Agondjo-Okawé only met his biological father when he was fourteen years old. His mother, Anina, originally came from the nearby town of Kongo, but had difficulties with having children and turned to an herbalist in Ewouta for help. She later divorced Agondjo-Okawé’s biological father and married Charles Ping, a Chinese immigrant living in Fernan-Vaz. Their son, Agondjo-Okawé’s half-brother, Jean Ping went on to become a major figure in Gabonese politics.

In 1946 Agondjo Okawé s uncle Jean Remy Ayouné decided to have him study at the Roman Catholic mission school of Sainte Anne de Fernan Vaz It was around this time that the young boy witnessed an African colonial guard assault a woman in his village Disgusted Agondjo Okawé learned ...

Article

Charles C. Stewart

Malian political leader and notable Muslim scholar, was the political head of the Timbuktu-area lineage, the Kunta confederation, during the years 1847–1865. He inherited this role from his brother, Sidi al-Mukhtar al-Saghir bin Sidi Muhammad (d. 1847), who had assumed the position from his father in 1824, himself heritor of the influence of the family’s patriarch, his father, Sidi al-Mukhtar al-Kunti (d. 1811). His education in the Azaouad region of Timbuktu encompassed the Islamic disciplines including Arabic language, jurisprudence, and theology. The database of West African writings, West African Manuscripts, provides us with a sense of his intellectual literary productivity: in a sample of 180 manuscript titles there are 47 poems or collections, 41 devotional writings, 33 letters of political polemics, 15 works on Sufism, mainly attacking the Tijaniyya, and 10 juridical decisions. At some point, probably in the late 1820s or early 1830s we know he ...

Article

Carl Campbell

was born in Brandon Hill, St. Andrew parish, Jamaica, on 17 April 1905. His father was David Allen. He attended elementary school from 1912 to 1924, suggesting that he stayed on to become a pupil teacher, possibly to take the certificate examinations, the gateway to teacher training. The first major turning point in his life occurred when he entered the prestigious Mico Training College in 1925. This college was founded in 1836 and had continuously been the island s premier teacher training institution Its entrance exam was highly selective fortunately for Allen he entered at a time when a new principal had just controversially raised the standard of work intending to give graduates a pre university experience Mico taught or encouraged students to take subjects beyond the scope of elementary school including those studied in the pursuit of an intermediate degree at the University of London ...

Article

Thiven Reddy

South African academic, human rights campaigner, and respected veteran of the African National Congress (ANC) in exile, was born in Stanger, a small rural town in what is now KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Asmal was a founder of the British and Irish antiapartheid movements. He was also an academic, who taught law for almost three decades at Trinity College Dublin, during his exile from South Africa.

In the broad array of constituencies and opinions that has historically constituted the ANC, Asmal has consistently stood for liberal constitutionalism and human rights. This position was most strongly associated with the ANC during the latter days of apartheid, when the international solidarity movement, based largely in Western countries, was at its height.

A key member of the ANC s Constitutional Committee during the post apartheid negotiations period Asmal directly influenced the content of the democratic constitution which was hailed internationally as a truly progressive ...

Article

Baqi<ayn>e Bedawi Muhammad

Sudanese intellectual, educator, political leader, and women’s advocate, was born on 1 January 1932 in the city of El Obeid, Province of Kordofan, and raised by an Islamic family. Her grandfather, al-Shaykh Mohammed al-Badawi, was a prominent Islamic scholar, and his house in Omdurman was a gathering place for well-known Islamic scholars from North Africa, such as al-Shaykh Mohammed Abdu of Egypt. Al-Badawi’s father, al-Fatih Mohammed al-Badawi, was a district commissioner who replaced the position of the British officer after Sudan independence in 1956. Although girls’ formal education was boycotted by the masses for being based on Western values, he was an open-minded and progressive individual with liberal ideas regarding girls’ education. In this atmosphere al-Badawi and her two sisters were raised.

As a district commissioner al Badawi s father s moved and worked in different regions of Sudan This situation compelled al Badawi to receive her elementary intermediate ...

