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John Hope's mother, Mary Frances, was a freed slave and his father, James Hope, a Scot. He graduated with honors from Worcester Academy in June 1890, and received a scholarship to Brown University, where he graduated, also with honors, in 1894. He married Lugenia Burns, a social worker from Chicago; they became parents of two sons.

Hope was a teacher in Nashville at Roger Williams College, where he taught Greek, Latin, and the natural sciences from 1894 to 1898. His career reflected his belief that African Americans could achieve equality through higher learning. In 1898 Hope moved to Atlanta Baptist College, which in 1913 was renamed Morehouse College, where he was professor of classics.

In 1906 Hope became Morehouse's president. He was the only university president to join W. E. B. Du Bois's militant Niagara Movement in 1906 During his ...

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C. Ellen Connally

educator and civil rights leader. The monumental contributions of the eminent historian John Hope Franklin have caused many students of African American history to confuse the historian with Franklin's namesake, the educator and civil rights leader John Hope. In 1998 Franklin described Hope as the least-known and least-understood major figure in the annals of African American history between Booker T. Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.

A contemporary of both Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois, Hope played a key role in the advancement of higher education for blacks during the early twentieth century. His career reflects the transition from white governance of black institutions of higher education to black governance of such institutions. In 1906 Hope became the first black president of the Atlanta Baptist College (later Morehouse College), and in 1929 he was unanimously selected president of the new Atlanta University Center when Morehouse and ...