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Mark Steven Maulucci

singer and guitarist known as “Kokomo,” was born in Lovejoy Station, Georgia, a small railroad town in Clayton County, approximately twenty‐five miles south of Atlanta. He was raised on a farm and learned some guitar from a relative named John Wigges, who was an accomplished knife‐style guitarist. In 1919 Arnold moved to Buffalo, New York, where he worked in a steel mill. After stops and similar jobs in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Gary, Indiana, Arnold moved to the Mississippi Delta in the late 1920s. He reportedly made a living as a bootlegger and throughout his life regarded his music as a sideline. He lived for a while in Glen Allan, Mississippi, and played with a partner named Willie Morris.

In 1930 Arnold made his recording debut as Gitfiddle Jim in a Memphis recording session for Victor The two songs Rainy Night Blues and Paddlin Madeline Blues displayed the ...

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Jacob Ganoe

janitor, Connecticut National Guard lieutenant, and founder of the first African American Boy Scout troop in Connecticut, was born in Nova Scotia, Canada. Little is known about his parents except that he was the second of four children. He had one older and younger sister, Alice and Martha, respectively, and one younger brother, Stephen. In the year 1887, at the age of ten, he, his mother, and his three siblings emigrated to America on the steamer Linda, arriving at Boston Harbor. His mother's name is listed as S. Saunders on the ship's manifest, so her real name is unknown. There is no record of his father. Saunders moved to New Haven, Connecticut, in 1892.

Saunders met his wife, Linna, who was born in January 1865, in Pennsylvania; the two married in 1890 They then settled down at 28 Hazel Street in New Haven Their ...