1-4 of 4 Results  for:

  • 1941–1954: WWII and Postwar Desegregation x
  • Arts and Leisure x
  • Archives, Collections, and Libraries x
Clear all

Article

Hassoum Ceesay

director of The Gambia National Library and author of the first Gambian Who’s Who, was born in Bathurst and attended the Methodist Girls’ High School. She worked at the General Post Office and later at the British Council. She pioneered library services in The Gambia, and she was one of the earliest professional librarians in black Africa. In 1957, she had a yearlong internship at the Ghana National Library Board, and did further studies in the United Kingdom, where she qualified as a chartered librarian in 1959. At the time, very few Gambian women were in professions outside the traditionally female jobs of teaching, nursing, and secretarial work.

Bishop John Daley of the Anglican Mission opened the first public library in Banjul in 1945; a year later, the British Council opened its library and reading room. When the British Council closed operations in 1963 it handed ...

Article

Billie E. Walker

librarian, author, developer of curricula in multicultural children's literature, and one of the first bibliographers of African American children's books, was born in Yazoo City, Mississippi, the daughter of Allen G. Hill, a farmer, and Birdie Tucker, a teacher. During her early childhood, Rollins's family moved to the Oklahoma territory. Although Rollins was denied access to her local library as a child because of her race, she credited her family with encouraging her to seek as much education as possible, and her grandmother, a former slave, with instilling in her a love of books. She explained: “Grandma told wonderful stories of her life as a slave. I've always loved books because of her…. I would read anything and everything” (Hopkins, 300). Rollins attended segregated schools in Beggs, Oklahoma; St. Louis, Missouri; and Holly Springs, Mississippi; and in 1916 she graduated from ...

Article

Vanessa J. Morris

academic and international librarian, educator, and scholar, was born Thelma Horn to Daniel Horn, a farmer and a minister, and Cora Ingram, a housewife. She was raised in the rural town of Coatopa, Alabama, with her brother Herman Horn and sister Mattie James (née Horn). Tate majored in history, education, and library science to earn her bachelor's degree from Alabama State University in Montgomery in 1957. She received a master's degree in Library Science from the University of Illinois– Urbana Champaign, in 1961. Thelma Horn Tate began her career in education with the Chicago Public Library system, where she directed a K-12 school library during the early days of the civil rights movement. She was head librarian at the Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena, Mississippi, before she joined the Rutgers University library system in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1970 ...

Article

Constance Porter Uzelac

archivist, bibliophile, scholar, and librarian, was born Dorothy Louise Burnett in Warrenton, Virginia, the daughter of Hayes Joseph Burnett, a physician, and Bertha Ball, a tennis champion. After her father graduated from Howard University's Medical School, the family moved to Montclair, New Jersey, where she was raised and graduated from Montclair High School in 1923. In 1924, she received a teacher's certificate from Palmer Method of Business Writing and in 1925 received a teaching diploma from Myrtilla Miner Normal School in Washington. She worked as a librarian at Miner Teachers College from 1925 to 1926. Her mentor Lula Allan, librarian at Miner influenced her to change her field of interest from teaching to library service. In 1929 she married James Amos Porter who became a well known African American artist and art historian they had one daughter Constance Burnett ...