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Joann Buckley and W. Douglas Fisher

Egbert T. Scott came from a large, successful family in Wilmington. His father was a grocer from Virginia. His mother taught at Williston, Wilmington’s leading African American high school. Like several of his older brothers, Scott worked his way through Biddle University (now Johnson C. Smith University) in Charlotte, North Carolina, graduating in 1909 with an arts & sciences degree. After Biddle he moved to the state capital, Raleigh, to study at Shaw University’s Leonard Medical College where he was awarded his M.D. in 1913.

Following graduation Scott moved to Washington, DC, where he interned for a year at Freedmen’s Hospital. After completing his internship in 1914, he moved to Philadelphia to establish a practice. There he worked at Mercy Hospital, which had been established in 1905 and was one of two hospitals for the Philadelphia African American community When the United States entered World War I ...

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Joann Buckley

then part of the Danish Virgin Islands, to William Wilson and Charlotte Petersen. His mother died when he was only five years old. He was the last of eight children and was raised by his older sister Alice, a dressmaker. His early education was at Danish schools in Frederiksted, St. Croix. In 1905 he emigrated to the United States and lived with older siblings in the New York area. He was one of four black graduates of Jersey City High School in 1910. He had the highest grade point average in his class—93.84 percent.

In 1910 Wilson was accepted into a special program that enabled students to complete their A.B. at Columbia College in New York City and medical degrees at Columbia’s College of Physicians and Surgeons in six years. After graduating in 1916 he obtained a one year internship at Freedman s Hospital in Washington DC When ...