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Camille Hazeur

mathematician, computer programmer, and consultant, was born Laura Cheatham on the west side of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the youngest of three daughters of Gertrude Richey and James Hammond Cheatham. Gertrude was born in Williamston, South Carolina, in 1888 to Mary Roberts and Mak Richey, who sent her to the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary (now Spelman College) in Atlanta, Georgia, from grade school through normal school. After receiving her teaching certificate, Gertrude took a job in Anderson, South Carolina, where she married James Hammond Cheatham, son of a wealthy white plantation owner, James Hammond Freeman, and a Cherokee woman named Emma Lenier. Previously married to a man of mixed race named Cheatham, Lenier had a long-established liaison with James Hammond Freeman, with whom she had five children. James Hammond Cheatham unable to take his biological father s name because of concubinage laws was apparently taught ...

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Shennette Garrett-Scott

world-record-holding typist and business school owner, was born in Maryland and grew up in Washington, D.C. His father and mother's names and occupations are not known. Peters's father, a watchmaker, gave his eleven-year-old son a used typewriter. J. C. Wright, a teacher in the business department of Washington's Dunbar High School, recognized Peters's abilities and coached him to develop his exceptional typing speed and accuracy. Peters graduated from Dunbar High School in 1923. He first worked as a typist for a congressional committee. In 1926 Underwood Typewriter Company hired him as an “expert typing demonstrator.”

Peters won his first major typing title in April 1925 the Underwood Diamond Emblem from the Washington office of the Underwood Typewriter Company He typed an average of 109 five stroke words per minute for more than thirty minutes using one of Underwood s manual typewriters A few months later Peters shattered ...