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Sam Hitchmough

During a period of political turbulence in Europe, Lajos (Louis) Kossuth became president of the newly formed and ultimately short-lived independent republic of Hungary following the 1848 revolution. When the 1849 intervention of Russian troops in support of Austrian armies against the fledgling republic proved decisive, Kossuth fled to the Ottoman Empire before spending the last forty-five years of his life in exile in England and Italy. He toured the United States in 1851 and 1852 to the great interest of enthusiastic audiences.

Born in Monok, Hungary (then part of Austria), Kossuth was educated in Budapest and trained as a lawyer before entering politics in 1825 As a young member of the Hungarian Diet parliament he acted as the deputy to Count Hunyadi at a time when there was growing sentiment against Austrian rule and a move to reassert Hungarian national identity To avoid censorship of published reports of ...

Article

Alva Moore Stevenson

revolutionary, governor, city councilman, landowner, and businessman, was born Pío de Jesus Píco at the San Gabriel Mission in California, the fourth of the ten children of José María Píco, founder of the Píco family in Southern California, and a native of Fuerte, Sinaloa, Mexico, and María Eustaquia Gutiérrez, from San Miguel de Horcasitas, Sonora, Mexico. Pío's ancestry was a combination of African, Hispanic, Native American, and European. José Píco migrated to California in 1801 with the Anza Expedition, which was authorized in 1775 by the viceroy of Spain. Soldiers and their families were recruited from Sonora to occupy and settle the port of San Francisco. A successful overland emigration and supply route was established between Sonora and Alta California. Among the positions he held were sergeant and corporal Many members of the Píco family served in the military including Pío Píco s ...

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Steven J. Niven

civil rights radical, broadcaster, and writer, was born in Monroe, Union County, North Carolina, the fourth of five children of John Williams, a railroad boiler washer, and Emma (Carter) Williams. In school Robert excelled at history, an interest encouraged by his grandmother, Ellen Williams, who passed on to the young boy tales of slavery and of the violent white supremacy campaigns of the 1890s. Ellen also passed on to Robert the rifle owned by his grandfather, Sikes Williams, who had been a prominent Republican Party activist and newspaper editor.

Even at an early age Robert understood the powerful sexual dynamics that shaped Southern race relations. One incident in particular from Robert's childhood haunted him. As an eleven-year-old he looked on in horror as Monroe's burly police chief, Jesse Helms Sr. the father of the U S senator dragged a black woman to ...