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Charles Rosenberg

college president, activist for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA). Born Mary Rice in Harrisonburg, Virginia, she was the acknowledged daughter of confederate general John R. Jones and Malinda Rice, who was hired as a servant in his household at the age of seventeen in 1873. There appears to have been some enduring affection between Jones and Rice. He acknowledged paternity of Mary and her brother William, and his first wife, Sarah, ill and often confined to bed, asked to see the children and gave them presents. Mary Rice was raised in part by John Rice, Malinda's brother, and his wife Dolly. She also spent time in Jones's household, and after Sarah Jones died in 1879 the general bought a house for Malinda and her children The immediate neighborhood was racially mixed ...

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Frank E. Dobson

educator and scholar. The grandson of slaves, Horace Mann Bond was born in Nashville, Tennessee, to two graduates of Oberlin College, Jane Alice Browne, a schoolteacher, and James Bond, a minister. Named after the abolitionist and educator Horace Mann, Bond was an academic prodigy, graduating from high school at the age of fourteen. He attended Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and was something of a mascot to his older classmates. Labeled the “class baby” by some, Bond proved himself a leader, becoming involved in a number of activities, including the school newspaper, debate, and a social fraternity. Bond graduated from Lincoln with honors in 1923, at the age of eighteen.

Following graduation Bond was offered a teaching post at Lincoln in preparation he took graduate courses at Pennsylvania State College While at Penn State Bond excelled academically but he encountered racism from a white professor who refused ...

Article

Charles Rosenberg

president of Allen University, thirty‐seventh bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, was born in Winnsboro, South Carolina, the son of Henry Chappelle and Patsy McCrory Chappelle. Contemporary sources state that he was born enslaved, as were 98 percent of African Americans in South Carolina on the eve of the Civil War. There remains a possibility that he was free, since his recently widowed mother reported in the 1900 census that she was born in November 1827, and had been married fifty‐four years. Chappelle's maternal grandparents were Samuel and Fanny McCrory. Such stability of family name and marriage bonds may mean that his parents, or one of his parents had known freedom.

Chappelle attended the Fairfield Normal Institute at Winnsboro a school funded by northern Presbyterians staffed by northern educators considered white He experienced a Christian conversion at the age of nineteen making a life long ...

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F. Finley McRae

educator, was born Frank Wilbur Hale in Kansas City, Missouri, to Frank W. Hale, Sr. and Novella Banks Hale. Hale graduated from Topeka High School in Kansas in 1945. He earned an undergraduate degree at the University of Nebraska in 1950 and a Ph.D. in communication and political science at Ohio State University in 1955. In 1960 he completed a postdoctoral fellowship in English Literature at the University of London. Hale taught at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Potomac State University in West Virginia, and the Andrews University's School of Graduate Studies in Berrien Springs, Michigan.

The first African American associate dean of the Ohio State University graduate school, Hale was also OSU's second black vice‐provost and professor emeritus. Earlier in his academic career, he had presided over Oakwood College (now university) and chaired Central State University's English Department. In 1957 when only thirty years old ...

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John Hope's mother, Mary Frances, was a freed slave and his father, James Hope, a Scot. He graduated with honors from Worcester Academy in June 1890, and received a scholarship to Brown University, where he graduated, also with honors, in 1894. He married Lugenia Burns, a social worker from Chicago; they became parents of two sons.

Hope was a teacher in Nashville at Roger Williams College, where he taught Greek, Latin, and the natural sciences from 1894 to 1898. His career reflected his belief that African Americans could achieve equality through higher learning. In 1898 Hope moved to Atlanta Baptist College, which in 1913 was renamed Morehouse College, where he was professor of classics.

In 1906 Hope became Morehouse's president. He was the only university president to join W. E. B. Du Bois's militant Niagara Movement in 1906 During his ...

Article

Adriel A. Hilton

educator, was born in Chicago, Illinois, to Adelia Leonard Smith, an elementary school teacher, and Frank David Smith. Wheelan graduated from St. Gerard Catholic High School of San Antonio, Texas, in 1968. In 1968 Wheelan entered Trinity University of San Antonio, Texas, and graduated in 1972 with a double major in psychology and sociology. She became the first African American at Trinity to be included in Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. It was to be the first of many milestones in a career that covered more than three decades. She went on to study at Louisiana State University and received a Master of Arts degree in Developmental/Educational Psychology in 1974. That same year, Wheelan became an associate professor at Alamo Community College District at San Antonio College. Recognizing the importance of advanced education, she left that position in 1984 to enroll in ...