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Jessica M. Parr

Samuel Gridley Howe was born to a prominent Boston family. His father, Joseph Neals Howe, owned a rope-manufacturing company in this thriving port city. His mother, Patty Gridley, was renowned for her beauty. Howe entered the Boston Latin School at the age of eleven, graduating in 1818. At the age of seventeen he entered Brown University, the only one of the three Howe sons to attend college, owing to a decline in the family's financial situation.

Following Howe's graduation from Brown in 1821, he matriculated at the Harvard Medical School. After he completed his medical studies in 1824, his restless nature and democratic sensibilities led him to join the Greek army as a surgeon and soldier during the Greek war of independence. Howe returned to Boston in 1831, where he met a friend from his undergraduate days named John Dix Fisher. In 1829 Fisher ...

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Marieta Joyner

teacher, activist, and advocate for deaf adults in Raleigh, North Carolina, was born Effie C. Pointer, the daughter of Lucinda Pointer and Benjamin Hinton of Raleigh. Nothing is known about her parents. Between 1897 and 1908 Effie attended elementary school at the Joseph K. Brick School in Enfield and attended the First Congregational Church of Raleigh, which also maintained a school funded by the American Missionary Society. Effie was a committed student, and in June 1908 at age sixteen she was sponsored to go to the Hampton Institute. The identity of the sponsor is unclear, but once at Hampton she completed high school and had a smooth transition into college life. She continued her strong religious and benevolence mission by joining, and later becoming president of, the King's Daughter Society, an organization founded in 1886 in New York City as an international order to encourage the development ...