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Althea T. Davis

nursing leader, was born in New Milford, Connecticut, the daughter of Henry J. Franklin, a laborer and a private in the Twenty-ninth Connecticut Volunteer Division during the Civil War, and Mary E. Gauson. Reared in Meriden, Connecticut, during the post–Civil War period, Franklin lived in a town that had few African Americans. She graduated from Meriden Public High School in 1890. In 1895, having chosen nursing as a career, Franklin entered the Women's Hospital Training School for Nurses in Philadelphia. She graduated in December 1897, the only black graduate in the class, and went on to find work as a private-duty nurse in Meriden and thereafter in New Haven, to which she relocated.

Franklin s interest in organizing the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses NACGN was prompted by the difficulties black women often faced That black women were rarely accepted into schools of ...

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Althea T. Davis

Franklin, Martha Minerva (29 October 1870–26 September 1968), nursing leader, was born in New Milford, Connecticut, the daughter of Henry J. Franklin, a laborer and a private in the Twenty-ninth Connecticut Volunteer Division during the Civil War, and Mary E. Gauson. Reared in Meriden, Connecticut, during the post–Civil War period, Franklin lived in a town that had very few African Americans. She graduated from Meriden Public High School in 1890. In 1895, choosing nursing as a career, Franklin entered the Women’s Hospital Training School for Nurses in Philadelphia. She graduated in December 1897, the only black graduate in the class. After graduation, she worked as a private-duty nurse in Meriden and thereafter in New Haven, to which she relocated.

Franklin s interest in organizing the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses NACGN was prompted by the difficult challenges black women encountered During the Reconstruction era rigid practices ...

Article

Darlene Clark Hine

Born in New Milford, Connecticut, to Henry J. Franklin and Mary E. Gauson Franklin, Martha graduated from Meriden Public High School in 1890. Five years later, she entered the Woman’s Hospital Training School for Nurses in Philadelphia, one of the few black women to have access to such a nursing program. The vast majority of nursing schools either severely restricted or prohibited the admission of black women. This widespread system of racial discrimination and exclusion propelled many African Americans to found a separate network of health care institutions and nurse training schools.

The sole black student in her class, Franklin received her diploma in December 1897. She found employment as a private-duty nurse, because hospital staff or public health nursing were seldom available to black nurses. Franklin worked for a while in Meriden and then in New Haven.

As a graduate nurse Franklin was confronted with ...

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Kaseem Robinson

Her parents’ identities are unknown. Many sources indicate that McCoy was of at least partial Mohawk ethnicity but according to the 1920 and 1940 U.S. Federal Census, she was identified as African American. Reed was married at the age of nineteen to Ireston T. McCoy; her husband was a butcher in a packing house. According to the New York Age newspaper, in 1915 McCoy was an active member of the A.M.E. Zion Church, a leading African American denomination, where she performed songs and recited many poems.

When the Dixwell Community House opened in New Haven, Connecticut in 1924, McCoy was named as its first associate director. In 1928 she became the founder of the first black Girl Scout troop in the United States Troop 24 in New Haven While she was associated with the Dixwell Community Q House Troop 24 was renamed the Laura Belle McCoy Girl Scout ...

Article

Marie Mosley

Estelle Massey Osborne devoted her life to nursing—as a practitioner and as an advocate for improved training and better job opportunities for black nurses. Estelle Massey was born in Palestine, Texas, the eighth of eleven children of Hall and Bettye Estelle Massey, a remarkable couple with strong opinions about child rearing. The Massey children raised and sold vegetables for spending money. The Massey daughters were not allowed to work for white employers because their mother did not want them exposed to racism. The Masseys brought up their children to be strong, confident, and proud.

Estelle Massey attended Prairie View State College After graduation she taught became a nurse and then taught nursing At that point she decided that she needed more education While attending Teachers College at Columbia University in New York Osborne taught at Lincoln Hospital School for Nurses in the Bronx Later she was hired by Harlem ...

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nursing leader, was born Estelle Massey in Palestine, Texas, the daughter of Hall Massey and Bettye Estelle (maiden name unknown). At the time of her birth, many black Americans lived in conditions of poverty and sickness that were comparable to those during slavery. Because black doctors were scarce, black nurses provided the bulk of health care for their communities. Thus for working-class and poor black women, nursing offered an appealing way to embark on a profession, to enter the middle class and gain prestige, and to help others of their race at a time when segregation was common and racism virulent.

As a young woman Osborne considered becoming a dentist like her brother He dissuaded her however arguing that she did not have enough money for dental training and that in any case nursing was a more suitable job for a woman At the time the profession was racially ...

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Stephanie J. Shaw

National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses executive officer, was born Mabel Doyle in Barbados, British West Indies, to Thomas and Pauline Doyle. In 1903 her family settled in Harlem, where her father became a brake inspector for the New York Central Railroad. Staupers attended public schools in New York and graduated from Freedmen's Hospital School of Nursing (now the Howard University College of Nursing) in Washington, D.C., in 1917. After graduation, she began her professional career as a private-duty nurse in New York, but she soon went to work as a nurse administrator in Philadelphia. In 1922 she returned to Harlem and began an illustrious career as a nurse and an administrator.

The Great Migration of African Americans from the rural South resulted in an increase of over 66 percent in Harlem's black population between 1910 and 1920 The attendant social problems of such rapid population ...

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Darlene Clark Hine

The history of black nursing is characterized by a relentless struggle for equality of opportunities and a quest for recognition and acceptance into the mainstream of American nursing. Although others also played major roles in the advance of black nursing, Mabel Keaton Staupers deserves special recognition. Staupers orchestrated the long struggle of black nurses to win full integration into the American nursing profession during the decades of the Great Depression and World War II. Staupers is perhaps best known for her role in implementing the desegregation of the U.S. Army Nurse Corps during World War II. She published an illuminating account of this and other battles of black nurses in No Time for Prejudice: A Story of the Integration of Negroes in Nursing in the United States (1961).

Born in Barbados, West Indies, to Thomas and Pauline Doyle, in April 1903 she and her parents ...