Article

Curtis Jacobs

was born on 3 August 1832 in St. Thomas, Danish West Indies (today, the US Virgin Islands). He was the third of seven children born to Romeo Blyden, a tailor, and Judith Blyden, a teacher, a free black married couple in a Danish colony where the majority of Africans were still enslaved. Members of an integrated congregation of the Dutch Reformed Church, the Blydens moved briefly to Venezuela in 1842, where, in addition to discovering an aptitude for languages, Blyden observed that most of the emancipated Africans in that country were not far removed from chattel slavery.

Wilmot became a student of the Reverend John Knox of the Dutch Reformed Church upon his family’s return to St. Thomas in 1844. Impressed with his academic potential, Knox encouraged Wilmot in 1850 to travel to the United States with a view to gaining admission into the Rutgers Theological College ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

educator and politician, was born 17 February 1909 in Kinshasa, then known as Leopoldville, in the Belgian Congo, and now the capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo. His family, which originally came from the town of Umangi near the city of Lisaka in the Equateur Province of northwestern Congo, identified with the Ngombe ethnic community. He received his primary and secondary education from the Catholic Sheut religious fathers from 1919 until 1926. That year he received his teaching license, and then taught at various schools for the next thirty-two years. Bolikango later recalled his experience as a veteran teacher: “I spent 32 years in the mission schools where I earned my pay. I was a teacher. Can you believe I never became the head of a small school in 32 years? But the past is the past” (Artigue 1961 p 46 By the 1940s Bolikango ...

Article

academic and politician, was born on 12 January 1956 in the town of Teke-Kalamba located in the province of Kasai Occidental in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). He belonged to the Kuba ethnic community, known for its strong monarchical tradition, which survived the colonial period. Unlike many Kuba in the colonial era who did not seek out a Western education, Boshab's family pushed their son to further his studies. After he completed his primary and secondary education, Boshab continued to excel at university. He eventually completed a doctorate in law at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium in the early 1980s. Boshab returned to his homeland in 1984 where he worked for two years as a legal representative of the Union Nationale des Travailleurs du Zaïre UNTZA the sole legal trade union under the dictatorship of Mobutu Sese Seko His career moved in several new ...

Article

Katya Leney-Hall

Egyptian diplomat, jurist and scholar who, during 1992–1996, served as the sixth Secretary-General (SG) of the United Nations (UN), the first African and Arab to hold the position, was born in Cairo on 14 November 1922 into a distinguished Coptic Christian family. His grandfather, Boutros-Ghali Pasha, was the Egyptian minister for finance and, from 1894, foreign affairs. He was prime minister from 1908 to 1910 when he was assassinated by a nationalist angered with his advocacy of the extension of the Suez Canal Company s concession Boutros Boutros Ghali pointed out in an interview that the reality was that the population was happy to get rid of a Christian and his grandfather s assassination set off a wave of Coptic Muslim clashes Although not overtly religious himself his family s history status and influence on the Coptic Church were to form Boutros Ghali who would later perceive ...

Article

Robert Fay

Boutros Boutros-Ghali was born to a prominent Coptic Christian family in Egypt. His grandfather, Boutros Pasha Boutros-Ghali, served as prime minister of Egypt under the British protectorate from 1908 until his assassination in 1910. The younger Boutros-Ghali graduated from the University of Cairo in 1946 with a bachelor’s degree, and went on to earn a doctorate in international law in 1949 from the Sorbonne in Paris. Boutros-Ghali pursued postdoctoral work at Columbia University in New York City, and then assumed a post as professor of international law and international affairs at the University of Cairo. He worked as a journalist, writing for the daily Al Ahram. He also held teaching posts at Princeton University in the United States, and at universities in India, Poland, and Tanzania. In October 1977 Boutros-Ghali left his academic career to serve in the government of Egyptian President Anwar al-Sadat as ...

