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Mark G. Emerson

As the second son and namesake of his father, Frederick Douglass Jr. was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts. He attended public schools in Rochester, New York, where he also helped his brothers, Lewis and Charles, to aid runaway slaves who were escaping to Canada on the Underground Railroad. While he did not serve in the Civil War as his brothers did, Frederick acted as a recruiting agent for the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Massachusetts Infantry regiments, as did his father. Following the war, Frederick attempted to enter the typographical workers' union. When that plan failed, he went with his brother Lewis in 1866 to Colorado, where Henry O. Wagoner, a longtime family friend, taught him the trade of typography. While he was in Colorado, Frederick worked with his brother Lewis in the printing office of the Red, White, and Blue Mining Company. In the fall of 1868 Frederick returned ...

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Luther Brown

journalist and editor, was born in Okolona, Mississippi, to James Lee Raspberry, a school shop teacher, and Willie Mae Tucker an English teacher and amateur poet Both parents were intensely interested in education and in seeing to it that their children were the beneficiaries of good educations They prodded their six youngsters to achieve instilling in them a passion for reading a positive approach to life and a desire for logical thinking From his mother Raspberry said that he learned to care about the rhythm and grace of words and from his father he recalled learning that neither tables nor arguments are worthwhile unless they stand solidly on four legs Raspberry went north first moving to live with an older sister in Indianapolis In a few years the rest of the family left the South to become residents of Indianapolis where Raspberry and the rest of his ...

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Charles Rosenberg

newspaper heiress, editor, and socialite, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the oldest child of publisher Christopher J. Perry and Cora Perry. Her father was born of free parents in Baltimore in 1854 and went to Philadelphia at an early age to get an education denied to children of his color in his native city. In 1884 he established the Philadelphia Tribune, which in time became the oldest continually published newspaper written and edited by, and for, Americans of African descent.

Bertha Perry grew up in the Lombard Street Presbyterian Church, where her parents were members. At the age of twenty-nine she continued to live with her parents and two of her three younger sisters, Beatrice Perry and Ethel Jackson, who all worked as clerks at the newspaper. When their father died in May 1921 Bertha Perry became managing editor and women s editor her sister Beatrice ...