1-17 of 17 results  for:

  • College/University President x
  • 1972–present: The Contemporary World x
Clear all

Article

Wayne J. Urban

college professor and administrator, was born in Nashville, Tennessee, the son of James Bond, a Congregationalist minister, and Jane Alice Browne, a graduate of Oberlin College and a schoolteacher. Horace Bond's paternal grandmother, Jane Arthur Bond, was a slave who raised two sons by herself. These two sons, Bond's father and his uncle, Henry, both earned college degrees and embarked on professional careers. Three of Bond's four siblings earned college degrees, and his cousins on his father's side also distinguished themselves academically. This family achievement was important to Horace Bond, because it exemplified the way in which numerous scholars of his generation were nurtured within the African American community. He published a book on the family origins of African American scholars near the end of his life, Black American Scholars: A Study of Their Beginnings (1972).

Bond was an intellectually precocious child He was ...

Article

Frank E. Dobson

educator and scholar. The grandson of slaves, Horace Mann Bond was born in Nashville, Tennessee, to two graduates of Oberlin College, Jane Alice Browne, a schoolteacher, and James Bond, a minister. Named after the abolitionist and educator Horace Mann, Bond was an academic prodigy, graduating from high school at the age of fourteen. He attended Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and was something of a mascot to his older classmates. Labeled the “class baby” by some, Bond proved himself a leader, becoming involved in a number of activities, including the school newspaper, debate, and a social fraternity. Bond graduated from Lincoln with honors in 1923, at the age of eighteen.

Following graduation Bond was offered a teaching post at Lincoln in preparation he took graduate courses at Pennsylvania State College While at Penn State Bond excelled academically but he encountered racism from a white professor who refused ...

Article

Philip Alexander

physicist, educator, and academic administrator, was born in Pocahontas, Virginia, the son of Harry P. Branson, a coal miner, and Gertrude Brown. In 1928, after several years at his local elementary school, Herman enrolled at Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C., one of the nation's preeminent black secondary schools. He was encouraged in this move by a young black physician, William Henry Welch, who practiced in Pocahontas and who rented lodgings from young Branson's grandmother.

At Dunbar, Branson was introduced to studies in Latin, advanced mathematics, and other disciplines to which he would not have been exposed in his local high school. After graduating as valedictorian in 1932 he enrolled at the University of Pittsburgh with a view to studying medicine partly because his great uncle had been trained as a physician there Branson completed the premedical program in two years and still found time ...

Article

Daly Guilamo

was born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, on 25 February 1949. De Filippis’s grandmother, whom she refers to as Mama Beila and whose real name is Gabriela Menendez Henriquez, was a schoolteacher and avid book reader. She inspired her granddaughter to study Dominican poetry, which she began memorizing at the age of 7. Her exploration of Dominican poetry, beginning in her childhood, has been a lifelong endeavor, allowing her to cultivate her identity as a woman and a scholar. Such childhood activities later influenced De Filippis in her choice of discipline and eventual profession. De Filippis was bilingual by the age of 9, fluent in both Italian and Spanish. Her parents divorced when she was 4 years old.

In 1962 De Filippis left her homeland to settle with her parents in New York City, where she eventually graduated from high school. At the city’s Queens College, in 1975 ...

Article

Jennifer Jensen Wallach

educator and college president. Johnnetta Betsch was born in Jacksonville, Florida, into a middle-class family. A precocious learner, she entered Fisk University at the age of fifteen, transferred to Oberlin College the next year, and earned a degree in anthropology in 1957. Continuing her study of anthropology, she then attended Northwestern University, earning an MA in 1959 and a PhD in 1967. In 1960 Betsch married Robert Cole, a white economist whom she met at Northwestern; they had three sons and divorced in 1982. In 1988 she married Arthur J. Robinson Jr.

Cole held teaching positions at Washington State University, at the University of California at Los Angeles, and at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where she remained for thirteen years, 1970 to 1983, both as a professor and later as an associate provost She also taught at Hunter College of the City University ...

Article

Beverly Guy-Sheftall

Johnnetta Betsch Cole was the seventh president of Spelman College (1987-1997), the oldest college for black women in the United States. Under her leadership, Spelman became the first historically black college or university to receive top ratings by U.S. News & World Report and Money magazine. During her presidency she raised over $113 million in the Capital Campaign Fund, which was the largest sum ever raised by a historically black college or university. After leaving the Spelman presidency in 1997, she joined the faculty at Emory University, where she was professor of anthropology, women’s studies, and African American studies for four years. She also has the distinction of being the only black woman to have been president of the only two historically black colleges for women. In July 2002 she was appointed president of Bennett College for Women in Greensboro, North Carolina, becoming its fourteenth president.

Cole ...

Article

Robert Fay

Shirley Jackson grew up in Washington, D.C., where her parents, Beatrice and George Jackson, encouraged her interest in science by helping her to prepare school science projects. After graduating first in her class at Roosevelt High School, Jackson was one of only thirty women to enter the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1964. She earned a B.S. degree in 1968 and a Ph.D. in 1973 from MIT, making her the first African American woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics and the first black woman to earn a doctorate in any subject from MIT.

After graduating from MIT, Jackson joined the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, as a research associate (1973–1974, 1975–1976), and was a visiting scientist at the European Center for Nuclear Research in Geneva, Switzerland (1974–1975). From 1976 to 1991 Jackson researched theoretical physics ...

Article

Sowande' Mustakeem

At the young age of twenty-six, Shirley Ann Jackson became not only the first African American woman to receive a PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), but also one of the first two women to receive a degree in theoretical physics from any university in the United States. In 1995, Jackson became both the first African American and first woman appointed to head the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which oversees nuclear power plants in the United States. Additionally, in 1999, Jackson became the first African American president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in New York, the oldest university in the United States dedicated to research in science and engineering.

The second daughter of George and Beatrice Jackson, Jackson was born in Washington, DC She benefited greatly from the strong foundation her parents provided Her mother Beatrice a social worker regularly read to her often choosing the ...

Article

Daniel Donaghy

American physicist and president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Shirley Ann Jackson was born in Washington, D.C., to Beatrice and George Jackson, who instilled in her, as well as in her sister, Alicia, a strong interest in school, especially the study of science. Her parents encouraged Jackson to think for herself from an early age. As a result, she excelled academically throughout elementary and middle school and at Roosevelt High School, where she participated in accelerated math and science programs and from which she graduated in 1964 as valedictorian. She moved on that fall to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she was one of the few African American students and the only one pursuing a career in theoretical physics. She graduated in 1968 after completing her senior thesis on solid state physics and was accepted into many of the nation s most prestigious graduate programs ...

Article

Charles Rosenberg

the son of William Henry and Emma Kersands Nelson, who were both also born in Kentucky. W. H. Stuart was a physician. The family moved to Paducah, where Stuart grew up and graduated from Lincoln High School.

Nelson entered Howard University, but his studies were interrupted by military service in World War I. He achieved the rank of lieutenant as a combat officer in the 367th Infantry, 92nd Division. Army unit assignments being segregated by race, the division was entirely made up of soldiers of African descent, except a few white officers in the upper echelons. Soldiers in the division earned twenty-one distinguished service crosses. Stuart’s father died in 1918 of acute nephritis, and his widowed mother joined him in Washington, D.C. after he was discharged from the Army.

Nelson graduated from Howard University in 1920 He and his mother age fifty were lodgers in the home of Angus ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

Cameroonian academic and politician, was born on 26 June 1943 in Buea, a town on the southwestern side of Mount Cameroon that was then under British control. Her father was a postal worker who had married four wives. Njeuma’s mother was a teacher who impressed upon her daughter the importance of education. She had ten brothers and sisters. Since there were no secondary schools for girls in her home region, Njeuma moved to Nigeria to study. She graduated from the Queen’s School in Enugu, Nigeria. Fortunately for Njeuma, she won a scholarship to study at Pembroke College in the United States in 1962, which later merged with Brown University. She excelled at tennis, and became the captain of the Pembroke tennis team in 1965 After Njeuma graduated she continued to follow her tennis career and played on the Cameroonian national women s tennis team in the 1970s However ...

