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Tom W. Dillard

Joseph Carter Corbin was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, on March 26, 1833, of free parents, William and Susan Corbin. By attending several small schools he secured a basic education, and in 1850 he entered Ohio University, of Athens, Ohio. He received his bachelor's degree in 1853 and his master's in 1856. Before receiving his graduate degree, Corbin had accepted employment with a bank in Cincinnati, Ohio. Later, he taught at a school in Louisville, Kentucky. During the Civil War (1861–1865) Corbin edited a Cincinnati newspaper, the Colored Citizen. In 1866 he married Mary Jane Ward. The couple had six children, only two of whom survived their father.

Corbin and his family moved to Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1872, where he worked as a reporter for the Republican Party newspaper, the Daily Republican Like many other African Americans of that day ...

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Azhia Long

educator and politician, as born in Mobile, Alabama. She was the second-youngest of twelve children born to Leroy Kennedy Sr. and Thelma McMillian. Kennedy's paternal grandparents were instrumental in the founding of the Stewart Memorial Christian Methodist Episcopal Church located in Mobile. This church played a large role in Kennedy's life; there she received her early education, was a committed worshipper, and was highly active. Kennedy went on to graduate in the top ten percent of her segregated Central High School class in Mobile in 1962.

That same year, Kennedy enrolled in college at Bishop State Junior College in Mobile, Alabama, where she received an associate's degree in 1964 Soon after Kennedy transferred to Alabama State University in Montgomery Alabama Within her second year at Alabama State she received the President s Award for her academic achievements As a junior Kennedy joined the Beta Eta chapter ...

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Raymond Pierre Hylton

college administrator, entrepreneur, and first and sixth president of Liberia, was born either in Norfolk, Portsmouth, or Petersburg, Virginia, the son of James Roberts and Amelia (maiden name unknown). A persistent rumor that his father was an unidentified white man remains no more than mere speculation. James Roberts and his wife were freed people and had seven surviving children. The family ran a boat and trading business that plied the James River. The Robertses probably lived for a while in Norfolk and later moved to Petersburg, where Joseph alternately worked for his father and in a barbershop owned by the Reverend William Nelson Colson, an African American minister and businessman. The Colson business was located at Wythe and Sycamore streets—an historical marker indicates the actual site.

By 1829 James Roberts had died leaving considerable financial assets and property in Petersburg Joseph as the eldest child ...