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Emmanuel Asiedu-Acquah

Ghanaian nationalist politician and diplomat, was born on 21 February 1916 in Winneba, a coastal town in the central province of the Gold Coast (present-day Ghana). His father, James Edward Botsio, was the registrar of the colonial district commissioner’s court. His mother, Diana Ama Amina, was a trader. Kojo Botsio was schooled at the local Catholic primary and middle schools before attending the prestigious Adisadel College in the historic city of Cape Coast in 1929. He went on to train as a teacher from 1935 to 1936 at Achimota College, which also trained other future prominent Ghanaian leaders including his long-time political associate, Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first postindependence leader. After his training at Achimota, Botsio taught at the Catholic secondary school of Saint Augustine in Cape Coast for five years.

In the tradition of some educated colonial Ghanaians of the time Botsio studied for his bachelor s degree at ...

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Before he became president of Haiti, Dumarsais Estimé was elected deputy to the National Assembly in 1930 and later served as minister of education in the cabinet of President Sténio Vincent. In his education post, he funded or raised teacher salaries; mandated vaccinations in primary schools; made sports obligatory in all schools, both public and private; and initiated interscholastic sports competitions. In 1946 he was elected president by the National Assembly. Estimé was supported by the black intelligentsia and represented the return to power of the black elite, after the ouster of mulatto president Elie Lescot. Not widely liked at the time he took office, Estimé went on to become one of Haiti's most popular leaders.

As president Estimé launched populist and nationalist reforms in the areas of labor legislation education health care and sanitation He supported projects to attract tourism to the island notably the Universal ...