1-3 of 3 Results  for:

  • 1929–1940: The Great Depression and the New Deal x
  • Women's Rights Advocate x
Clear all

Article

Hassoum Ceesay

Gambian politician, women's rights activist, playwright, and nurse, was born in May 1924 in Banjul, Gambia, to Sir John Mahoney, the first Speaker of the Gambian Legislature, and Lady Hannah Mahoney, a typist. She attended St Joseph's Convent and the Methodist Girls’ High School in Banjul, where she sat her Cambridge School Leaving Certificate Examination in 1942.

From 1942 to 1946 she worked as a nurse assistant at the Royal Victoria Hospital (RVH) in Banjul, before traveling to England in 1946 to study medicine at the Royal Infirmary, Bristol, where she obtained her State Registered Nurse (SRN) certificate in 1953. On returning to Gambia, she was posted as a nursing sister to Basse, 400 kilometers from Bathurst, where she met and married Dawda Kairaba Jawara. Their marriage at Basse in February 1955 was described in the Bathurst press as a unique occasion which ...

Article

Ellen Baskin

nurse, organization executive, and reproductive and women's rights activist, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the only child of George and Ozie Wattleton Wattleton s mother was a charismatic preacher who traveled the revival circuit for the fundamentalist Church of God As a result her father worked at an ever changing series of construction and factory jobs and Wattleton often lived with church members during the school year while her parents were on the road Wattleton s childhood experiences of traveling with her parents taught her a great deal about the second class status held by black Americans in the 1940s and 1950s But she also learned important lessons about standing up for herself One example she always remembered was that when her father stopped for gas in the South he would ask the attendant if they had toilet facilities for blacks If the attendant said they ...

Article

Kim Miller

Cameroonian nurse, politician, and writer of fiction, was born in Lomie, Cameroon, in 1935. She attended the Douala secondary school for girls until 1955. Tsogo then moved to Toulouse, France, where she earned a nursing diploma. In 1960 she returned to Cameroon where she worked as a nurse in several different hospitals. She has three daughters.

Her medical work coincided with a notable political career, and Tsogo was one of the first African women to reach some of the top positions in politics. She rose to power in large part because of her work in women’s associations and her unwavering commitment to working on women’s issues. In 1964, Tsogo was elected as the national president of the Council of Cameroonian Women, a position she held until 1985. She became a member of Parliament in 1965 and held that position until 1972 She was the first ...