Article

Carl Campbell

was born in the Jamaican parish of Westmoreland, Jamaica, in 1892. He was the son of James Campbell, a minor civil servant, and his wife Blanche, daughter of a farmer and rural landowner. He received an elementary school education and served as a pupil teacher up until 1913, whereupon he studied for two years as a teacher trainee at Mico College in Kingston.

For young men whose lack of money or social class kept them out of traditional fee-paying secondary schools, the best line of academic career advancement was professional teacher training, and the most prestigious male teacher-training college was Mico College. It was founded in 1836 and had continuously been the island’s premier teacher-training institution. Entry was selective and highly competitive, and its graduates were regarded as skilled elementary schoolteachers of considerable personal integrity. Campbell graduated in 1915 Predictably he soon found himself the headmaster of ...

Article

Leslie R. James

was born on 18 December 1873 in Bailif, Guadeloupe. Candace’s political career was shaped by the political and colonial ethos of the Third French Republic (1870–1940) and intersected with World War I and II. The son of Edouard Candace and Marie Joseph Corvo, Candace was born into a landowning Guadeloupian family. His formative years were spent in Guadeloupe. By eighteen, he was a schoolteacher. After he left Guadeloupe for metropolitan France, he studied at Toulouse (1895–1902) and at L’École de Pau, taught at Pau (1904–1906), and obtained a doctorate in science, then taught at the Professional School of Creil (1910–1911). In 1921, he married Jeanne Marie Binet.

By the end of the first decade of the twentieth century, Candace’s studies, teaching, and related activities formed the prelude to his long, and sometimes controversial, political career. From 1907 to 1909 he ...

Article

Nigel Westmaas

was born on 27 June 1927 in Georgetown, Guyana, to parents Victor Emannuel Carter and Violet Eugene Carter (née Wylde). Carter began his studies at the prestigious Queens College of British Guiana (Guyana) in 1938, graduating in 1944. At Queens, he was president of the Beekeepers Society, and during this formative period of his life, there were no prominent indications of the great poet he was to become.

Throughout World War II Carter was said to have been influenced by the evenhanded flexibility of the British governor, Sir Gordon Lethem. Like many colored Guyanese, he managed to find employment in the civil service like his father, joining it in 1947. After his stint in the civil service, Carter worked as a schoolteacher between 1954 and 1959 at the height of his involvement in anticolonial politics and the emergence of his own poetic voice and legacy.

When the ...

Article

Lawrence Vernon

was born in 1903 in Belize City, Belize. Born Floss Kemp, she was the youngest of seven children. Her father, Joseph Kemp, died when she was 1 year old, and she grew up with her mother Diana Kemp. While receiving her elementary education at Wesley School in Belize City, her sister, a versatile piano player, inspired Floss to take piano lessons, and she eventually became an accomplished piano teacher who taught two of Belize’s greatest musicians and composers: Dr. Colville Young (Belize’s governor general) and the concert pianist Francis Reneau.

On completing elementary school, Casasola entered the pupil–teacher training system, and after being certified as a trained teacher in her early teens she began teaching at Wesley School and then Ebenezer School, both in Belize City. A major hurricane devastated Belize City in 1931 and the years spent in reconstruction also affected Casasola s life as she relocated to ...

Article

Kwaku Larbi Korang

J. E. Casely Hayford (1866–1930) was a lawyer, politician, journalist, cultural nationalist, Race Man, and humanist. He was the most prominent anticolonial activist of his era in the Gold Coast and British West Africa. By philosophical and ideological inclination he was a nativist who scrupulously followed a tradition in African nationalism pioneered by E. W. Blyden What he brought uniquely to that tradition was a willingness and ability to adapt the racial cultural abstractions of Blyden s nativism into a practical political philosophy that could answer the immediate needs of his anticolonial activism in the Gold Coast Yet Casely Hayford shrewdly seeing its potential for a politics of Pan Africanism and for a humanist internationalism also philosophically endorsed Blyden s racialism which the latter grounded in an abstract nativity of Africa that following African American religious and nationalist tradition he termed Ethiopia Casely Hayford has left us ...

