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Charles Rosenberg

college president, activist for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA). Born Mary Rice in Harrisonburg, Virginia, she was the acknowledged daughter of confederate general John R. Jones and Malinda Rice, who was hired as a servant in his household at the age of seventeen in 1873. There appears to have been some enduring affection between Jones and Rice. He acknowledged paternity of Mary and her brother William, and his first wife, Sarah, ill and often confined to bed, asked to see the children and gave them presents. Mary Rice was raised in part by John Rice, Malinda's brother, and his wife Dolly. She also spent time in Jones's household, and after Sarah Jones died in 1879 the general bought a house for Malinda and her children The immediate neighborhood was racially mixed ...

Article

Frank E. Dobson

educator and scholar. The grandson of slaves, Horace Mann Bond was born in Nashville, Tennessee, to two graduates of Oberlin College, Jane Alice Browne, a schoolteacher, and James Bond, a minister. Named after the abolitionist and educator Horace Mann, Bond was an academic prodigy, graduating from high school at the age of fourteen. He attended Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and was something of a mascot to his older classmates. Labeled the “class baby” by some, Bond proved himself a leader, becoming involved in a number of activities, including the school newspaper, debate, and a social fraternity. Bond graduated from Lincoln with honors in 1923, at the age of eighteen.

Following graduation Bond was offered a teaching post at Lincoln in preparation he took graduate courses at Pennsylvania State College While at Penn State Bond excelled academically but he encountered racism from a white professor who refused ...

Article

Rose C. Thevenin

college president, pastor, and educator, was born in Richmond, Virginia, and attended public schools. He received his undergraduate degree in Education from Bluefield State College in West Virginia in 1933. The following year he earned a master's degree in Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania. Gray began his teaching career as professor of chemistry, professor of education, principal of the demonstration schools, and field director of Extension Services at Southern University in Louisiana. In the 1930s he married Hazel Yates in Louisiana. The couple had two children, a daughter Marion and a son William Herbert Gray III.

Upon the death of Nathan White Collier, the president of Florida Normal and Industrial Institute (FNII) in 1941, Gray was appointed president of that institution in 1942 and moved his family to St Augustine Florida There he sought to improve the financial crisis of FNII which ...

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John Hope's mother, Mary Frances, was a freed slave and his father, James Hope, a Scot. He graduated with honors from Worcester Academy in June 1890, and received a scholarship to Brown University, where he graduated, also with honors, in 1894. He married Lugenia Burns, a social worker from Chicago; they became parents of two sons.

Hope was a teacher in Nashville at Roger Williams College, where he taught Greek, Latin, and the natural sciences from 1894 to 1898. His career reflected his belief that African Americans could achieve equality through higher learning. In 1898 Hope moved to Atlanta Baptist College, which in 1913 was renamed Morehouse College, where he was professor of classics.

In 1906 Hope became Morehouse's president. He was the only university president to join W. E. B. Du Bois's militant Niagara Movement in 1906 During his ...

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C. Ellen Connally

educator and civil rights leader. The monumental contributions of the eminent historian John Hope Franklin have caused many students of African American history to confuse the historian with Franklin's namesake, the educator and civil rights leader John Hope. In 1998 Franklin described Hope as the least-known and least-understood major figure in the annals of African American history between Booker T. Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.

A contemporary of both Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois, Hope played a key role in the advancement of higher education for blacks during the early twentieth century. His career reflects the transition from white governance of black institutions of higher education to black governance of such institutions. In 1906 Hope became the first black president of the Atlanta Baptist College (later Morehouse College), and in 1929 he was unanimously selected president of the new Atlanta University Center when Morehouse and ...

Article

Donna Tyler Hollie

educator, was born in Washington, D.C., the youngest of six children of William Ross Patterson and Mamie Brooks Patterson, educators. Like countless other African Americans, the couple had migrated North in search of an improved educational, cultural, social, and racial climate for their children. Patterson's birthplace was within three blocks of the home of Frederick Douglass, for whom he was named. Patterson was only two when his parents died of tuberculosis. In a detailed will, each child was assigned to a relative or family friend. Although the will stipulated that Patterson was to be raised by “Aunt” Julia Dorsey, he was moved several times and ultimately his oldest sister, Wilhemina assumed responsibility for him From her meager earnings as a schoolteacher she financed his tuition and room and board at the elementary school operated by what is now Huston Tillotson College in Austin Texas In ...

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Sholomo B. Levy

minister, educator, and humanitarian, was born in Norfolk, Virginia, the son of Hughes Proctor, who worked at the Norfolk Navy Yard, and Velma Gladys. His parents had met as students at Norfolk Mission College, the same college attended by Velma's parents; Hughes's mother had attended Hampton Institute during Reconstruction. It was unusual for a black family to have such educated parents and grandparents so soon after slavery, and Samuel and his six siblings were raised to believe that educational attainment was natural and expected. Music and religious devotion also helped shape Samuel's childhood. His father played the violin, he played the clarinet, and the other children were each encouraged to learn an instrument. They entertained themselves at home, and they all sang in the choir of the Baptist church founded by his great-grandfather Zechariah Hughes.

As a boy Samuel shined shoes at local barbershops one ...

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SaFiya D. Hoskins

attorney, educator, was born Jesse Nealand Stone Jr. in Gibsland, Louisiana, Bienville Parish, son of Jesse Nealand Stone Sr. and Ola King Stone. His father was an educator in African American schools during the period of segregation in Webster Parish, where the family moved after the birth of their son. As a boy in Louisiana, Stone had witnessed an African American man tied to a tree and whipped nearly to death by a group of white men. He attended Webster High School in Minden, Louisiana, and upon graduating enrolled at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, a historically black university, where he earned his undergraduate degree. Subsequently, he enrolled at the Southern University School of Law, established in 1947, where in 1950 he was among six students in the first ever graduating class from the university s law school Also among notable graduates of the ...

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Travis Boyce

attorney, and college president was born Benner Creswill Turner in Columbus, Georgia, to Dr. Edwin J. Turner and Lila Mae Benner. His father was a respected medical doctor and community leader.

As a child, Turner excelled in the Columbus public school system. Wanting his son to have the best education and a pipeline to Harvard Law School, Dr. Turner sent young Turner to Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, in 1919. During his four years at Phillips Academy, Turner excelled athletically and academically. He was a member of the varsity wrestling team where he was noted for wrestling “remarkably well” (Phillips Academy's Pot Pourri, 1923). Turner was also well known and respected for his academic excellence. One year he was voted “class grind” (the hardest worker) by his classmates. During the spring of 1923 Turner graduated from the Classical Department at Phillips Academy with honors ...

Article

Travis Boyce and Winsome Chunnu-Brayda

professor, architect, and college president, was born Miller Fulton Whittaker in Sumter, South Carolina, to Johnson Chesnut Whittaker and Page Harrison Whittaker on 30 December 1892. His father, a former cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point, was at the center of a violent racial incident in early April 1880 in which he was found unconscious and bound to his bed with slashed earlobes and his hair cut in several places. Having been court-martialed and found guilty of fabricating a story (self-inflicted wounds), Whittaker was expelled from the academy. Two years later, U.S. President Chester A. Arthur overturned his court-martial; nevertheless, the expulsion was upheld. Johnson Whittaker served as a teacher at the Avery Institute in Charleston, South Carolina, and would later be admitted to the South Carolina bar where he practiced law in Sumter in 1885 Johnson Whittaker later served as ...