1-2 of 2 results  for:

  • Washerwoman/Laundress x
  • Society and Social Change x
Clear all

Article

Theresa Vara-Dannen

seamstress, washerwoman, and founder of a New Haven home for the indigent, first appears in public records as a resident of New Haven, Connecticut in a City Directory in 1848. Nothing is known for certain about her birthplace or her parentage. In 1848 she was listed simply as “Miss Hannah Gray, col’d,” of 5 Winter Street.” In 1850, she was boarding with two white women, but on the census form, her place of birth seems to be deliberately illegible.

Although little is known about her origins, it is clear that she saved money and generously supported Connecticut's Underground Railroad and “poor strangers from slavery” (Black Women of Connecticut, p. 31) seeking freedom. The Yale University Divinity School community patronized her laundry and sewing business. Over time she saved enough to purchase a modest four-room home at 158 Dixwell Avenue in New Haven. In the 1860 ...

Article

Delaina A. Price

washerwoman and philanthropist, was born in Shubuta, Mississippi, the only child of Lucy McCarty, a homemaker. Little is known about Oseola's father, as her mother was a victim of sexual assault. When McCarty was a baby, her mother married Willy Zinnerman, a laborer in the turpentine industry. Julia Smith McCarty, Oseola's maternal grandmother, decided to raise her because Oseola's mother would be migrating with her husband to one turpentine camp after the other. These camps were temporary quarters where workers extracted pine tree oils for solvents and were known for crime and gambling. Back in Shubuta, Oseola McCarty lived on her grandmother's farm and learned the virtues of industry and frugality. By 1918 McCarty s grandmother had grown weary of cultivating crops and livestock and moved the family to Hattiesburg Mississippi Once in town her family started a laundry business McCarty attended Eureka Elementary School ...