Article

Ebenezer Ayesu

chief (traditional ruler), economist, business leader, university administrator, and philanthropist, was born Emmanuel Noi Omaboe on 29 October 1930 in Amanokrom, Akuapem in the eastern region of Ghana. His parents were Madam Mary Opibea Awuku of the royal Asona family of Amanokrom and Mr. Peter Nortey Omaboe, a prominent goldsmith resident at Mamfe and a citizen of Osu. He was enrolled in Mamfe Presbyterian Junior School from 1936 to 1942, completed his primary education at the Suhum Presbyterian Senior School in 1945, and from 1946 to 1950 studied at Accra Academy. There, he was a peer of several students who would be future leaders of Ghana, including Peter Ala Adjetey, who went on to a career as a noted lawyer and speaker of Ghana’s parliament (2000–2004). In 1951 he entered the University College of the Gold Coast now the University of Ghana to study economics ...

Article

Ida E. Jones

Player was the first in a number of areas concerning black women in the field of education. She was the first black woman to run a four-year, fully accredited liberal arts college in the United States; the first woman president of the National Association of Schools and Colleges of the Methodist Church, and the first black woman to serve as trustee of Ohio Wesleyan University.

Player was born in Jackson, Mississippi. Her parents, Beatrice Day and Clarence Cromwell Player, moved the family to Akron, Ohio, in 1917. There Willa attended public schools and eventually Akron University and then Ohio Wesleyan. While at Akron University she served as the first black cadet/practice teacher in the public schools of Akron, Ohio, in 1929. In that same year she graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Wesleyan. In 1930 she completed a master of arts degree at Oberlin ...

Article

Jennifer Jensen Wallach

educator and university president. Born Ruth Jean Stubblefield in rural Texas, Simmons was one of twelve children of the sharecroppers Isaac Stubblefield and Fannie Stubblefield. When Ruth was seven her family moved to Houston, where her father worked in a factory and her mother worked as a domestic in white people's homes. Simmons attended segregated public schools in Houston. After her mother died when Ruth was fifteen, a series of remarkable African American teachers mentored her and helped fill some of the void left by her mother's death. Her drama teacher, Vernell Lillie, encouraged her to apply for a scholarship at the historically black Dillard University in New Orleans. Simmons received the scholarship, enrolled, and graduated summa cum laude with a degree in French in 1967.

While in college Simmons was an exchange student at Wellesley College an elite women s college in the Boston suburbs ...

Article

Eric D. Duke

Ruth Simmons is recognized nationally as one of the premier leaders of higher education in the United States. From a sharecropping farm in east Texas and the tough streets of Houston, Simmons rose to attain the presidency of two of the most prestigious centers of higher education in the United States, Smith College and Brown University. Her career has exemplified the ever-important role of African American women in the field of education and marked several important “firsts” in African American history.

Ruth Simmons was born Ruth Jean Stubblefield in Grapeland, Texas, the youngest of twelve children born to Isaac and Fannie Stubblefield After spending her early life in east Texas where her parents worked as sharecroppers on a cotton farm she moved with her family to Houston s notorious Fifth Ward when Simmons was seven years old Here her father labored as a factory worker and eventually a ...

Article

Andre D. Vann

university chancellor, track coach, and first African American Olympic head coach and president of the United States Olympic Committee, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the youngest of thirteen children of Willie and Mary Ann Thomas Walker. He was nine when his father died and was sent to Harlem, New York to live with his older brother Joe, who owned several businesses. He later dropped out of school before entering the twelfth grade to serve as a personal valet to bandleader Jimmie Lunceford of the Jimmie Lunceford Band.

He was later persuaded to return to school to complete his last year. He returned to Atlanta and graduated from the segregated Booker T. Washington High School in 1936. A multi-sport athlete in high school and college, Walker received a scholarship and later entered Benedict College in South Carolina, in the fall of 1936 where he was an ...

Article

David Rego

psychologist, educator, government official, and university president, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the eldest son of William and Margaret Evelyn (Ferguson) Wright. Howard Emery Wright was among the first African Americans to receive a doctorate in psychology. His research interests were social psychology and attitudinal testing.

Wright attended elementary school in Washington, DC, where his father worked as a hotel waiter and his mother as a cook in a private home. In Washington Wright and his parents lived with his maternal grandparents Robert Ferguson, an insurance salesman, and Eleanor Ferguson, a laundry worker. Following the birth of Wright's sister Lydia, the family moved to Atlantic City, New Jersey, where his father worked as a railroad watchman. The Wrights purchased a home in Atlantic City, supplementing their income by taking in boarders.

Following graduation from Atlantic City High School, Wright enrolled at Pennsylvania's Lincoln University in 1929 ...