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Article

Vincent F. A. Golphin

clergyman, and the first African American Roman Catholic archbishop in the United States, was born in Biloxi, Mississippi, the sixth of eight children of Jesus Maria Marino, a baker, and Lottie Irene Bradford a maid After an elementary and high school education in parish schools the future prelate studied for the priesthood as a member of a religious community established to minister to blacks and Native Americans He graduated from St Joseph s Seminary College in Washington D C and later earned a master s degree at Fordham University Marino grew up as a religious minority within a racial minority oppressed by segregation in the Deep South The family was devoutly Catholic in a region of the country that was overwhelmingly Protestant and historically as hostile toward the Church of Rome as it was toward people of African descent Biloxi s Catholic parish for blacks Our Mother ...

Article

Andrew Sylvester

supercentenarian, was born Emmaline Fanchon May Faust in Sedalia, Guilford County, North Carolina. For a brief period before her death she was the oldest living person in the world. She was the youngest of twenty-three children born to former slaves Alphonso and Martha Faust. Her father worked as a laborer on a farm. In order to escape segregation and dwindling economic and political rights in the Jim Crow South, the Faust family moved to a farm on Hebron Avenue in Glastonbury, Connecticut, in 1900 When she was nine years old Emma s mother taught her how to cook Soon after learning how to cook Emma began working for the Williams family She would go to cook them breakfast before school and then walk the Williams children to school At the age of thirteen Emma was christened at the First Church of Christ Congregational on Main Street ...