Article

David U. Enweremadu

journalist, political leader, and West African nationalist, was born in Cape Coast (present-day Ghana) on 29 September 1866. He was the fourth son of Rev. Joseph de Graft Hayford, a prominent Wesleyan minister, who belonged to the Anona Clan, and Mary de Graft Hayford, the daughter of Samuel Collins Brew, a leading Gold Coast trader. In addition to his European names, he was given the Fante names of Ekra Agyiman, which he rarely used. Following his father, who was one of the founders of the Fante Confederacy in the 1870s, young Joseph imbibed a strong sense of Fante nationalism.

After his secondary education at the Wesleyan Boys high school in Cape Coast 1872 1874 he attended Fourah Bay College in Sierra Leone After that he returned to the Gold Coast Subsequently he served the Wesleyan church as principal of two of its boys secondary schools first in Accra and ...

Article

Joseph Ephraim Casely-Hayford spent his life working for the advancement of Africans in British West Africa. Born into the coastal elite of the Gold Coast (present-day Ghana), Casely-Hayford studied at the Wesleyan Boys High School at Cape Coast and then at Fourah Bay College in Sierra Leone. During his early career he was principal of Wesleyan High School in Accra and later of Wesleyan High School at Cape Coast. In 1885 Casely-Hayford turned to journalism and wrote for the Western Echo, the Gold Coast Echo, and the Gold Coast Chronicle. Although his career would focus on bringing political change to West Africa, he continued to write for the Gold Coast Leader from 1902to1930 . In addition, he wrote the novel Ethiopia Unbound (1911) and the nonfiction work Gold Coast Native Institutions (1903 It was as a politician and activist that Casely Hayford earned renown ...

Article

Malawian nationalist leader, was born in 1930 in Nkhotakota, Malawi. He was the fourth of eight children born to a Malawian mother of mixed Mang’anja and Yao parentage and to Habil Mathew Chipembere, a Yao who became a teacher and then an ordained priest and archdeacon in the service of the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa (UMCA). Chipembere was a top pupil in primary school on Likoma Island, the isolated UMCA headquarters on the eastern reaches of Lake Malawi. He proceeded to Blantyre Secondary School, where he wrote the territory’s best examinations and received a government scholarship to finish his secondary schooling at Goromonzi School in what was to become Zimbabwe.

At Goromonzi, Chipembere also excelled and won an official scholarship in 1951 to attend Fort Hare University College in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa Fort Hare was then among the best higher education institutions on the ...

Article

Owen J. M. Kalinga

Malawi politician lawyer teacher and human rights activist was born in Mzimba district Nyasaland Malawi Both sides of her family were associated closely with Christian missionary work education and politics in the British colony Her paternal grandfather Jonathan P Chirwa was one of the first Africans to be ordained as a church minister in the Livingstonia Synod of the Church of Scotland he served briefly as a missionary at Mwenzo in Northern Rhodesia now Zambia and was to the first African to serve as the moderator of the synod Her maternal grandfather Yesaya Mlonyeni Chibambo was also a distinguished church minister in the same synod a close adviser to the Northern Ngoni paramount ruler Inkosi ya Makhosi M Mbelwa II and a founding member of the Mombera Native Association one of the early African welfare and political organizations in Nyasaland Her uncle Mackinley Qabaniso Chibambo was a prominent political activist ...

Article

Crystal Renée Sanders

educator, administrator, and politician, was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, to the educators John Bias and Frances Lane Bias. Cofield was reared on the campus of the historically black Elizabeth City State Teachers College (now Elizabeth City State University), where her father served as vice principal and later university president. In 1938 she earned an undergraduate degree in elementary education from Hampton Institute (now Hampton University). Five years later she received a master's degree in administration and supervision from Teachers College, Columbia University. In 1941 she married James Edward Cofield, a member of the first four-year graduating class at Elizabeth City State Teachers College. Two children were born of this union, James Jr. and Juan.

Like her six siblings, Cofield was a lifelong educator. She began working as an instructor in 1946 at Shaw University in Raleigh During her forty year career at the oldest historically black ...