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Laurie Jacklin

was born in Preston, St. Mary Parish, Jamaica, on 13 February 1941, to Ivan Haye and Gladys Hyatt. Pamela remained in Jamaica with her grandmother during the 1950s when her parents followed the path of many British-Caribbean subjects and migrated to England hoping to improve their lives. In London, Gladys worked in the printing industry and Ivan was employed at the Cabinet Office Briefing Room (Ministry of Defence). After completing school at West Indies College, Pamela joined her parents in 1958 and studied biochemistry in London.

A vacation in 1966 altered the course of Appelt s life as she decided to remain in Montreal Quebec just shortly after the Canadian government ended its White Canada immigration policy which had traditionally excluded most Caribbean born people She accepted a position in medical biochemistry research at McGill University in Montreal and completed a master s degree in public policy at ...

Article

Benjamin Hebblethwaite

was born on 25 August 1939 in Haiti. Over the course of his career, Beauvoir contributed to the sciences, established a prominent Vodou temple and cultural organization, and published cornerstone volumes of Vodou sacred literature. His publishing solidified his status as the most influential Vodou priest of his generation. Son of one of the first black graduates from Temple University Medical School in Philadelphia, Beauvoir graduated from City University of New York with a degree in chemistry in 1958 and earned a degree in biochemistry in 1962 from the Sorbonne in Paris. As a chemist he worked at Cornell Medical Center in New York City on the synthesis of metabolic steroids; later he worked on the synthesis of hydrocortisone from plants.

In 1973, Beauvoir’s nonagenarian grandfather, an oungan (Vodou priest), designated him as the head of the family religion prior to his death. In 1974 Beauvoir and his ...

Article

Margaret E. M. Tolbert

organic chemist and educator, was born in the Bronx, New York, the only child of Ada May Fox, a homemaker, and Freddie Brown, a maintenance worker who later became a postal worker. Brown's education was obtained in various schools of New York, and she received her high school diploma from New Dorp High School, Staten Island, NewYork; in 1952. Upon completing high school, she continued her educational pursuits by enrolling at Hunter College of the City University of New York, which was free to eligible high school graduates. In 1956 she graduated with a BA in Chemistry and two years later earned her MS at the University of Minnesota, where she was the first African American woman to receive any degree in chemistry. In her two years at the university, she conducted research titled “A Study of Dye and Ylide Formation in Salts of 9-(p ...

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Jeannette Elizabeth Brown

biochemist, was born in Corona, Queens, New York, one of three children of Ivan C. Daly and Helen Page. Her father immigrated from the West Indies and received a scholarship from Cornell University to study chemistry; however, he had to drop out because he could not pay his room and board. Forced to abandon his dream, he became a postal worker. Daly's interest in science came from her father's encouragement and the desire to live his dream. Her maternal grandfather had an extensive library, and her mother spent many hours reading to the children. Daly found books about science and scientists, like Paul D. Kruif's Microbe Hunters, most interesting. She graduated from Hunter College High School, a competitive, all-girls public school in Manhattan. Her science teachers encouraged her to study chemistry at the college level.

After graduating Daly attended Queens College in Flushing New York and graduated ...

Article

Mohamed Kamara

full-time writer and biochemist by training, was born in Porédaka, in the Mamou region of central Guinea on 1 July 1947. He is from the nomadic and cattle-loving Fulbe people. Monénembo’s parents divorced when he was only five. His father was an “African doctor” in Bobo-Dioulasso, in the then French Upper Volta, today Burkina Faso. His mother moved to Sierra Leone to live with her new husband. Tierno Monénembo was thus left to be raised by his grandmother, among uncles and other relatives.

Born Thierno Saïdou Diallo, he received his pen name probably by combining the Fulbe word for grandmother, nenembo, with that for grandson, moné. After his primary school education, Monénembo left his village for middle school in N’Zérékoré and Kankan. From there, he went to Kindia and Conakry to attend high school. In 1969 he earned his baccalaureate with a concentration in biology The ...

Article

Edwin Corena Puentes

was born in Quibdó, in the department of Chocó, Colombia. In the mid-twentieth century, many rural Colombians decided to migrate from their hometowns, some to flee political violence, but others, including Américo Perea, went in search of better academic and work opportunities. At age 15, he moved to the city of Tunja, in central Colombia, where he would earn his degree in biological sciences at the Normal School. From there he would go to other Colombian cities, including Cartagena and Sincelejo, where he worked as a high school teacher, before moving to the capital, Bogotá, where he enrolled in the Universidad Nacional to study biology and chemistry.

By the early 1960s, he was a professor of chemistry at the Universidad Libre de Bogotá, and in 1964 was invited by German academics to further his studies at the master’s level. When he returned from Germany in 1966 he continued offering ...

Article

Kenneth R. Manning

biochemist, educator, and physician, was born in Fort Scott, Kansas, and grew up in Kansas City, Missouri. His parents' names and occupations are unknown. After attending Sumner High School in Kansas City from 1913 to 1917, he entered the University of Kansas, where he majored in chemistry and graduated with an AB in 1921. He stayed an additional year at Kansas before attending the medical school of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, where he earned an MD in 1925 During his medical studies he listed his place of residence as Council Bluffs Iowa Next came a year of internship at Kansas City General Hospital No 2 followed by a one year appointment as house surgeon at Wheatley Provident Hospital also in Kansas City These hospitals located in a racially segregated city served the African American community exclusively and provided one of the few means ...

Article

Kenneth R. Manning

Wilkerson, Vernon Alexander (21 August 1901–24 May 1968), biochemist, educator, and physician was born in Fort Scott Kansas and grew up in Kansas City Missouri His parents names and occupations are unknown After attending Sumner High School in Kansas City 1913 1917 he entered the University of Kansas where he majored in chemistry and graduated with an A B in 1921 He stayed an additional year at Kansas before attending the medical school of the University of Iowa Iowa City where he earned the M D in 1925 During his medical studies he listed his place of residence as Council Bluffs Iowa Next came a year of internship at Kansas City General Hospital No 2 followed by a one year appointment as house surgeon at Wheatley Provident Hospital also in Kansas City These hospitals located in a racially segregated city served the African American community exclusively and ...