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Adam Jones

traveler and writer from what is now southern Ghana, was born c. 1827 in or near the Asante capital of Kumasi. In contemporary documents, his name often appears as Aquassie Boachi. His father Kwaku Dua (c.1797–1867) was Asantehene (King of Asante) from 1834 to 1867. According to the “History of Ashanti,” prepared in the mid-twentieth century under the chairmanship of Asantehene Prempeh II (1892–1970), Kwasi Boakye belonged to the village of Atomfuo, 8 miles (13 km) east of Kumasi. This suggests that on his mother’s side he came from the lineage of royal blacksmiths, which may explain why, in 1837 in accordance with his father s wishes he and a close relative of the same age Kwame Poku were chosen to accompany a Dutch embassy under Major General Jan Verveer on its return to Elmina on the coast They were subsequently brought to ...

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Charles Rosenberg

Baltimore area leader of the Congress On Racial Equality (CORE), and founder of Activists for Fair Housing, was born in Monroe, North Carolina, the son of Walter L. and Carrie P. Carter. Census records suggest he had at least four older sisters and an older brother, as well as a younger sister.

Carter entered North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College (NCAT) in 1941, but his studies were interrupted for military service in World War II. He enlisted as a private at Greensboro on 15 December 1942, was assigned to the Signal Corps (Natl. Archives WW II Army Enlistment Records, Record Group 64), and won five battle stars (MD House Joint Resolution 29, 26 Apr. 1972). Discharged in June 1946, Carter resumed studies at NCAT where he worked on voter registration campaigns participated in the campus debate team and joined the Progressive Party Many Americans ...

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Alexander J. Chenault

the first black popularly elected governor of the United States Virgin Islands, Delegate to the United States House of Representatives, and ambassador, was born in Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, to Charles and Maude (Rogiers) Evans. He attended the Christiansted Public Grammar and Junior High schools and completed his secondary education at the Charlotte Amalie High School in St. Thomas, where he graduated as valedictorian of his class.

At the age of nineteen, Evans moved to Washington, D.C., and studied at Howard University, where he graduated magna cum laude in 1940. In 1944 he received his medical degree with honors from the Howard University Medical School. Evans married Mary Phyllis Anderson, a nurse he met while completing his medical internship at Harlem Hospital in New York City in 1945, and they had four sons together: Melvin Herbert Jr., Robert Rogiers, William Charles and ...

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David Killingray

Black BritishWesleyan missionary and traveller in West Africa. Freeman was born in Hampshire, the child of a black father and a white mother. Little is known of his early years, but he was employed as a gardener in Suffolk and became a Christian, joining the Wesleyan Methodists. In 1838 Freeman went as a missionary to the Gold Coast, an area of West Africa where he was to spend most of his life. He built Methodist churches at Cape Coast and Accra, promoted education, and trained local men for the ministry. He established a mission station in Kumase, the Asante capital, and visited towns in southern Nigeria and also the kingdom of Dahomey, where he urged King Gezo to stop the slave trade. On furlough in Britain in 1843 Freeman actively promoted missionary work and also the anti‐slavery cause, both helped by publication of his travel accounts. In 1847 ...

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John Gilmore

Englishwriter on historical subjects. Froude was widely admired for his literary skill, but frequently criticized for his inaccuracies, which did not stop him eventually being appointed Regius Professor of Modern History at Oxford in 1892 He was a staunch advocate of British imperialism which he saw as the ...

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Richard A. Bradshaw and Juan Fandos-Rius

Central African Republic (CAR) diplomat, was named Galingui at his birth on 4 June 1920 at Limassa, a town next to the Ubangi River in what is now Mbomou prefecture in southeastern CAR. His parents were members of the Yakoma ethnic group, one of several communities on both sides of the Ubangi River who speak dialects of the Ngbandi language, which belongs to the Adamawa-Ubangi branch of the Niger-Congo family. As French explorers and colonists moved up the Ubangi River at the turn of the 20th century, they took many Yakoma into their employ and the descendants of these Yakoma auxiliaries often had privileged access to French education and assimilated French culture to a greater degree than most Central Africans. Galingui’s life exemplifies this process.

Galingui attended École urbaine (urban primary school) in Bangui, the capital of Ubangi-Shari, and then École Edouard-Renard in Brazzaville from December 1936 to 1939 ...

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Michael Niblett

Religious title Mahatma Gandhi (1869–1948), political leader and social reformer often regarded as the ‘father’ of modern India and one of the most influential figures of the 20th century. The series of non‐violent civil disobedience campaigns he led against British colonial rule between 1919 and 1942 brought him to worldwide prominence. Although never holding high political office, the aura of spiritual authority he projected is frequently seen as having enabled Gandhi to transform India's nationalist struggle from an elitist political campaign into a mass moral crusade. As a result, he had a considerable impact on Britain too. From 1919 onwards, every British Cabinet had to contend with the Mahatma; his erosion of the moral credibility of colonial power in India was pivotal to Britain's reassessment of its role as an imperial nation.

Gandhi was born in India in the town of Porbandar on the south west coast of ...

Article

Scott Yanow

jazz pianist, was born in Detroit, Michigan. Hanna began playing piano when he was eleven years old. His first music teacher was his father, a preacher at the local church, who also played saxophone. His brother played trumpet and violin. Hanna doubled on the alto saxophone when he was attending Cass Technical High School, although he did not pursue that instrument.

