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Adam R. Hornbuckle

was born in Laurel, Mississippi, the youngest of ten children born to Peter and Eulalia Boston. His father, who worked as a fireman for the Gulf, Mobile, and Ohio Railroad before losing sight in his right eye, provided for the family by farming, hauling junk, and doing other odd jobs. His mother was a homemaker. As a student at Oak Park High School in Laurel, Boston developed both academic and athletic skills. As quarterback on the football team, he led Oak Park to the African American state high school football championship in 1956. In track and field, Boston excelled in the hurdling, sprinting, and jumping events. As a junior in 1956 he established a national high school record in the 180-yard low hurdles and led Oak Park to the first of two consecutive African American state high school track championships.

After graduating high school in 1957 Boston earned ...

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Adam R. Hornbuckle

was born André Lamar Phillips in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The names of his parents are not recorded, but the family moved to San Jose, California when André was young. He grew up in Meadow Fair, a neighborhood in east San Jose and attended Silver Creek High School. As a high school track and field athlete, coached by Stan Dowell, he won the 300-meter low hurdles at the California Interscholastic Federation State Championships in 1977. That year, Phillips graduated high school and entered San Jose City College. In 1978 he claimed the first of two consecutive California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA) Championship titles in the 400-meter intermediate hurdles and finished second in the same event at the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) Junior National Championships. In 1979 Phillips also won the CCCAA title the 110 meter high hurdles Later that year at the AAU National Championships he recorded a personal ...

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Angela Bates

professional football player, businessman, and historic preservationist, was the youngest of six children born to Fred and Ora Switzer of Nicodemus, an all African American town in northwestern Kansas. He grew up playing football on the dusty dirt streets of Nicodemus. He liked fishing and hunting and especially helping with farm chores. He attended grade school at Nicodemus until the eighth grade and then attended nearby Bogue High School. While in high school he played on the football and basketball teams and ran track. He lettered each year in all three sports.

Upon graduation in 1950, Switzer entered Kansas State University as one of the first African Americans to receive a football scholarship to the university. While at Kansas State he lettered three years in both football and track and was named to the All Big Seven three years in a row. In 1952 Switzer ...

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Adam R. Hornbuckle

and first African American official in the National Football League (NFL), was born Burl Abron Toler in Memphis, Tennessee, to Arnold Toler and Annie King Toler. Burl was one of four children, three sons and one daughter, whose father worked as a Pullman porter and whose mother operated a small store and boardinghouse. Toler attended Manassas High School, a segregated school in Memphis. Despite standing six feet two inches and weighing over two hundred pounds, he did not participate in high school sports because of a severe burn on his arm, which resulted from an accident while disposing of a vat of cooking grease. After graduating from high school in 1946, Toler briefly attended LeMoyne (now LeMoyne-Owen) College in Memphis before an uncle who lived in Oakland, California encouraged him to move to the San Francisco Bay Area to continue his education.

After moving to San Francisco Toler entered ...

Article

Andre D. Vann

university chancellor, track coach, and first African American Olympic head coach and president of the United States Olympic Committee, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the youngest of thirteen children of Willie and Mary Ann Thomas Walker. He was nine when his father died and was sent to Harlem, New York to live with his older brother Joe, who owned several businesses. He later dropped out of school before entering the twelfth grade to serve as a personal valet to bandleader Jimmie Lunceford of the Jimmie Lunceford Band.

He was later persuaded to return to school to complete his last year. He returned to Atlanta and graduated from the segregated Booker T. Washington High School in 1936. A multi-sport athlete in high school and college, Walker received a scholarship and later entered Benedict College in South Carolina, in the fall of 1936 where he was an ...