1-4 of 4 Results  for:

  • Hospital Administrator x
  • 1877–1928: The Age of Segregation and the Progressive Era x
Clear all

Article

Shari Rudavsky

nursing educator and administrator, was born in Milledgeville, Georgia, the daughter of a poor family about whom nothing is known. In 1901 Andrews applied to Spelman College's MacVicar Hospital School of Nursing. On her application, she asked for financial assistance, explaining that her family could not help her pay. Her mother had a large family to support and “an old flicted husband,” who was not Andrews's father. Andrews also said that she had been married but did not currently live with her husband and expected no support from him. Letters praising Andrews and talking about her “good moral character” that came from the pillars of Milledgeville society proved instrumental in securing Andrews's admission.

In 1906 Andrews received her diploma from Spelman and set upon her life s work During her training she resolved that I wanted to work for my people how or where this was to be done ...

Article

Julia A. Clancy-Smith

Tunisian physician, was born to an old, well-known family of Tunis. Her widowed mother played a pivotal in her education starting from primary school. Both Tawhida and her sister were enrolled in the School for Muslim Girls, an academic institution prized for its first-class education, which had opened in 1909 in the family’s neighborhood. During the 1920s in Tunis while Bin Shaykh attended secondary school the feminist movement took off and was marked by a watershed event in 1924 Manubiya Wartani a young Tunisian woman attending a public conference devoted to the question of feminism and women s rights removed her veil and stood up in the crowd to make a speech At about the same time Bin Shaykh had a chance encounter that would utterly change the course of her life she made the acquaintance of a respected French physician Dr Etienne Burnet and his Russian wife Lydia ...

Article

Elvatrice Parker Belsches

physician, author, hospital administrator, civic and organizational leader, and humanitarian, was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, the elder son of Jesse E. Turner, a chef, and Jennie Edwards Turner. The Turner family migrated during Turner's youth to New York City, where he continued his education in the city's public schools. Turner received his preliminary college education in the College of the City of New York and then enrolled in the Leonard Medical School of Shaw University at age seventeen (Cobb, p. 160). Shaw University, a historically black institution in Raleigh, North Carolina, was founded in 1865 by Reverend Henry Tupper under the auspices of the American Baptist Home Mission Society in an effort to educate the freedmen after the Civil War Reverend Tupper was acutely aware that in addition to educating the head heart and hands it was critical to train practitioners ...

Article

Joann Buckley and W. Douglas Fisher

physician, military officer, hospital founder and administrator, and community leader, was born in Wilson, North Carolina to Napoleon Ward, a freeborn man of color and Mittie Roena, originally a slave to David G. W. Ward.

In 1885 Ward was thirteen and illiterate when he left home for Indianapolis. He found work there cleaning stables. He was fortunate to meet Dr. George Hasty, founder of the Physiomedical College of Indiana. Hasty hired him as his driver and servant. According to David Bodenhamer's Encyclopedia of Indianapolis, Hasty actually moved him into his house where he learned to read and write. Ward went on to graduate from Hasty's Physiomedical College of Indiana in 1897 and opened his own medical practice.

By the mid-1890s the Indianapolis Freeman the city s leading African American newspaper described Ward as a very promising young physician of this city a man of ...