Hanna began working professionally in Detroit clubs in 1948 when he was sixteen years old. After serving in the U.S. Army from 1950 to 1952, he became a significant part of the rich Detroit jazz and piano scene, following in the footsteps of Hank Jones and his contemporaries Barry Harris and Tommy Flanagan.

Moving to New York to study at Juilliard in 1955, Hanna gained attention and displayed his versatility during stints with the Benny Goodman Orchestra in 1958 including performing at the Newport Jazz ...

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James McCarthy

Scottish explorer and geographer of Africa, was born in Edinburgh in 1844. Alexander Keith Johnston was the son of the eminent geographer and cartographer of the same name, who had established the highly respected engraving and mapmaking firm of W. & A. K. Johnston with his brother William. Although the young Keith was educated at prestigious schools in the Scottish capital, he was also tutored carefully by his father, and learned those European languages in which significant geographical material was published. Like his father, Keith’s interest extended well beyond conventional cartography, and he made important contributions to oceanography, hydrology, and global climatic influences. Both were influential figures in the Royal Geographical Society (RGS), itself the most important national institution in the promotion of worldwide discovery and the development of the nineteenth-century British Empire, not least in Africa.

After a period as superintendent of drawing and engraving at the prestigious ...

Article

colonial official and explorer, was born on 17 July 1858 in Chandernagor, a tiny city and former French colonial enclave in southern India. When Liotard's parents, Pierre Liotard and Hélène Liotard (née Durup de Dombal), died while Victor-Théophile was a very young boy, several families of doctors and pharmacists helped to raise Liotard. With their support Liotard eventually studied at a secondary school in Rochefort, France. He enrolled at the Ecole de Médicine Navale in Rochefort in 1882 after a short stay in Guadeloupe in the Caribbean. On 28 July 1883 Liotard graduated from medical school with a degree as a pharmacist. From 1884 to 1885 Liotard served on the Iles du Salut in French Guiana South America where he helped to battle a yellow fever epidemic Reassigned briefly to Cherbourg the French naval headquarters Liotard received orders to serve in the French colonial medical service in the ...

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Mary Krane Derr

journalist, physician, business and civic leader, and Caribbean independence activist, was born to the reformer Charles Edgar Petioni and Alicia Martin Petioni in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, British-occupied West Indies. Charles Augustin Petioni graduated from the Boys' Model School, the Government College for Teachers (1900), and the Royal Victoria Institute (Commercial Business Course, 1902). Between the ages of sixteen and twenty-three he was employed as clerk and manager for Felix Potin and Company, a French distributor of specialty foods such as chocolates. He then distinguished himself as chief reporter and sub-editor of Port-of-Spain's Daily Morning Mirror (1908–1916) and editor of the bilingual (Spanish-English) Daily Evening Argos (1917–1918). He also served as an official government reporter for Trinidad's Supreme Court and Legislative Council.

As a journalist Petioni critiqued British rule He took further anticolonial action as founder and officer of the Metropolitan ...

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Charles Rosenberg

a skilled toolmaker and mechanical engineer who spent nearly half a century working in the Soviet Union, was born in Kingston, Jamaica, to an Octavia Robinson, from Dominica, and a Jamaican father, who moved the family to Cuba when Robinson was six and a half years old, deserting his wife and son soon after. There is some uncertainty as to his precise date of birth. When he entered Ellis Island in May 1923, he was recorded as twenty‐two years old. When he returned to the United States in 1933 to visit his mother, his date of birth was recorded as 22 June 1900. His autobiography implies a birth date of 1907, while other sources provide dates of 1904 and 1906.

In the 1980s Robinson recalled that racism had little impact as he was growing up in Cuba where he learned English at home Spanish and French ...

Article

Adam W. Green

actor, was born in Nebraska and raised in a foster home from the age of nine. He eventually held menial jobs in the countryside, working in the mines and delivering messages, before becoming enamored of the theater. Rudd moved east to earn a spot on the stage, and began performing regularly in Philadelphia in the early 1920s. Though he was initially disgruntled by the lack of opportunities given to him even on stage, Rudd was soon “discovered” by Jasper Deeter, a director and founder of Hedgerow, a white theater in Moylan-Rose Valley, Pennsylvania. Deeter began using Rudd as part of his repertory company, most notably as the eponymous character in a critically acclaimed production of The Emperor Jones. In 1930, the same year Paul Robeson famously played Othello in London, Rudd was said to have performed it at Hedgerow, in America.

Along with the roles supplied ...

Article

Angela Bates

professional football player, businessman, and historic preservationist, was the youngest of six children born to Fred and Ora Switzer of Nicodemus, an all African American town in northwestern Kansas. He grew up playing football on the dusty dirt streets of Nicodemus. He liked fishing and hunting and especially helping with farm chores. He attended grade school at Nicodemus until the eighth grade and then attended nearby Bogue High School. While in high school he played on the football and basketball teams and ran track. He lettered each year in all three sports.

Upon graduation in 1950, Switzer entered Kansas State University as one of the first African Americans to receive a football scholarship to the university. While at Kansas State he lettered three years in both football and track and was named to the All Big Seven three years in a row. In 1952 Switzer ...