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Jessica M. Parr

Samuel Gridley Howe was born to a prominent Boston family. His father, Joseph Neals Howe, owned a rope-manufacturing company in this thriving port city. His mother, Patty Gridley, was renowned for her beauty. Howe entered the Boston Latin School at the age of eleven, graduating in 1818. At the age of seventeen he entered Brown University, the only one of the three Howe sons to attend college, owing to a decline in the family's financial situation.

Following Howe's graduation from Brown in 1821, he matriculated at the Harvard Medical School. After he completed his medical studies in 1824, his restless nature and democratic sensibilities led him to join the Greek army as a surgeon and soldier during the Greek war of independence. Howe returned to Boston in 1831, where he met a friend from his undergraduate days named John Dix Fisher. In 1829 Fisher ...

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Denton L. Watson

civil rights lobbyist, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, the son of Clarence Maurice Mitchell, a waiter, and Elsie Davis. He attended St. Katherine's Episcopal Church and later became a member of the Sharp Street Memorial Methodist Church. From Douglass High School in Baltimore, he entered Lincoln University in Pennsylvania in 1928 and graduated in 1932 with a BA. In 1938 Mitchell married Juanita Elizabeth Jackson, daughter of Keiffer Bowen Jackson and Lillie Mae Jackson of Baltimore; they had four children. President of the Baltimore branch of the due NAACP and the Maryland State Conference of NAACP Branches, Lillie Jackson spearheaded the freedom movement in the state and became a celebrated historical figure.From 1933 to 1936 Mitchell was a reporter for the Baltimore Afro American He left for a year of graduate study at the Atlanta School of Social Work as a National Urban League ...