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was born in Chicago, Illinois, one of four children of physician Henry N. Cress and educator Ida Mae Griffen. Welsing and her three siblings were raised on Chicago’s Southside. Her teachers at Douglass Elementary School had a profound impact on her development and her high school teachers’ persistent emphasis on black achievement inspired her to serve her community. In 1957 Welsing received her B.S. degree from Antioch College located in Yellow Springs, Ohio. She met and eventually married Johannes Kramer Welsing while enrolled at Howard University Medical School during 1961. Welsing graduated from Howard in 1962. Following graduation, Welsing engaged in a combination of internships, residencies, and fellowships at various hospitals from 1962 to 1968.

By 1968 Welsing started a teaching career at Howard University as an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry She specialized in mental health and adolescent psychiatry On campus she distinguished ...

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Scott Yanow

jazz trumpeter, figure skater, and psychiatrist, was born in New York City. His father, Billy Williams, was the lead singer in Billy Williams and the Charioteers, while his mother was a dancer who was one of the Brown Twins at the Cotton Club. She danced with Bill “Bojangles” Robinson and the Nicholas Brothers and can be seen in the Fats Waller short film of “Ain’t Misbehavin’,” sitting on the piano while he sang to her. After Billy Williams's death, Henderson's mother married a doctor in San Francisco. His stepfather had many musician patients, including Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and Duke Ellington.

Henderson began on the trumpet when he was nine. His first teacher was Louis Armstrong who gave him a few informal lessons Henderson moved to San Francisco with his family when he was 14 He studied at the San Francisco Conservatory of ...

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Justin David Gifford

forensic psychiatrist, novelist, and filmmaker, was born in Washington, D.C., to Devonia Jefferson, a teacher and playwright, and Bernard Jefferson, a judge. At an early age, Jefferson moved with his family to Los Angeles where he attended integrated public schools. Raised in a family that discouraged him from pursing a career as a writer, Jefferson studied anthropology in college, earning his BA from the University of Southern California in 1961. In 1965 Jefferson earned his MD from Howard University and became a practicing physician in Los Angeles. In 1966, he married a teacher named Melanie L. Moore, with whom he would eventually have four children, Roland Jr., Rodney, Shannon, and Royce. Between 1969 and 1971 he served as a captain and psychiatrist at Lockborne Air Force Base in Columbus Ohio It was during this time that he ...