1-12 of 12 results  for:

  • Early Childhood Educator x
Clear all

Article

Don E. Walicek

was born in The Farrington, a district on the Leeward Caribbean island of Anguilla. Of African descent, her parents were Malcolm Lindbergh Christian and Ann Juliette Christian. Adams attended the island’s Valley Girl’s School and the Valley Secondary School, graduating from high school in 1969, the year British troops invaded Anguilla. Most of the population, which was mainly of African descent, was then engaged in the rebellion now called the Anguilla Revolution, which vehemently opposed Anguilla’s membership in the Associated State of St. Kitts, Nevis, and Anguilla, established as the main form of governance of the three islands in conjunction with British decolonization in the Caribbean. Anguillians believed that the Associated State would be dominated by the larger and quite distant island of St. Kitts.

Adams began writing at the age of 17, at a time when there was little encouragement for writers in Anguilla. From 1969 to 1973 ...

Article

Leticia Franqui-Rosario

was born Wilfred Robert Adams, in Georgetown, British Guiana (now Guyana), the son of Robert Adams, a boat builder. He was educated in Georgetown at St. Stephen’s Scots School, and St. Joseph’s Intermediate. He studied engineering drafting, but then trained as a teacher at the leading British West Indian teachers’ training college, Mico College in Jamaica. After his marriage broke down, he left for England, arriving there in September 1930. Failing to study law because of a lack of the necessary qualifications, he did a number of menial jobs and even became a professional wrestler with the name “The Black Eagle” (there is a 1934 painting by William Roberts of one of his bouts).

Acting then took over. His stage debut, with Paul Robeson in Stevedore, received favorable reviews. A year later he played Jean-Jacques Dessalines to Robeson’s Toussaint Louverture in C. L. R. James’s Toussaint Louverture ...

Article

Danielle Legros Georges

was born Marie-Thérèse Colimon on 11 April 1918, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, to Ana Bayard and Joseph Colimon. Her parents were a middle-class couple who encouraged the intellectual development of their eight children. An avid reader as a child, Colimon-Hall completed primary and secondary school in Port-au-Prince, and at age 14 she entered Haiti’s École Normale d’Institutrices (Teacher’s College). She began her teaching career as a very young woman, and took part in Port-au-Prince’s cultural and literary events, publishing poems under the pseudonym Marie Bec. She later traveled to Europe, with a period of study at France’s Centre de Formation Pédagogique in support of a growing interest in preschool education. She would marry Louis Hall, a poet and educator, later in life.

Among the first to develop training programs in Haiti for early childhood education Colimon Hall began her work in the context of an educational reform movement that followed ...

Article

Zulmarie Alverio Ramos

The Ecclesiastical Archive of Puerto Rico states that Celestina was born on 6 April 1787 and was baptized on 22 April 22 by Father José Antonio Espelera of the Catholic Church in the city of San Juan. It should be noted that the Catholic Church provides baptism, marriage, and death records, which are divided into three volumes: those for whites; those for free blacks, also known as morenos libres; and those for the enslaved. According to the marriage archives of the Catholic Church, there is no evidence that Celestina was ever married, and the death certificate dated 18 January 1862 states that she died at the age of seventy-six and was single, domiciled at San Juan, and a parishioner of the Catholic Church.

Celestina s parents were Lucas Cordero and Rita Molina free blacks who lived part of their lives in the Cabildo of San Juan moved to the ...

Article

Florencia Guzmán

was born on 17 March 1813 in the city of La Rioja, in present day northwestern Argentina. The son of slaves, he benefited from the “libertad de Vientres” (a freedom of wombs law) sanctioned by the Asamblea Nacional Constituyente (National Constitutional Assembly), which declared free, after 31 January 1813, all children born to enslaved mothers.

Del Sacramento was the son of Melchor Sacramento and Magdalena Guzmán slaves belonging to the church of the city of La Rioja By being born free he was able to receive instruction by the clergy in reading and writing and he remained under the tutelage of the Rioja church until he was 20 years old Afterward he dedicated himself to working as an elementary schoolteacher at the Iglesia Matriz as well as the Convento de San Francisco in the same city Because of his noted abilities as a teacher del Sacramento alongside the Dominican ...

Article

Alejandro Gortázar

who has been working in several community projects, and was involved in the creation of the NGO Instituto Raíces Afro, was born on 10 September 1967 in Artigas, a city in the northeast department of Uruguay, on the border with Argentina and Brazil. She is an activist who has worked as a preschool teacher, on a local radio program on the Viva FM station, and participated in different cultural activities in Artigas. Since 2013 Gómez has lived in Montevideo together with her husband and children, and has studied law student at the Universidad de la República. She is the daughter of a Afro-indigenous couple who lived in the countryside of a department far from the capital city and who moved to the city of Artigas. Her parents were religious leaders, and therefore she was raised in a home with an umbanda altar. Her mother practiced vencía an Afro indigenous ...

Article

Charles Rosenberg

sometimes known as Carrie, public school teacher and principal, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as were her parents, James Le Count, a cabinet maker who around 1860 became an undertaker (and still later a general carpenter), and Sarah Beulah Le Count, who does not appear to have worked outside the home. There is no record that she or her parents had ever been enslaved. She had one older brother James, Jr., younger sister Ada, and younger brother William who died at age three.

Her entire family is listed by name in the 1850 census living in the city's Spruce Ward, carved out of a portion of the older Cedar Ward in 1846 running south of Spruce Street to Cedar Street about midway between the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers Her paternal grandparents Joseph and Mary Le Count both born in Delaware and married in Philadelphia lived next ...

Article

Stephen Preskill

Lucy Ellen Moten was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, near White Sulphur Springs, the daughter of Benjamin Moten, a U.S. Patent Office clerk, and Julia Withers. Taking advantage of their status as free blacks, the Motens moved to the District of Columbia when Lucy was only a child to secure the best possible education for their precocious daughter. Lucy attended Washington's pay schools until 1862, when she was admitted to the district's first public schools for African Americans. After attending the preparatory and normal departments of Howard University, Lucy Moten began teaching in the primary grades of the local public schools and taught there continuously, except for a two-year interruption, from 1870 until 1883. In 1873 Moten moved to Salem, Massachusetts, to attend the State Normal School, from which she graduated in 1875.

In 1883Frederick Douglass recommended that Moten be appointed to ...

Article

Stephen Preskill

educator, was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, near White Sulphur Springs, the daughter of Benjamin Moten, a U.S. Patent Office clerk, and Julia Withers. Taking advantage of their status as free blacks, the Motens moved to the District of Columbia when Lucy was only a child to secure the best possible education for their precocious daughter. Lucy attended Washington's pay schools until 1862, when she was admitted to the district's first public schools for African Americans. After attending the preparatory and normal departments of Howard University, Lucy Moten began teaching in the primary grades of the local public schools and taught there continually, except for a two-year interruption, from 1870 until 1883. In 1873 Moten moved to Salem, Massachusetts, to attend the State Normal School, from which she graduated in 1875.

In 1883Frederick Douglass recommended that Moten be appointed to fill the ...

Article

Rayford W. Logan

Born free in Norfolk County, Virginia, Mary Smith Peake lived for several years with her aunt in Alexandria, where she acquired a good education. After the District of Columbia returned Alexandria to Virginia in 1846, Alexandria's schools were closed to blacks; Peake moved to Norfolk with her mother. A period of religious mysticism, stemming perhaps from her vision of service to the poor, led her to participate actively in aiding the poor, assisted by the First Baptist Church of Norfolk. After her mother married Thompson Walker, the family moved to Hampton. There, Peake founded the Daughters of Zion to look after the ill and the needy, as well as to teach children and adults in her home. In 1851 she married Thomas D. Peake, who had been freed from slavery some years before, had served in the Mexican War (1846–1848 and had gone to ...

Article

Tonia M. Compton

educator, was born Mary Smith Kelsey in Norfolk, Virginia, to parents whose names, occupations, and marital status are unknown. Peake's 1863 biographer, Lewis C. Lockwood, described her mother as “a free colored woman, very light” and her father as “an Englishman of rank and culture” (Lockwood and Forten, 6). At the age of six Mary was sent to live in Alexandria, Virginia, in order to obtain an education. She resided with her aunt and uncle, Mary and John Paine, for ten years during which time she received formal schooling and training in needlework and dressmaking. Mary attended two different schools for African American children, where she was under the tutelage of both black and white teachers.

While education for blacks was generally illegal throughout the South Mary was able to receive schooling in nearby District of Columbia Blacks were allowed this right until the adoption of a ...

Article

Charles Rosenberg

school teacher and domestic worker, is best known for a poignant and detailed autobiography that provides a window into daily life for the Americans who were stigmatized legally and socially, during the middle of the twentieth century, by their dark complexion.

Sarah Lucille Webb was born in Clio, Alabama, to Elizabeth (Lizzie) Janet Lewis Webb, a schoolteacher, and Willis James Webb, a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church. In her early years she moved with her parents to Troy, Andalusia, Birmingham, Batesville, and Eufala, Alabama. As an itinerant minister ordained by a Methodist church, Reverend Webb was subject to reassignment to a new church at any annual conference, and every one to two years he had to move. The family supplemented his minister's salary by sharecropping cotton and corn and grew field peas, greens, and vegetables for their own use or for sale.

The family ...