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Kim Jenice Dillon

Born 16 June 1899 in Boston, Marita Bonner graduated from Radcliffe in 1922 and taught high school in West Virginia and Washington, D.C. She married William Almy Occomy in 1930. While living in Washington, she was a member of the “S” Street Salon, a group of writers who met usually at the home of Georgia Douglas Johnson. Encouraged and influenced by writers such as Johnson, May Miller, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Alain Locke, Countee Cullen, and other major figures of the Harlem Renaissance, Occomy began to publish works that embodied her concern for the deplorable conditions facing African American men and women living in an America characterized by racial, class, and gender inequities.

Occomy published two essays that Elizabeth Brown Guillory describes as those that captured the spirit of the Black Renaissance On Being Young A Woman and Colored which won first ...

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Marita Odette Bonner was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, one of the four children of Mary Noel and Joseph Bonner. She was educated at Brookline High School. In 1922 she graduated from Radcliffe College with a B.A. degree in English and comparative literature. After teaching for two years at Bluefield Colored Institute in Bluefield, West Virginia, she moved to Washington, D.C., where she taught high school until 1930.

As a member of the literary “S” salon in Washington, Bonner met members of the Harlem Renaissance, including poet Langston Hughes, playwright Georgia Douglas Johnson, and writer Jean Toomer. In 1925 Bonner published her first story, “The Hands,” in Opportunity. In the same year, she wrote the autobiographical essay for which she is best known, “On Being Young—A Woman—and Colored.” As a member of Washington's Krigwa Players she wrote three experimental plays: The Pot Maker ...

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Althea E. Rhodes

educator and author, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the daughter of Joseph Bonner, a machinist and laborer, and Mary A. Nowell. Educated in the Brookline, Massachusetts, public schools, Bonner applied to Radcliffe College at the urging of her high school adviser and was one of the few African American students accepted for admission. She majored in English and comparative literature and founded the Radcliffe chapter of Delta Sigma Theta, a black sorority. A gifted pianist and student of musical composition, Bonner won the Radcliffe song competition in 1918 and 1922. Bonner also studied German, a language in which she became fluent. During her last year in college she taught English at a Cambridge high school. After graduating with a BA in 1922, she taught at the Bluefield Colored Institute in Bluefield, Virginia, until 1924 and at Armstrong High School in Washington, D.C., from 1924 to 1930 ...

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Connor Huydic

was born to Lynell Brown Dow and John Dow Sr. Lynell Dow was an educator who began teaching originally at Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana before moving to the City School of East Chicago, Indiana where she taught for forty-one years. Little is known about John Dow Jr.’s early childhood or his father.

Dow attended Indiana State University in Terre Haute, graduating in 1963, with a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology and Physical Education. At about the same time he married Gloria Russell, formerly of Orlando, Florida. In 1968 Dow earned his Master’s Degree in Education with a Counseling Emphasis from Indiana State University. He went on to earn his doctorate degree in Educational Administration from Michigan State University in 1972 with a dissertation entitled A Comparative Study of Inner City Elementary Teachers and Principals Perceptions of and Role Expectations for the Leadership Behavior of Selected Inner City ...

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Jessica M. Parr

Samuel Gridley Howe was born to a prominent Boston family. His father, Joseph Neals Howe, owned a rope-manufacturing company in this thriving port city. His mother, Patty Gridley, was renowned for her beauty. Howe entered the Boston Latin School at the age of eleven, graduating in 1818. At the age of seventeen he entered Brown University, the only one of the three Howe sons to attend college, owing to a decline in the family's financial situation.

Following Howe's graduation from Brown in 1821, he matriculated at the Harvard Medical School. After he completed his medical studies in 1824, his restless nature and democratic sensibilities led him to join the Greek army as a surgeon and soldier during the Greek war of independence. Howe returned to Boston in 1831, where he met a friend from his undergraduate days named John Dix Fisher. In 1829 Fisher ...

Article

Marieta Joyner

teacher, activist, and advocate for deaf adults in Raleigh, North Carolina, was born Effie C. Pointer, the daughter of Lucinda Pointer and Benjamin Hinton of Raleigh. Nothing is known about her parents. Between 1897 and 1908 Effie attended elementary school at the Joseph K. Brick School in Enfield and attended the First Congregational Church of Raleigh, which also maintained a school funded by the American Missionary Society. Effie was a committed student, and in June 1908 at age sixteen she was sponsored to go to the Hampton Institute. The identity of the sponsor is unclear, but once at Hampton she completed high school and had a smooth transition into college life. She continued her strong religious and benevolence mission by joining, and later becoming president of, the King's Daughter Society, an organization founded in 1886 in New York City as an international order to encourage the development ...