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André Willis

Benny Andrews creates his art using a wide variety of materials, such as photocopies and stencils. His major contributions include Janitors at Rest (1957), constructed with paper towels and toilet paper; Autobiographical Series (1966), a series of ink drawings depicting black Southern life; Did the Bear Sit under the Tree? (1969), a painting that highlights political and racial conditions; Women I've Known (1976), a collage of spray paint through stencils and folded paper; and Flight (1981), a mural in the Hartman International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia.

Born in Madison, Georgia Andrews served four years in the United States Air Force before beginning his formal art training He had shown promising artistic skill at a very young age by drawing cartoons and he developed a deep interest in art Andrews decided to attend the Art Institute of Chicago in Illinois ...

Article

Aaron Myers

Charles White was born in Chicago, Illinois to unmarried parents, Ethel Gary and Charles White, Sr., who separated when he was three years old. He was raised by his mother in Chicago. After winning a national pencil sketch contest in 1937, White attended the Art Institute of Chicago for a year, then worked as an artist in the Works Progress Administration during the late 1930s. In 1941, White traveled through the South on a Rosenwald Fellowship. The following year, he moved to New York, New York and studied at the Art Students League.

In 1944, while serving in the Army, White was diagnosed with tuberculosis and was hospitalized for three years. In 1947 he had his first one man show at the ACA Gallery in New York City after which he went to Mexico where he worked for nearly a year at the printmaking workshop ...

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Amy Helene Kirschke

artist. Hale Aspacio Woodruff was born in Cairo, Illinois, but spent much of his childhood in Nashville, Tennessee. After graduating from high school he attended the Herron Art Institute in Indianapolis, Indiana. Like many of the Harlem Renaissance artists and indeed other serious American artists of any race, Woodruff traveled to Paris to receive the best training possible. He had the support of many patrons in Indianapolis and served as a correspondent for the Indianapolis Star newspaper, regularly sending home columns about his life in Paris.

Woodruff returned to the United States in 1931, when he was hired by Atlanta University to direct its art department. At Atlanta University, Woodruff was virtually a one-man department, with some help from artists such as Nancy Elizabeth Prophet He was one of a handful of studio art professors in the state of Georgia and also taught at Spelman College and ...

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Robert Fay

Hale Aspacio Woodruff was born in Cairo, Illinois. He attended public schools in Nashville, Tennessee, where he was raised by his mother. In 1920, he moved to Indianapolis to study art at the John Herron Art Institute, supporting himself with part-time work as a political cartoonist. He developed an interest in African art during this period, which influenced his later work. In 1926 Woodruff won a Harmon Foundation Award to study at the Académie Moderne de la Grande Chaumière in Paris from 1927 to 1931.

Woodruff returned to the United States in 1931 and founded the art department at Atlanta University where he helped to develop a cohesive national African American arts community In addition to teaching Woodruff brought exhibitions to Atlanta University that featured a wide range of past and present African American artists who were often excluded from mainstream art exhibitions To further promote African ...