1-7 of 7 results  for:

  • 1955–1971: Civil Rights Era x
Clear all

Article

Born in Tuskegee, Alabama, Nathaniel Calloway was a man of many talents. He started his career as a chemist, graduating from Iowa State University (then College) in 1930 and earning his Ph.D. in 1933. After publishing influential research and teaching at both Tuskegee Institute and Fisk University, Calloway decided to enter medical school. In 1940 he enrolled at the University of Chicago, but, denied the opportunity to treat white patients, he transferred to the University of Illinois, from which he received his M.D. in 1943.

After World War II (1939–1945)—during which he conducted research on recuperation theories—Calloway worked at Provident Hospital in Chicago, Illinois, ultimately becoming its director. In 1949 he founded an all-black group practice, and throughout the next fifteen years he combined his medical work with civil rights activism. From 1955 to 1960 Calloway served as president of the Chicago ...

Article

was born in Buenaventura, a Pacific coast city in Colombia’s Valle del Cauca Department. Of African descent, he came from a very poor family, and because he did not have many toys as a young child, he played with small animals. These were his entertainment and also the origin of his interest in nature and what awoke his curiosity in science. Along with his academic interests, Cuero was also an accomplished athlete. He was a professional basketball player while pursuing his studies, becoming one of the best national players in Colombia.

Cuero graduated as a biologist from Universidad del Valle in Colombia In the 1970s he received an academic scholarship to study in the United States specifically at Heidelberg University in Ohio where he obtained his bachelor s degree in biology Later he received his master s degree in plant pathology at Ohio State University Cuero was awarded another scholarship ...

Article

Kahiudi C. Mabana

Congolese writer and chemist, was born on 14 July 1941 to a Congolese father and a central African mother. He was nineteen when Congo-Brazzaville achieved independence, which allowed him to refine his views on history and the surrounding world.

After secondary school in the Congo, Dongala embarked for the United States, where he obtained a BA in chemistry at Oberlin College and an MA at Rutgers University. He completed a doctorate in organic chemistry in France. Returning to his country, he worked as a chemistry professor at the Université Marien Ngouabi in Brazzaville, where he passed a large part of his life. But he spent most of his time on literature and theater. For years he ran the Théâtre de l’Éclair in Brazzaville, until the political troubles that arose in the Congo forced him into exile in 1998 First he went to France where to the surprise of all involved ...

Article

Henry A. Hill was born in St. Joseph, North Carolina. He completed a B.A. at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1936 and a Ph.D. in chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1942. In 1961 he became president and founder of the ...

Article

Wayne Dawkins

soybean chemist and inventor. Percy Lavon Julian was born in Montgomery, Alabama, the son of James S. Julian, a railway mail clerk, and Elizabeth Lena Adams, a teacher. Young Percy spent many summer days in the crop fields with his grandfather, a former slave who lost two fingers because slave captors discovered that he could read.

Percy attended the private Normal School for Negroes in Montgomery. After graduation in 1916 he enrolled at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana. Percy traveled six hundred miles to college because of his father and grandmother: Percy's grandmother had saved for her son's entry, but James Julian, was unable to go. So Percy Julian did go to DePauw, which was in the hometown of the Normal School teacher who recommended that his father receive higher education. Julian graduated in 1920 as valedictorian and a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and ...

Article

Percy Lavon Julian, the grandson of former slaves, was one of six children. His father, James Sumner Julian, a railway clerk, and his mother, Elizabeth Adams Julian, encouraged their children to pursue education, and each of the six achieved an M.A., Ph.D., or M.D. degree. In 1916 Percy Julian graduated at the top of his class from the private State Normal School for Negroes and entered Indiana's DePauw University. Because his prior schooling was inferior, DePauw required Julian to take high school courses alongside his full load of college credits. He also worked to support himself during this time. Nonetheless, he became a member of the Phi Beta Kappa honor society and graduated in 1920 as valedictorian.

Julian hoped to pursue a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry but while white members of his class with poorer academic records received graduate fellowships he received no offers Several universities told ...

Article

Gary L. Frost

Egyptian Nobel Prize–winning chemist, was born on 26 February 1946 in Damanhur, Egypt, the only son of Hassan Ahmed Zewail, a civil servant and businessman, and Rawhia Rabiʿe Dar. He and three younger sisters grew up in Rashid (also known as Rosetta) and were educated in state schools. Zewail earned a master’s degree (1968) at the University of Alexandria and a PhD in chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania (1974). From 1974 until 1976 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. In 1976 he joined the faculty of the California Institute of Technology, serving as Linus Pauling Professor of Chemistry and professor of physics since 1995. He also served as the director of the National Science Foundation Laboratory for Molecular Sciences at Caltech from 1996 to 2007. In 2005 he became director of the Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast ...