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Terence M. Mashingaidze

nationalist politician, first titular president of independent Zimbabwe, statesman, peace broker, clergyman, author, soccer administrator, academic, poet, and journalist, was born on 5 March 1936 at Esiphezini, in Essexvale (now Esigodini) District near Bulawayo in Southern Rhodesia. The versatile Banana’s father, Aaron, was a migrant laborer from Malawi while his mother, Jese, was a Zimbabwean Ndebele woman. Banana married Janet Mbuyazwe in 1961; the marriage produced three sons and a daughter. Banana attended Mzinyati primary school and Tegwani High School. He trained as a teacher at Tegwani Training Institute and then attended Epworth Theological Seminary, resulting in his ordination as a Methodist preacher in 1962 Subsequently he worked as a Methodist schools manager principal chairperson of the Bulawayo Council of Churches and member of the Rhodesian Christian Council and World Council of Churches In the 1970s Banana attained a BA with honors in theology through distance learning from ...

Article

Adam R. Hornbuckle

was born Ato Jabari Boldon on 30 December 1973 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. He is one of two sons of Guy and Hope Boldon. His father is Trinidadian and his mother is Jamaican. Bolden attended Fatima College, a Catholic boy’s secondary school in Port of Spain, until the family immigrated to Queens, New York, in 1988. He played soccer at Jamaica High School in Queens. His coach, Joe Trupiano, recognized Boldon’s running ability and encouraged him to try out for the track team. In 1990 he clocked 10.8 seconds for 100 meters, 21.4 seconds for 200 meters, and 48.5 seconds for 400 meters. He won the 200 and 400 at the Queens County Championships, and finished third in the 200 at the New York State Championships. Later that year, he moved with his mother to San Jose, California. In 1991 the Piedmont Hills High School ...

Article

Paul K. Sutton

was born on 21 September 1901 in Diego Martin, near Port of Spain, Trinidad. His father, Lebrun Constantine, was an overseer on a coconut estate and, according to C. L. R. James (1963), “the most loved and famous cricketer in the island” (p. 103) selected to play for the first West Indian team to tour England in 1900. His mother, Anaise Pascall, was the daughter of slaves.

Learie was intensively coached in cricket by his father from an early age and began playing amateur club cricket for Shannon, the team of the lower black middle class, which was captained by his father, when he was 15. He also attended St Ann’s Government School, Port of Spain, until he was 12; then he attended St. Anne’s Roman Catholic School and captained the cricket team there in 1916 and 1917 during which time only one game was ...

Article

Sports critics and fans hailed Learie Nicholas Constantine as one of the best fieldsmen, hardest batsmen, and greatest bowlers in the history of cricket. This popularity assisted his later political career. He secured a position as a civil servant and later as a peer in Great Britain. He also served in Trinidad as a legislator, minister, and ambassador.

Constantine was born in Trinidad to Anaise Pascal and Lebrun Constantine, a plantation foreman and famous cricketer who played for the West Indian team in England in 1900 and 1906. Learie Constantine played cricket as a boy, but upon his father's advice did not pursue a professional sports career until he had first completed his education at the age of fifteen and gained some experience working in legal services. Finally, he joined the West Indian team and played in England in 1923 and 1928.

In 1929 Constantine ...

Article

Gregg P. Bocketti

was born on 18 July 1892 in São Paulo, to father Oscar, a German immigrant businessman, and mother Matilde, an Afro-Brazilian laundress. A forward, Arthur Friedenreich played his first official game for Sport Club Germânia on 15 July 1909. Germânia, the club of São Paulo’s middle- and upper-class German community, offered Friedenreich access to one of Brazilian soccer’s highest level leagues, from which players of color were normally barred. His navigation of Brazilian soccer’s ethnic and racial politics would help define his career. Arthur and Joana Friedenreich married in 1910 and had one child, Oscar.

Friedenreich played for over a dozen club teams, the longest for Ypiranga (1910, 1913–1915, and 1917), Paulistano (1918–1929), and São Paulo (1930–1935 all clubs of São Paulo s social elite he played his entire career at Brazilian soccer s highest level He also played for select teams that ...

Article

Luke Nichter

dentist, politician, and Negro Baseball League officer, was born in Memphis, Tennessee. A member of a prominent Memphis family with four brothers who all played roles in baseball in that city and beyond, John B. Martin, a dentist, was a co-owner and a club officer of the Memphis Red Sox and the Chicago American Giants. He also served as the president of three different leagues: the Negro Southern League (NSL), the Negro American League (NAL), and the Negro Dixie League.

Together with his brother, B. B. Martin, also a dentist, John B. Martin took over the Memphis Red Sox in the late 1920s from funeral director Robert S. Lewis and built a ballpark they called Martin Stadium Martin also owned a hotel next to the park and operated the concession stand Beyond baseball Martin also served the community as a pharmacist dentist real estate ...

Article

Adam R. Hornbuckle

was born William Samuel Steele in El Centro, California, the only son of Theodore S. Steele and Laura Tompkins. In 1927 the family moved to San Diego and Steele later attended Herbert Hoover High School. In 1941 he won the long jump in 24 feet ¾ inch at the Southern Section of the California State High School Track and Field Championships and finished second at the State Championships in 23 feet 3½ inches. After graduating from high school that same year, Steele enrolled in San Jose State College and joined the track and field team. Coached by Lloyd “Bud” Winter, he won the long jump at the 1942 Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) Junior National Track and Field Championships. His jump of 25 feet 7¼ inches ranked as the longest performance in the world that year. In 1942 Steele also recorded a career best in the triple jump of 47 ...