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Patricia Glinton-Meicholas

was born in 1922 to Charles Darling, an Acklins, Bahamas, fisherman and farmer, who took cyclical work in Panama. Termed “The Bahamas Nazareth” by Sir Arthur Foulkes (eighth Bahamian governor-general of The Bahamas), Acklins was one of the chronically depressed southern islands of the Bahamas archipelago, which forced its people to migrate to Nassau, the capital, or elsewhere in search of work. Charles married Aremilia Johnson, and Clifford, the seventh of their eleven children, was born on 6 February 1922 in Chester’s, Acklins.

Darling’s limited formal education began at Chester’s all-age school and continued at public schools in New Providence. Quietly ambitious, he seized opportunities for learning whenever they appeared. That he was intelligent was evidenced by his appointment as school monitor (pupil teacher) at age 14. His six shillings per month wage was a boon to his family following his father’s death in 1933.

In 1938 Darling ...

Article

Alexander J. Chenault

the first black popularly elected governor of the United States Virgin Islands, Delegate to the United States House of Representatives, and ambassador, was born in Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, to Charles and Maude (Rogiers) Evans. He attended the Christiansted Public Grammar and Junior High schools and completed his secondary education at the Charlotte Amalie High School in St. Thomas, where he graduated as valedictorian of his class.

At the age of nineteen, Evans moved to Washington, D.C., and studied at Howard University, where he graduated magna cum laude in 1940. In 1944 he received his medical degree with honors from the Howard University Medical School. Evans married Mary Phyllis Anderson, a nurse he met while completing his medical internship at Harlem Hospital in New York City in 1945, and they had four sons together: Melvin Herbert Jr., Robert Rogiers, William Charles and ...

Article

Carl Campbell

was born in Kingston, Jamaica, on 25 September 1909, the son of Reverend Theophilus Glasspole, a Methodist minister, and his wife, Florence. Glasspole attended Buff Bay Elementary School in Portland, where he studied between 1914 and 1918. He then attended the Central Branch Primary School until 1922, when he enrolled in the prestigious Wolmer’s Boys School (founded in 1729—the oldest school in the Caribbean).

Though Glasspole had once considered pursuing a career in education upon completing his studies he shifted his interest to law However this training required studying in England which he could not afford Still holding a Senior Cambridge Certificate from Wolmer s had more social prestige in Jamaica than a teacher s degree from Mico Training College and the young Glasspole was able to find a job as a clerk in the civil service at the Registrar General s Office and later at ...

Article

Maxim Zabolotskikh

Ethiopian intellectual, politician, civil servant, diplomat, and writer, was born in June 1884 in Seyya Debr (Shewa, Ethiopia) to a family of Christianized Oromos.

Tekle grew up in his mother’s care until he was five. At the age of six he began to study in a church school. When his elder brother Gebre Sadiq moved to Harar to become a secretary of Ras Mekonnen, Tekle (nine at this time) went with him and continued his education there. He stayed in the household of Ras Mekonnen, where he was raised with other children, among whom was also Teferi (future Emperor Haile Selassie).

When the Italians invaded Ethiopia in 1895, both Tekle and Gebre Sadiq accompanied Ras Mekonnen to the front. Gebre Sadiq was killed, and Ras Mekonnen decided to do something special for his younger brother entrusting him to a member of the Russian Red Cross mission Count ...

Article

Peter Garretson

ruler of Ethiopia’s Gojjam province, was born about 1847 in Jab-Tehnan in Damot. At birth he was named Adal Tesemma and became a dominant figure in the province of Gojjam for most of the late nineteenth century, serving three emperors, Tekle Giyorgis (1868–1871), Yohannes IV (1872–1889), and Menilek II (1889–1913). Yohannes appointed him the first and only crowned King of Gojjam when he took his regal name Tekle Haymanot. Tekle Haymanot’s family largely monopolized the office of governor of Gojjam for most of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

His family had been important in Gojjam s history for many generations and had two major branches that competed for power throughout the nineteenth century His major rival Desta Gwalu was in power when Tekle Haymanot came of age in mid century and he resorted to classic Ethiopian tactics by retreating to the lowlands becoming a bandit shifta to enlarge his band ...