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Leyla Keough

Benedetto, or as he became known, Saint Benedict the Moor, was born in San Fratello, on the Italian island of Sicily, to Christopher and Diane Manasseri. His parents had been transported as slaves from Africa to Sicily, where they converted to Christianity. Benedetto worked on a farm until he gained his freedom as a teen.

Benedetto continued to work as a laborer. Sharing his wages with the poor and healing the sick, he became known as “the black saint.” He joined a group of hermits who chose Benedetto as their leader. In 1562 he became a lay brother. Stories began to circulate about his saintliness and miraculous deeds; he is said to have resurrected a young boy. Church accounts report that people of all classes in Sicily sought his prayers and his counsel. In 1578 though he was neither a priest nor literate he was chosen to lead a ...

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María de Lourdes Ghidoli

a celebrated chef in Buenos Aires during the early decades of the twentieth century, was born in the province of Corrientes in 1875. The details surrounding his family are unknown, except that his great-grandson Horacio Gonzaga also dedicated himself to cooking. Antonio Gonzaga wrote various cookbooks in which he revived rural cooking traditions and as a result became a well-known author.

Records suggest that Gonzaga’s career as a chef began during his naval service in the last decade of the nineteenth century. On the front jacket of his books, Gonzaga offered one small paragraph that outlined his career as a chef. According to it, his endeavors in the field of gastronomy commenced in 1891. Later, he worked as the head of the kitchen on the maiden voyage of the training ship Fragata Sarmiento between January 1899 and September 1900. In 1901 he was part of the ...

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Luis Gómez-Acuña

was born in Lima, Peru, on 10 March 1934. Her mother, an immigrant from a southern coastal town called San Luis de Cañete who worked in Lima as a chef, taught Teresa how to cook. However, her mother did not want Teresa to spend her life in a kitchen; instead, she pushed her to obtain a professional degree. Teresa decided to become a midwife but quit after only a few classes.

Teresa Izquierdo dedicated the rest of her life to cooking. During the 1960s, she began to sell food in Lima during cockfight and bullfighting sessions, when attendees would consume what is known as comida criolla, a mix of pre-Columbian and Hispanic ingredients. Some of the criollo dishes that Izquierdo offered had been created in colonial times, such as anticucho, composed of small pieces of grilled skewered meat (beef heart) that is served with boiled potatoes.

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Robert Maxon

Kenyan herbalist, cook, farmer, and the paternal grandfather of US President Barack Obama, was born in Kanyadhiang near Kendu Bay on Lake Victoria in what is now Rachuonyo District in Kenya’s Nyanza Province. Onyango’s grandfather, Opiyo, had moved to the Kendu Bay region from Alego, north of the Nyanza Gulf, earlier in the nineteenth century in search of more and better land than was available to the family in Alego.

From an early age Onyango was characterized by a seriousness of purpose and a wanderlust His wandering off on his own and desire to learn led to study with specialists to become an herbalist Onyango s curiosity and thirst for knowledge also led him to leave his home for the port town of Kisumu Colonial rule was not established in the Kendu Bay area until some five years after the transfer of Nyanza Province from Uganda to the East Africa ...